SA Rare Bird News Report - 19 August 2021

95 views
Skip to first unread message

Trevor Hardaker

unread,
Aug 19, 2021, 12:01:29 PMAug 19
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Thursday, 19 August 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

SARBN is proud to be associated

with the following brands:

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE CONSIDER FOLLOWING ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKED ICONS BELOW:

 

Instagram

Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another quiet few days have passed but, starting the Western Cape, a single RED-BILLED QUELEA was reported in Tokai yesterday while the main focus of many provincial twitchers remained on the juvenile DWARF BITTERN which was still showing well at Sandbaai in Hermanus today.

 

Just also as a general request for all birders going to see this bird, please keep a respectable distance from it and don’t try and push too close to it to get better photos. I have been sent some photos of this happening, so it’s not just hearsay. There is no need to unnecessarily stress this bird by flushing it because you are too close as it will fly away like it did yesterday afternoon which meant that a lot of people subsequently missed it later on. Fortunately, it came back to the original spot this morning, so all is good for now. Let’s just keep the bird’s best interests at heart when viewing it and also keep consideration for all our fellow birders that are still planning on coming to look for it.

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© John Graham

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Greta Graham

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Michael Mason

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Stanislav Novotny

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Robert Cooper

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Pamela Cooper

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© David Hall

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Gielie Bester

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Michael McSweeney

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Daryl de Beer

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Johann Strauss

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Johan van der Westhuizen

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Karin Wilson

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Brian Vanderwalt

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Charles Britz

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Pete Walker

 

 

Up in Kwazulu Natal, a DARK CHANTING GOSHAWK was reported again at Manyoni Private Game Reserve yesterday.

 

In Gauteng, a single SWALLOW-TAILED BEE-EATER was seen at the Vaal Dam this morning.

 

Across in Mpumalanga, the 2 AFRICAN SKIMMERS were still visible from the Olifants River bridge in the Kruger National Park this morning.

 

And finally, in Zimbabwe, the LONG-TOED LAPWINGS were still at Darwendale Dam yesterday with at least 8 adults and 4 chicks seen there.

 

 

Long-toed Lapwing at Darwendale Dam

© Jean-Michel Blake

Long-toed Lapwing chick at Darwendale Dam

© Barry Launder

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image001.png
image002.jpg
image003.jpg
image004.png
image005.png
image006.png
image007.png
image008.jpg
image009.jpg
image010.jpg
image011.jpg
image012.jpg
image013.jpg
image014.jpg
image015.jpg
image016.jpg
image017.jpg
image018.jpg
image019.jpg
image020.jpg
image021.jpg
image022.jpg
image023.jpg
image024.jpg
image025.jpg
image026.jpg
image027.jpg
image028.jpg
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages