SA Rare Bird News Report - 11 April 2022

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Trevor Hardaker

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Apr 11, 2022, 12:00:54 PMApr 11
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S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Monday, 11 April 2022.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

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Starting in the Western Cape, the big news was the appearance of a RED-TAILED TROPICBIRD over Steenberg Golf Course on Saturday afternoon. This is surely the same bird that has now been seen multiple times around the Peninsula in recent weeks and months, but it’s appearances seem extremely erratic and unpredictable and, as quickly as it appears, it seems to disappear as well and not a single twitcher was able to connect with it after the initial report on Saturday. Elsewhere, lingerers included the RED-NECKED PHALAROPE still at Kliphoek Salt Pans in Velddrif today and the AFRICAN PIED WAGTAIL still at the Postcard Café in Jonkershoek yesterday while the Stanford area turned up a single FULVOUS WHISTLING DUCK at Willem Appel Dam in the town on Friday and a CAPE VULTURE about 12km east of town yesterday. Over on the Garden Route, a WHITE-FRONTED BEE-EATER was seen on Leisure Isle in Knysna on Saturday and the popular EURASIAN OYSTERCATCHER was still on the Keurbooms River estuary in Plettenberg Bay at -34.029, 23.391 until at least Friday while 2 CROWNED HORNBILLS were reported moving about in the ravine between Askop Ridge and Brackenburn Private Nature Reserve in The Craggs near Plettenberg Bay this afternoon.

 

 

African Pied Wagtail at Postcard Café

© Kevin Shields

Cape Vulture east of Stanford

© Stephan Wolfart

 

 

White-fronted Bee-eater on Leisure Isle

© Derek Hutchings

Eurasian Oystercatcher at the Keurbooms River estuary

© Ian Rijsdijk

 

 

In the Eastern Cape, 4 BURCHELL’S COURSERS were seen on Amakhala Private Game Reserve near Grahamstown on Saturday while yet another LILAC-BREASTED ROLLER was reported in the province as well, this time from just outside Driekwartblou Guesthouse in Oviston this afternoon.

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, a HARLEQUIN QUAIL was found at Zimbali this morning, always an unusual species in this part of the province.

 

 

Burchell’s Courser on Amakhala Private Game Reserve

© Rob Boyd

Harlequin Quail at Zimbali

© Calvin Harris

 

 

Limpopo chimed in with a single GREATER FLAMINGO at Pioneer Dam bird hide near Mopani camp in the Kruger National Park on Friday.

 

Up in Namibia, a single FULVOUS WHISTLING DUCK was found at Gammams Water Care Works in Windhoek yesterday while no fewer than 10 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were still at Walvis Bay Salt Works at -23.013, 14.431 on Friday.

 

And finally, in Mozambique, it’s back to the Bela Vista wetlands south of Maputo which seems to be the birding site that just keeps on giving at the moment producing a PECTORAL SANDPIPER on Saturday, one of only a handful of records ever in the country.

 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck at Gammams Water Care Works

© Neil Thomson

Pectoral Sandpiper at Bela Vista

© Samuel Liebert

 

 

Pectoral Sandpiper at Bela Vista

© James Hogg

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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