SA Rare Bird News Report - 14 March 2022

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Trevor Hardaker

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Mar 14, 2022, 12:01:00 PMMar 14
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com, aa...@rbi-tech.co.za

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Monday, 14 March 2022.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

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Starting in the Western Cape, there were still large numbers of FULVOUS WHISTLING DUCKS on Pan P4 at Strandfontein Sewage Works on Saturday while a single SAND MARTIN was also reported at Pan S4 yesterday. Paardevlei held on to both the BAIRD’S SANDPIPER (still there this afternoon) and PECTORAL SANDPIPER (still there until at least Saturday) while there was also some excitement when a FRIGATEBIRD, thought to probably be a male GREAT FRIGATEBIRD was seen briefly just offshore of the Gordon’s Bay harbour wall late on Saturday afternoon. Elsewhere, a BROWN SNAKE EAGLE was seen at Jordan Wine Estate in Stellenbosch this morning, a GOLIATH HERON was found at the dam at Jonkersrivier farm between Worcester and Villiersdorp on Friday, two ROSEATE TERNS were seen in Pearly Beach yesterday, several BLUE-CHEEKED BEE-EATERS were still around Rhenosterkop in Agulhas National Park yesterday, an ELEGANT TERN was found at De Mond Nature Reserve yesterday and the SADDLE-BILLED STORK was still in place at the farm dam just outside Heidelberg earlier today. The EURASIAN OYUSTERCATCHER was also still on the Keurbooms River estuary in Plettenberg Bay yesterday and a BLACK-CHESTED SNAKE EAGLE was seen again south of Beaufort West at -32.485, 22.562 on Saturday.

 

A number of EUROPEAN ROLLERS were also reported with one still along the Karwyderskraal Road at -34.29, 19.184 on Saturday, one still present on the R43 close to the entrance to Pearly Beach today, two just east of Riviersonderend along the N2 this afternoon, another on the Vaandrigsdrif road about 100m from the N2 intersection, one along the dirt road outside Vergaderingskop Nature Reserve this afternoon, one seen along the R328, north of Brandwacht, at -34.020,22.063 yesterday and 2 birds reported along the R340 in Plettenberg Bay at -34.004, 23.372 yesterday as well.

 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Michael Mason

Fulvous Whistling Ducks at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Otto Schmidt

 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Tony Kent

Fulvous Whistling Ducks at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Cathy Kent

 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Zoe Lunau

 

 

Baird’s Sandpiper at Paardevlei

© Matthew Prophet

Baird’s Sandpiper at Paardevlei

© Finn Gretschel

 

 

Baird’s Sandpiper at Paardevlei

© Carl Taljaard

Baird’s Sandpiper (front) and Pectoral Sandpiper at Paardevlei

© Karin Wilson

 

 

Pectoral Sandpiper (left) and Baird’s Sandpiper (right) at Paardevlei

© Stanislav Novotny

 

 

European Roller along the Karwyderskraal road

© Johan van der Westhuizen

European Roller along the Karwyderskraal road

© Johan Olivier

 

 

Brown Snake Eagle in Stellenbosch

© Alex Jordan

Goliath Heron on Jonkersrivier farm

© Gielie de Villiers

 

 

Blue-cheeked Bee-eater in Agulhas National Park

© Lester van Groeningen

Elegant Tern at De Mond Nature Reserve

© Dana Goldberg

 

 

Eurasian Oystercatcher on the Keurbooms River estuary

© Mark Heystek

Eurasian Oystercatcher on the Keurbooms River estuary

© Aart Verrips

 

 

Up in the Northern Cape, a EUROPEAN ROLLER was reported at Osfontein Guest Farm, between Carnarvon and Loxton, at -31.236, 22.335 on Saturday.

 

In the Eastern Cape, a DWARF BITTERN was found just north of Beacon Bay at -32.934, 27.924 this morning while the other DWARF BITTERN was still at the Red Bishop hide in Main Camp at Addo National Park yesterday. Other notable records included the WOODLAND KINGFISHER still at Camdeboo National Park on Friday, a small group of BLUE-CHEEKED BEE-EATERS seen over Colchester this afternoon, a LILAC-BREASTED ROLLER found at Lalibela Game Reserve on Saturday and a EUROPEAN ROLLER found on a Private Game Reserve about 15km from Graaff-Reinet yesterday. Another interesting record was of a male LONG-TAILED PARADISE WHYDAH found in Colchester at -33.706, 25.803 on the weekend, although the possibility of an escapee cannot be totally ruled out here.

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Addo National Park

© Neil Ebedes

Dwarf Bittern at Addo National Park

© Bert Ophoff

 

 

European Roller near Graaff-Reinet

© Johan Bouwer

Long-tailed Paradise Whydah in Colchester

© Aart Verrips

 

 

Woodland Kingfisher in Camdeboo National Park

© Jorrie Jordaan

 

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, a RED PHALAROPE was found at Shongweni Dam on Friday and was still there yesterday and an AFRICAN CRAKE was recorded on a farm in Cramond in the Albert falls Dam area on Saturday. There were still several lingerers in place too including the EURASIAN OYSTERCATCHER still on rocks at the end of South Beach Road in Umdloti yesterday, the RUFOUS-BELLIED HERON still at Umbogavango Nature Reserve in Amanzimtoti on Saturday and the LESSER MOORHEN still at the Wattled Crane hide in the Karkloof Conservancy on Saturday as well

 

 

African Crake in Crammond

© Stefan Ringelmann

Rufous-bellied Heron at Umbogavango Nature Reserve

© Stewart Clarke

 

 

In the Free State, a LESSER MOORHEN was reported at Soutpan at -28.732, 26.067 yesterday.

 

Gauteng’s Marievale Bird Sanctuary continued to be popular with birders on the weekend with the SPOTTED CRAKE still around at -26.337, 28.516 yesterday and a SLATY EGRET seen at Hadeda hide yesterday as well.

 

 

Lesser Moorhen at Soutpan

© Mandy McDonald

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Philip Yiannakou

 

 

Slaty Egret at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Elmarie Hirschhorn

 

 

Over in Mpumalanga, 3 SOUTHERN POCHARDS (2 males and a female) were found at Blyderivierspoort Dam on Saturday, still a rather unusual species for the Lowveld.

 

Up in Limpopo, 2 SADDLE-BILLED STORKS were seen near Crake Road at Zaagkuildrift at -25.168, 28.139 on Saturday.

 

 

Southern Pochards at Blyderivierspoort Dam

© Duncan McKenzie

 

 

Into Namibia where the YELLOW-THROATED LEAFLOVES were back in the gardens of Caprivi Houseboat Safari Lodge yesterday while both a SADDLE-BILLED STORK and a YELLOW-CROWNED BISHOP were reported at a dam on the farm Nomtsas near Maltahöhe on Friday.

 

 

Saddle-billed Stork on farm Nomtsas

© Albert Voights

Yellow-crowned Bishop on farm Nomtsas

© Albert Voights

 

 

Across in Zimbabwe, there was some excitement when a hepatic LESSER CUCKOO was found at Aberfoyle on Wednesday.

 

And finally, in Mozambique, at least one BROAD-BILLED SANDPIPER was still present at the Bela Vista wetlands south of Maputo on Friday.

 

 

Lesser Cuckoo at Aberfoyle

© Piet Zwanikken

Lesser Cuckoo at Aberfoyle

© Richard Crawshaw

 

 

Broad-billed Sandpiper at Bela Vista wetlands

© Olivier Hamerlynck

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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