SA Rare Bird News Report - 08 July 2021

95 views
Skip to first unread message

Trevor Hardaker

unread,
Jul 8, 2021, 12:00:55 PMJul 8
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Thursday, 08 July 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

SARBN is proud to be associated

with the following brands:

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE CONSIDER FOLLOWING ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKED ICONS BELOW:

 

Instagram

Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting in the Western Cape, there was some local surprize when a FAIRY FLYCATCHER was found on a private farm in Kuilsriver on Tuesday, a rather unusual bird for the greater Cape Town area. Elsewhere, at least 3 DOUBLE-BANDED COURSERS were still present along the R307 near Moorreesburg at -33.208, 18.514 yesterday. There was plenty of action still on the Garden Route with several WHITE-FRONTED BEE-EATERS still present along the Gouritz River, south of Herbertsdale, at -34.084, 21.768 today, the ALLEN’S GALLINULE still in Wilderness today, the AFRICAN GRASS OWL still between Langvlei and Rondevlei, near Wilderness, on Tuesday evening, the SQUACCO HERON still in Sedgefield at -34.010, 22.789 yesterday, the GOLIATH HERON back at Montage Village in Sedgefield yesterday afternoon, an AFRICAN PIED WAGTAIL still at the Knysna Waterfront yesterday and another 3 AFRICAN PIED WAGTAILS still at the public jettys along the Keurbooms River in Plettenberg Bay on Tuesday while the biggest local excitement came with the discovery of 3 CROWNED HORNBILLS at Brackenburn Private Nature Reserve in The Crags between Plettenberg Bay and Nature’s Valley yesterday which were still present there today.

 

 

Fairy Flycatcher in Kuilsriver

© Oliver Main

Double-banded Courser near Moorreesburg

© Matthew Orolowitz

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Mariana Steyn

 

 

Goliath Heron in Montage Village

© Joy Herbst

African Pied Wagtail in Knysna Waterfront

© Rika Olivier

 

 

Crowned Hornbill at Brackenburn Private Nature Reserve

© Garret Skead

Crowned Hornbill at Brackenburn Private Nature Reserve

© Ian Rijsdijk

 

 

In the Eastern Cape, lingerers included the GREEN-BACKED (STRIATED) HERON still at Kings Court Dam in Port Elizabeth on Tuesday and the BURCHELL’S COURSERS still on Amakhala Private Game Reserve yesterday while a single AUSTRALASIAN GANNET was also present on Bird Island in Algoa Bay earlier today.

 

And finally, in Kwazulu Natal, a SICKLE-WINGED CHAT was found at Buffalo Bond Private Game Reserve, near Colenso, at -28.824, 29.775 yesterday, the CAPPED WHEATEAR was still at Tala Game Reserve at -29.837, 30.535 earlier today, a VERREAUX’S EAGLE OWL was seen at Eshowe Golf Estate on Tuesday and a dead TROPICAL SHEARWATER was found on the beach at St Lucia on Tuesday.

 

 

Green-backed (Striated) Heron at Kings Court Dam

© Trevor Flugel

Verreaux’s Eagle Owl at Eshowe Golf Estate

© Eric Brits

 

 

Australasian Gannet on Bird Island

© Eduard Drost

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image001.png
image002.jpg
image003.jpg
image004.png
image005.png
image006.png
image007.png
image008.jpg
image009.jpg
image010.jpg
image011.jpg
image012.jpg
image013.jpg
image014.jpg
image015.jpg
image016.jpg
image017.jpg
image018.jpg
image019.jpg
image020.jpg
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages