SA Rare Bird News Report - 28 June 2021

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Trevor Hardaker

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Jun 28, 2021, 12:01:12 PMJun 28
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Monday, 28 June 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

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Starting in the Western Cape, there was still plenty of local excitement for the Garden Route birders with the juvenile ALLEN’S GALLINULE that continued to show well in Wilderness at -33.993, 22.582 throughout the weekend and was still present there today. Elsewhere, at least one SQUACCO HERON was still in the channel connecting Langvlei and Rondevlei, near Wilderness, yesterday and the COMMON SCIMITARBILL was also still on view in Meiringspoort at -33.368, 22.551 yesterday while a number of provincial listers also made their way across to Roam Private Game Reserve where at least 2 LONG-TAILED PARADISE WHYDAHS were still showing well there yesterday.

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Brian Taggart

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Neil Ebedes

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Ben Fouche

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Mike Mills

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Ian Farr

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Mike Bridgeford

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Albert McLean

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Diane McLean

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Rudolph Steyn

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Justin Ponder

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Mike Pienaar

Allen’s Gallinule in Wilderness

© Elmarie Brits

 

 

Allen’s Gallinule twitchers in Wilderness

© Neil Ebedes

 

Squacco Heron between Langvlei and Rondevlei

© Regard van Dyk

 

 

Long-tailed Paradise Whydah at Roam Private Game Reserve

© Michael Mason

Long-tailed Paradise Whydah at Roam Private Game Reserve

© Stanislav Novotny

 

 

Long-tailed Paradise Whydah at Roam Private Game Reserve

© Patrick Raymond

 

 

In the Eastern Cape, the LITTLE BEE-EATER was still hanging around at Cape Recife yesterday.

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, the SOUTHERN WHITE-FACED OWL was back in a private garden in St Andrew’s Drive in Durban North on Saturday, the BLACK-NECKED GREBE was still at Lake Shepstone at -27.858, 30.173 on Saturday, a RUFOUS-BELLIED HERON was reported at Umgavusa Dam on Friday and a LESSER MOORHEN was still at Tala Game Reserve on Friday while there was also some surprize when a freshly dead STRIPED CRAKE was found at Mtunzini Fish Farm this morning.

 

 

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Patrick Killian

 

 

Striped Crake at Mtunzini Fish Farm

© Hugh Chittenden

Southern White-faced Owl in Durban North

© Zach Simpson

 

 

Mpumalanga continued to be front and centre in everyone’s minds with the mega LESSER WHITETHROAT that continued to show well flitting about in the trees in the carpark around the Amazing Kruger View Restaurant in Henk van Rooyen Park throughout the weekend and was still drawing the crowds earlier today while many twitchers could also divert to connect with an AFRICAN SKIMMER that was found at Sunset Dam near Lower Sabie in the Kruger National Park on Saturday.

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Keenan Houareau

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Marc Cronje

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Zies van Zyl

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Maans Booysen

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Bart Fokkens

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Wade Lee

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Hennie Storm

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Lance Robinson

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© John Graham

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© George Skinner

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Rene Rousouw

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Peter Rosewarne

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Peter Thompson

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Philip Yiannakou

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Michael Mandy

Lesser Whitethroat in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Tom Drinkwater

 

 

Lesser Whitethroat twitchers in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Frans-Hendrik Joubert

 

Lesser Whitethroat twitchers in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Carron Hinchley

 

Lesser Whitethroat twitchers in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Hanneline Smit-Robinson

 

Lesser Whitethroat twitchers in Henk van Rooyen Park

© Sheleph Burger

 

 

African Skimmer at Sunset Dam

© Rene Rousouw

African Skimmer at Sunset Dam

© Philip Yiannakou

 

 

African Skimmer at Sunset Dam

© Tom Drinkwater

 

 

Up in Limpopo, a CAPPED WHEATEAR was found at Boyela waterhole, about 6km south of Babalala picnic site, in the Kruger National Park yesterday.

 

And finally, in Zimbabwe, there was some local surprize when no fewer than 3 LONG-TOED LAPWINGS were found at Marlborough Sewage Ponds in Harare at -17.739, 30.994 on Friday, a really odd record for the area, and this was then followed up with a further 2 LONG-TOED LAPWINGS found at Darwendale Dam near Harare on Saturday.

 

 

Long-toed Lapwing at Marlborough Sewage Ponds

© Barry Launder

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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