SA Rare Bird News Report - 30 September 2021

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Trevor Hardaker

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Sep 30, 2021, 12:00:40 PM9/30/21
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Thursday, 30 September 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

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It’s still a little on the quiet side, but at least a few interesting reports coming through…

 

Starting in the Eastern Cape, both the LESSER SAND PLOVER and the RED KNOT were still at the Kromme River estuary in St Francis Bay this afternoon.

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, a PURPLE ROLLER was reported at Manyoni Private Game Reserve yesterday.

 

 

Lesser Sand Plover at the Kromme River estuary

© Mike Buckham

Purple Roller at Manyoni Private Game Reserve

© Wade Lee

 

 

The Free State held on to the BAILLON’S CRAKE which was still at Lillydale farm near Harrismith yesterday.

 

Across in Mpumalanga, a RED-THROATED WRYNECK at Numbi gate in the Kruger National Park yesterday was an interesting find while the 2 AFRICAN SKIMMERS were also still at Malelane bridge on the Crocodile River this afternoon as well.

 

In the North-west Province, the PINK-BACKED PELICAN remained in place at Rockwall Dam near Rustenburg yesterday.

 

 

Baillon’s Crake near Harrismith

© David Weaver

Pink-backed Pelican at Rockwall Dam

© Helen Badenhorst

 

 

Up in Namibia, the wayward SWAMP BOUBOU was reported again along the Swakop River in Swakopmund opposite the cemetery on Tuesday.

 

And finally, Mozambique, and specifically the San Sebastian Peninsula near Vilanculous, is where all the best action of the last few days has been happening. A single LESSER NODDY is possibly the stand-out bird of the lot (present there from at least Monday to yesterday) while there were also plenty of other notable Tern records as well with as many as 50 SAUNDERS’S TERNS being reported along with 15 DAMARA TERNS and no fewer than 65 ROSEATE TERNS, all seemingly out of range for the area. And, if one got bored with the Terns, you could turn your attention to the amazing 65 CRAB PLOVERS as well while, this morning, the added distractions were increased with 3 EURASIAN OYSTERCATCHERS, all in all a real mouth-watering list of birds for a single site!

 

 

Lesser Noddy on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Dave Gilroy

Lesser Noddy on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Niall Perrins

 

 

Lesser Noddy on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Jacques Fourie

Lesser Noddy on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Albert McLean

 

 

Crab Plovers on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Jacques Fourie

 

 

Saunders’s Tern on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Dave Gilroy

Saunders’s Tern on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Jacques Fourie

 

 

Saunders’s Tern on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Diane McLean

Roseate Tern on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Albert McLean

 

 

Roseate Terns on the San Sebastian Peninsula

© Dave Gilroy

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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