SA Rare Bird News Report - 04 April 2022

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Trevor Hardaker

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Apr 4, 2022, 12:01:01 PMApr 4
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S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Monday, 04 April 2022.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

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Starting in the Western Cape, the FULVOUS WHISTLING DUCKS were still on Pan P4 at Strandfontein Sewage Works today and AFRICAN PALM SWIFTS were reported at Dolphin Beach Pans on both days of the weekend with up to 4 individuals seen together. An AFRICAN JACANA was found at a dam along the R304 near Klipheuwel at -33.777, 18.762 on Friday and was still there on Saturday while other lingerers included the AFRICAN PIED WAGTAIL still at the Postcard Café in Jonkershoek on Saturday and the GREATER SAND PLOVER still at the Uilenkraals River, east of Gansbaai, earlier today. Over on the Garden Route, the RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was still present at the pan near Boggoms Bay at -34.246, 21.887 yesterday, a group of more than 20 FULVOUS WHISTLING DUCKS were found at Swartvlei near Sedgefield at -34.007, 22.767 on Saturday and a GOLIATH HERON was seen close by yesterday, the popular EURASIAN OYSTERCATCHER was still on the Keurbooms River estuary in Plettenberg Bay yesterday, 2 AFRICAN PIED WAGTAILS were also still along the Keurbooms River on Saturday and at least one EUROPEAN ROLLER was still along the Uplands Road near Plettenberg Bay at -33.953, 23.323 on Saturday as well. Inland, another EUROPEAN ROLLER was reported earlier today south of Leeu Gamka at -32.948, 21.985.

 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Trevor Hardaker

Fulvous Whistling Ducks at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Gareth Bain

 

 

African Palm Swift at Dolphin Beach Pans

© Regard van Dyk

African Palm Swift at Dolphin Beach Pans

© Trevor Hardaker

 

 

African Jacana along R304

© Charles Britz

African Pied Wagtail along the Keurbooms River

© Pieter Schoeman

 

 

Red-necked Phalarope near Boggoms Bay

© Michal Groenewald

 

 

Eurasian Oystercatcher at the Keurbooms River estuary

© Justin Ponder

Eurasian Oystercatcher at the Keurbooms River estuary

© Evan Schoeman

 

 

In the Eastern Cape, there were some good new local records coming through with a COMMON CUCKOO found in Redhouse in Port Elizabeth yesterday, a LESSER GREY SHRIKE seen on powerlines near Committees Drift at -33.19, 26.829 on Saturday and a BRONZE-WINGED COURSER found on Amakhala Private Game Reserve on Saturday evening.

 

 

Lesser Grey Shrike near Committees Drift

© Lynette Rudman

Bronze-winged Courser on Amakhala Private Game Reserve

© Donovan Hulett

 

 

Common Cuckoo in Redhouse

© Patrick Kilian

 

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, the EURASIAN OYSTERCATCHER was still at Umdloti until at least Saturday while other lingerers included the RUFOUS-BELLIED HERON still at Umbogovango Nature Reserve in Amanzimtoti on Saturday, the YELLOW-CROWNED BISHOP still at Amanzimtoti Bird Park on Saturday and a LESSER MOORHEN still on the private farm dam in Port Edward on Saturday. New records of interest included another RUFOUS-BELLIED HERON found at Manyoni Private Game Reserve on Friday and a NEERGAARD’S SUNBIRD found in a private garden in Richard’s Bay on 17 March and still present in the same area until at least Friday.

 

 

Lesser Moorhen in Port Edward

© Stan Culley

Neergaard’s Sunbird in Richard’s Bay

© Richard van Haght

 

 

In Gauteng, there were still 2 SPOTTED CRAKES at Marievale Bird Sanctuary yesterday which continue to attract lots of local attention.

 

Over in the North-west Province, at least 2 STRIPED CRAKES were present at the Plat River on the Zaagkuildrift road on Friday.

 

 

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Peter Hall

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Pieter Lombaard

 

 

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Rolf Wiesler

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Carl Taljaard

 

 

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Hamman Prinsloo

Spotted Crake at Marievale Bird Sanctuary

© Daniel Lotter

 

 

Up in Namibia, 3 RED-NECKLED PHALAROPES were reported at the Walvis Bay Salt Works yesterday.

 

Across in Botswana, a LESSER MOORHEN was found on Friday at Mabuasehube, a little out of range for the species.

 

And finally, in Mozambique, the WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER and no fewer than 8 CAPE SHOVELERS were still at the Bela Vista wetlands, south of Maputo, on Friday.

 

 

Red-necked Phalaropes in Walvis Bay

© Jason McCormick

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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