SA Rare Bird News Report - 17 August 2021

90 views
Skip to first unread message

Trevor Hardaker

unread,
Aug 17, 2021, 2:11:13 AMAug 17
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 08h10 on Tuesday, 17 August 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

SARBN is proud to be associated

with the following brands:

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE CONSIDER FOLLOWING ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKED ICONS BELOW:

 

Instagram

Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting in the Western Cape, an AFRICAN JACANA was found at Mitchell’s Plain Waste Water Treatment Works on Friday while there were still 2 DOUBLE-BANDED COURSERS present in the same area near Moorreesburg on Sunday. There was plenty of local excitement when news filtered through of a DWARF BITTERN found at Sandbaai in Hermanus on Saturday which is still in the same area at -34.423, 19.199 this morning. Over on the Garden Route, there were 2 GOLDEN-BREASTED BUNTINGS at Outeniqua Nature Reserve at -33.936, 22.435 on Saturday while the AFRICAN PIED WAGTAIL was still at the Knysna Waterfront until at least Thursday afternoon and, moving inland, there were still 2 SQUACCO HERONS present at Beaufort West Sewage Works yesterday.

 

 

African Jacana at Mitchell’s Plain Waste Water Treatment Works

© Graham Pringle

Double-banded Courser near Moorreesburg

© Joel Radue

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Teresa Milne

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Bryn de Kocks

 

 

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Joel Radue

Dwarf Bittern at Sandbaai

© Garret Skead

 

 

Golden-breasted Bunting at Outeniqua Nature Reserve

© Pieter Uitenweerde

Squacco Heron at Beaufort West Sewage Works

© Wessel Uys

 

 

The Northern Cape continues to be in the limelight with a juvenile EGYPTIAN VULTURE seen at Kuruman River Reserve at -26.921, 21.840 yesterday. This is only about 200km south-east of where another (or probably the same) bird was hanging out recently in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park and further sightings of that one have also been received with it seen at Cubitje Quap on 5 August and again at Nossob on Wednesday, 15 August.

 

 

Egyptian Vulture at Cubitje Quap

© Jenny Rood

 

 

In Kwazulu Natal, it was all about lingerers with the BLACK-NECKED GREBE still at Thurlow Game Reserve on Sunday and the juvenile PALE CHANTING GOSHAWK still present south of Midmar Dam at -29.562, 30.139 on Sunday as well.

 

Mpumalanga held on to the AFRICAN SKIMMER which was still present at the Olifants River bridge in the Kruger National Park on Sunday while another 2 AFRICAN SKIMMERS were seen along the Crocodile River at Leopard Creek late on Thursday afternoon.

 

And finally, in Zimbabwe, 4 pairs of LONG-TOED LAPWINGS, one pair with 2 chicks, were seen at Darwendale Dam on Saturday.

 

 

Pale Chanting Goshawk south of Midmar Dam

© Hennie Jordaan

 

African Skimmers at Leopard Creek

© Rob McLelland-Smith

Long-toed Lapwing at Darwendale Dam

© Barry Launder

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image001.png
image002.jpg
image003.jpg
image004.png
image005.png
image006.png
image007.png
image008.jpg
image009.jpg
image010.jpg
image011.jpg
image012.jpg
image013.jpg
image014.jpg
image015.jpg
image016.jpg
image017.jpg
image018.jpg
image019.jpg
image020.jpg
image021.jpg
image022.jpg
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages