SA Rare Bird News Report - 31 May 2021

86 views
Skip to first unread message

Trevor Hardaker

unread,
May 31, 2021, 12:01:19 PMMay 31
to sa-rare...@googlegroups.com

 

 

S O U T H E R N   A F R I C A N   R A R E   B I R D   N E W S   R E P O R T

 

 

 

This is the Southern African Rare Bird News Report issued at 18h00 on Monday, 31 May 2021.

 

Information has been gleaned from various websites, email groups as well as from individual observers who have passed on their sightings. This report cannot be taken as being totally comprehensive as it is based only on information made available at the time of writing. All bird sightings reported here are reported in good faith based on information as provided by the observers. Any inaccuracies are totally unintentional and the writer cannot be held liable for these.

 

None of the records included in this report have undergone any adjudication process with any of the subregion’s Rarities Committees, so inclusion in this report does not constitute any official confirmation of the particular record. Observers are still encouraged to make the necessary submissions accordingly.

 

For those who may have only joined the group recently and are interested in finding out what has been seen in the past, previous reports can be viewed at http://groups.google.co.za/group/sa-rarebirdnews

 

SARBN is proud to be associated

with the following brands:

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE CONSIDER FOLLOWING ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKED ICONS BELOW:

 

Instagram

Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting in the Western Cape, several pelagic trips ventured out yesterday and, between them, managed to accumulate some nice birds including SOUTHERN FULMAR and SPECTACLED PETREL. There was some local excitement when 2 KNOB-BILLED DUCKS were found on Pan P1 at Strandfontein Sewage Works on Saturday which were both still there today while another good local find was a male DUSKY SUNBIRD near Strandfontein Pavilion at -34.081, 18.572 on Saturday which was also still there today. Elsewhere, the DOUBLE-BANDED COURSERS were still near Moorreesburg yesterday, at least 3 AFRICAN RED-EYED BULBULS were reported at Driehoek campsite in the Cederberg on Saturday and the ROSEATE TERNS were also still hanging around at Kleinbaai with 4 seen there on Friday and at least 2 still there yesterday. Over on the Garden Route, there were 3 SQUACCO HERONS in the channel linking Langvlei and Rondevlei, between Wilderness and Sedgefield, on Saturday and a GOLDEN-BREASTED BUNTING was seen along the Hoogekraal road above Sedgefield at -33.973, 22.783 on Saturday as well.

 

 

Southern Fulmar on pelagic trip

© Vince Ward

 

Spectacled Petrel on pelagic trip

© Mayur Prag

Southern Fulmar on pelagic trip

© Mayur Prag

 

 

Spectacled Petrel on pelagic trip

© John Graham

Spectacled Petrel on pelagic trip

© Michael McSweeney

 

 

Spectacled Petrel (on left) on pelagic trip

© Richard Crawshaw

 

 

Knob-billed Ducks at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Ian Rijsdijk

Knob-billed Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Daryl de Beer

 

 

Knob-billed Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Robert Cooper

Knob-billed Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Pamela Cooper

 

 

Knob-billed Duck at Strandfontein Sewage Works

© Stanislav Novotny

Double-banded Coursers near Moorreesburg

© Daryl de Beer

 

 

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© John Graham

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Mike Buckham

 

 

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Ian Rijsdijk

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Jacque Smit

 

 

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Karin Wilson

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Jenny Wentzel

 

 

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Robert Cooper

Dusky Sunbird near Strandfontein Pavilion

© Pamela Cooper

 

 

African Red-eyed Bulbul at Driehoek campsite

© Gabriel Jamie

Squacco Heron between Langvlei and Rondevlei

© Regard van Dyk

 

 

Up in the Northern Cape, there was some surprize when an AFRICAN DUSKY FLYCATCHER was found in Prieska at -29.534, 22.999 on Saturday, well out of range for this species.

 

In the Eastern Cape, Cape Recife was still the centre of attention with both the LESSER NODDY and the LITTLE BEE-EATER still showing well there today. Not too far away, 2 HOUSE CROWS were also reported flying past Marine Towers on Saturday heading in the direction of Cape Recife.

 

 

Lesser Noddy at Cape Recife

© Meghan van der Linde

Lesser Noddy at Cape Recife

© Neil Ebedes

 

 

Lesser Noddy at Cape Recife

© Tristan Silver

 

 

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Andre Marais

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Rod Green

 

 

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Wilma Meiring

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Tristan Silver

 

 

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Meghan van der Linde

Little Bee-eater at Cape Recife

© Neil Ebedes

 

 

Moving up the coast into Kwazulu Natal, the BLUE KORHAAN was still south of Midmar Dam at -29.557, 30.154 on Friday, but has not been seen since then. A SOUTHERN WHITE-FACED OWL in a garden in St Andrews Drive in Durban North on Friday was also a popular local find though.

 

 

Southern White-faced Owl in Durban North

© Bart Fokkens

Southern White-faced Owl in Durban North

© Rowan Bartlett

 

 

Gauteng held on to the YELLOW-BELLIED GREENBUL at Walter Sisulu Botanical Gardens until at least Friday.

 

Up in Limpopo, the 2 PINK-BACKED PELICANS were still at Vogelfontein yesterday while another 2 PINK-BACKED PELICANS were found in the Samaria section of Mapungubwe National Park yesterday and were still present there this morning.

 

Into Zimbabwe where the out of range RED-CAPPED ROBIN-CHAT was still at Hippo Pools along the Mazowe River in the Umfurudzi Safari Area, about 150km north-east of Harare, this afternoon.

 

And finally, in Mozambique, the MALAGASY POND HERON was still at Dunes de Dovela yesterday as well.

 

 

Yellow-bellied Greenbul at Walter Sisulu Botanical Gardens

© Shane Wilken

Pink-backed Pelican at Mapungubwe National Park

© Joe Grosel

 

 

Thank you to all observers who have contributed their records. Please continue to send through any reports of odd birds as well as continued updates on the presence of rarities already previously reported, no matter how mundane you think they may be. Even if you think someone else has probably sent in a report, rather send the report yourself as well. The only way to improve this service and to make it as useful as possible to everyone is if it can be as comprehensive as possible.

 

Kind regards

Trevor

 

TREVOR HARDAKER

Cape Town, South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image001.png
image002.jpg
image003.jpg
image004.png
image005.png
image006.png
image007.png
image008.jpg
image009.jpg
image010.jpg
image011.jpg
image012.jpg
image013.jpg
image014.jpg
image015.jpg
image016.jpg
image017.jpg
image018.jpg
image019.jpg
image020.jpg
image021.jpg
image022.jpg
image023.jpg
image024.jpg
image025.jpg
image026.jpg
image027.jpg
image028.jpg
image029.jpg
image030.jpg
image031.jpg
image032.jpg
image033.jpg
image034.jpg
image035.jpg
image036.jpg
image037.jpg
image038.jpg
image039.jpg
image040.jpg
image041.jpg
image042.jpg
image043.jpg
image044.jpg
image045.jpg
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages