Most popular IDEs for Ruby on Rails development

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Krum Bakalsky

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:24:57 AM3/12/10
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Hi guys,

Can you tell me which are the most popular and widely used IDEs for
Ruby, and for Ruby on Rails development ? According to your
impressions ?
What do you use the most ? Are there different solutions for the
different operating systems ?


Thanks,

Krum.

Ivan Nastyukhin

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:25:55 AM3/12/10
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IDE ? Ruby? What the fuck ?)

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Ivan Nastyukhin

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:34:01 AM3/12/10
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Our , yes, but i prefer textmate, because windows is not os
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On Mar 12, 2010, at 1:32 PM, Krum Bakalsky wrote:

> Maybe notepad is enough for you ? :)

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Michael Pavling

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:34:51 AM3/12/10
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> Are there different solutions for the different operating systems ?

Yes.

> Can you tell me which are the most popular and widely used IDEs for
> Ruby, and for Ruby on Rails development ? According to your
> impressions ?

The Mac guys seem to go for Textmate.
On Ubuntu and Windows I've used Eclipse and Netbeans, and much prefer
Netbeans - been using the last three releases with very few issues. I
found Eclipse a bit lardy and slow - although part of that was the
lower spec of my old PC, and changing to Xubuntu sped it up a bit.

A few years ago I dabbled with Aptana on Windows, and hated it -
couldn't fathom any of the functionality, and might as well have been
using Notepad. Hell - I even used Visual Studio for a while - but
there was no "Integration" with Ruby... and that was just from my
familiarity with it from ASP Classic days.

Of course you can use *any* text editor - but an IDE will speed some
stuff up for you (at the risk of you getting lazy and not knowing what
is going on under the hood - like when running rake tasks, or server
instances).


> IDE ? Ruby? What the fuck ?)

...others prefer to use Vi and Emacs (but they fight amongst
themselves so much, they tend to stay out of the way ;-)

Use whatever tools help you Get Things Done.

Michael Pavling

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:39:37 AM3/12/10
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> Our , yes, but i prefer textmate, because windows is not os

>> IDE ? Ruby? What the fuck ?)

Go on then... in the sliding scale between hardcore text editors (Vi,
Edlin, Emacs) and bloaty IDEs, how can people not consider Textmate to
be closer to an IDE than a text editor?

One of my colleagues at the moment is a Mac Fanboy, and spits and
curses about IDEs and happily sits there batting away with Textmate
and all its "integrated" syntax highlighting and autocomplete
helpers...

Xavier Noria

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Mar 12, 2010, 5:46:02 AM3/12/10
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I use RubyMine (the best one IMO), and TextMate for casual editing.

Franz Strebel

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:08:36 AM3/12/10
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I use Rubymine both on my Linux laptop and my Mac Mini. I find
it much better than Aptana, which I used for about a year.

Frederick Cheung

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:09:01 AM3/12/10
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Seems to me that textmate's bundles offer similar possibilities to
emacs modes or vim scripts (both of which can add syntax highlighting/
autocompletion similar to what textmate supports)

Fred

KARTHIKEYAN RANGASWAMY

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:09:39 AM3/12/10
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Hi,

You can use Instant Rails for Rails development

The recent one is Aptana Studio.But the thing is that this Apatana has inbuilt JDK which takes more space and it will slow down your system.But this Apatana IDE has more features as compared to Instant Rails

Hope this answers your question



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Gianluca Tessarolo

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:17:38 AM3/12/10
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I use Netbeans (www.netbeans.org) since 2000 and I'm very happy (it has
VERY GOOD Ruby/Rails support)

Bigos

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:22:44 AM3/12/10
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I use Quanta on my Linux boxes. It's side pane tree view of file-
system is best thing which always makes me come back to Quanta after
trying other programs. Not to mention that Quanta is a web developers
editor with lots of nice things like all sorts of tag and style
dialogue windows making work easy.

Juanma Uribe

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:55:53 AM3/12/10
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I use Intellij RubyMine or Idea

2010/3/12 Bigos <ruby....@googlemail.com>

Aldric Giacomoni

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Mar 12, 2010, 9:08:00 AM3/12/10
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http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Al_hzYODcgxwdG9tUFhqcVVoUDVaLTlqT2YtNjV1N0E&hl=en

There.. Take a look at this. I am teaching myself Vim, but own a license
for Rubymine. If you're going for RoR, I would heartily recommend
Rubymine for IDEs and Vim otherwise.
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Greg Donald

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Mar 12, 2010, 10:47:18 AM3/12/10
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Robert Walker

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Mar 12, 2010, 10:55:15 AM3/12/10
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Of all the IDE I've used I hate Netbeans the least. But, note that I
don't use any of them for Ruby development. I basically have to use an
IDE for my Java work to keep myself sane. I just can't bring myself to
say that I "like" any of them though.

As for Ruby and Ruby on Rails, I'm a Textmate users. As far as any
debate on whether Textmate could be categorized as an IDE, I don't
really care. All I know is that I find it to be an excellent text editor
for writing code.

The IDEs that constantly popup suggestions for completion actually
drives me a bit nuts. I know a lot of people love that sort of thing.
However, I want a text editor that helps me edit text, and then gets out
of my way so I can write code. I don't need, or want, it to try to write
code for me.

This is what Textmate does for me. I also know a number of developers
that prefer VIM, but for very similar reasons. I could see the appeal of
being able to stick to one tool (a terminal in this case), but I'm still
a lot more comfortable with a terminal window and a Textmate window.

Michael Schuerig

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Mar 12, 2010, 11:04:27 AM3/12/10
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On Friday 12 March 2010, Greg Donald wrote:
> On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 4:24 AM, Krum Bakalsky <kpym...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> > Hi guys,
> >
> > Can you tell me which are the most popular and widely used IDEs for
> > Ruby, and for Ruby on Rails development ? According to your
> > impressions ?
> > What do you use the most ? Are there different solutions for the
> > different operating systems ?
>
> http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg

There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs: find all files in a
project matching a certain, incrementally typed pattern. And activate
this by a single shortcut. Eclipse/Aptana and Textmate do this
exceptionally well, I haven't found this functionality in a similarly
easy and quick way in Emacs. It might be hidden somewhere, please point
it out in case I just didn't find it.

Michael

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http://www.schuerig.de/michael/

Greg Donald

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Mar 12, 2010, 11:50:28 AM3/12/10
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On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Michael Schuerig <mic...@schuerig.de> wrote:
>> http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg
>
> There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs:

There are only missing features until you add them.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.html

Curtis Cooley

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Mar 12, 2010, 11:51:51 AM3/12/10
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I advise using a text editor and command line tools if you are just
learning. An IDE will hide too many important things from you. Plus,
you'll spend time dicking around with the IDE and plugins and just
trying to get it working that you can be spending building your
application or learning Rails and Ruby.

I use Eclipse for Java development. Not because I like it, but because
I've used an IDE my whole Java career and can not do without the
crutch. I've vowed to not restrict myself like that with Ruby and
Groovy.

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Michael Schuerig

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Mar 12, 2010, 1:02:38 PM3/12/10
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On Friday 12 March 2010, Greg Donald wrote:
> On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Michael Schuerig
<mic...@schuerig.de> wrote:
> >> http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg
> >
> > There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs:
> There are only missing features until you add them.
>
> http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.h
> tml

Yes, I know. Over the past 10+ years I've made a few feeble attempts,
however, I never fell as much in love with Emacs and elisp programming
to do anything substantial. So, no, this is not really an option for me.

Sandip Ransing

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Mar 12, 2010, 6:25:51 PM3/12/10
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Vi is my favorite editor on linux (ubuntu karmic koala)
rails.vim plugin adds syntax highlighting and auto indentation support to it.
Installation help click

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IDE.png

shyam mohan

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Mar 13, 2010, 1:55:56 AM3/13/10
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Hi........
 Use VIM
nice editor for rails ....
provides all functionalities to do coding.
 

Regards,
Shyam
+91-9716-18-9650

milandobrota

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Mar 13, 2010, 9:18:47 AM3/13/10
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I use RubyMine. Disabled all plugins I don't use, it does the job for
me.

On Mar 13, 7:55 am, shyam mohan <shyammohankano...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi........
>  Use VIM
> nice editor for rails ....
> provides all functionalities to do coding.
>
> Regards,
> Shyam
> +91-9716-18-9650
>
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 13, 2010 at 4:55 AM, Sandip Ransing <san2...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Vi is my favorite editor on linux (ubuntu karmic koala)
> > rails.vim plugin adds syntax highlighting and auto indentation support to
> > it.

> > Installation help click<http://www.funonrails.com/2010/02/vim-editor-for-ruby-on-rails.html>


>
> > On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 11:32 PM, Michael Schuerig <mich...@schuerig.de>wrote:
>
> >> On Friday 12 March 2010, Greg Donald wrote:
> >> > On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Michael Schuerig
> >> <mich...@schuerig.de> wrote:
> >> > >>http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg
>
> >> > > There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs:
> >> > There are only missing features until you add them.
>
> >> >http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.h
> >> > tml
>
> >> Yes, I know. Over the past 10+ years I've made a few feeble attempts,
> >> however, I never fell as much in love with Emacs and elisp programming
> >> to do anything substantial. So, no, this is not really an option for me.
>
> >> Michael
>
> >> --
> >> Michael Schuerig

> >> mailto:mich...@schuerig.de


> >>http://www.schuerig.de/michael/
>
> >> --
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> >> .
> >> For more options, visit this group at
> >>http://groups.google.com/group/rubyonrails-talk?hl=en.
>
> > --
> > Sandip
>
> > ---
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>
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saideep a.v.s

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Mar 13, 2010, 1:47:05 PM3/13/10
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Already there was a discussion on same topic few days back in the community.. just google before you post any ;)
IDE Discussion


Best Wishes,
Saideep Annadatha


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Victor S

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Mar 13, 2010, 12:54:17 PM3/13/10
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Um, because it's not? Because its easy and fast?

paul h

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Mar 13, 2010, 5:13:58 PM3/13/10
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Hi Krum,

You didn't say which OS you were interested in...

I'm new to RoR (6 months in, so take what want from my comments) and
use Aptana Studio, and before I get all the flames from the Rails
gurus regarding IDE's over command line tools can I just say that it's
because my front end is usually Flex, which, like Aptana is built on
Eclipse, so when I was getting started it seemed natural.

I like the Aptana IDE because it also provides a very simple way of
hooking in to the server. Being new to Rails, and coming from a
Windows background, I like the Graphical UI.

That said, I have always used the Shell for the usual Ruby/Rails/Rake/
Capistrano commands etc, and only really use Aptana Studio as the
editor and nothing more. There is no code hinting to get in the way,
but it will tell me if my syntax is wrong (ie unexpected kEND etc)
which is really all I need.

However, the last six months learning curve has been massive, and I am
moving more and more towards the Shell and away from the Windows UI
norms........so maybe one day I will shout about textmate or vim to do
my editing from the Shell - but not just yet ;)

Paul

Norm Scherer

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Mar 15, 2010, 12:22:02 PM3/15/10
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Greg Donald wrote:
On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Michael Schuerig <mic...@schuerig.de> wrote:
  
http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg
      
There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs:
    
There are only missing features until you add them.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.html

  
Emacs can be made to do anything!

Greg Donald

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Mar 15, 2010, 1:40:22 PM3/15/10
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On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:22 AM, Norm Scherer
<norms...@earthlink.net> wrote:
> There are only missing features until you add them.
>
> http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.html
>
> Emacs can be made to do anything!

And people who shy away from that power aren't really programmers IMO.

IDEs make me touch my mouse way too much. The longer I can keep my
hands directly on the keyboard, the more productive I am. It's not
difficult to understand.

Michael Pavling

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Mar 15, 2010, 3:09:39 PM3/15/10
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On 15 March 2010 17:40, Greg Donald <gdo...@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:22 AM, Norm Scherer wrote:
>> Emacs can be made to do anything!
>
> And people who shy away from that power aren't really programmers IMO.

Good job it's worth a whole 2pence :-/

> IDEs make me touch my mouse way too much.  The longer I can keep my
> hands directly on the keyboard, the more productive I am.  It's not
> difficult to understand.

How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
learn Emacs'? Typically, it would be worth adding "YMMV" to your
previous statement, because other people may find there isn't a direct
correlation between the ratio of their keyboard:mouse contact and
their productivity - I've sat next to people at both extremes; of
typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
keypresses, regardless of their development environment.

(of course, YMMV ;-)

Greg Donald

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Mar 15, 2010, 3:53:42 PM3/15/10
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On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 2:09 PM, Michael Pavling <pav...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> And people who shy away from that power aren't really programmers IMO.
>
> Good job it's worth a whole 2pence :-/

I'll take it. Paypal work?

> How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
> learn Emacs'?

I didn't say it was harder, but you only get what it came
pre-programmed with for the most part. Some of them offer some added
shortcut functionality but nothing anywhere close to the power of
making your own key binding in Lisp.

Another thing is I can start Emacs once and run it until my next
reboot, weeks or months from now. I have to restart Eclipse every few
hours or so. I can start Emacs in a screen and continue my work from
home later in the evening. I can background Emacs and type shell
commands. It's so much more.

IDEs usually have a large memory footprint. Eclipse uses over half a
GB of ram on my system. Emacs uses 13MBs of ram, but that's only
because I have a ton of stuff loaded like ERC, ECB, and Gnus.

> Typically, it would be worth adding "YMMV" to your
> previous statement, because other people may find there isn't a direct
> correlation between the ratio of their keyboard:mouse contact and
> their productivity -

If its your job to write code then just write the code. Are you a
programmer or not?

> I've sat next to people at both extremes; of
> typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
> keypresses,

Yeah, that's the .net people, plugging components together requires
very little typing, and very little programming skills for that
matter.

> regardless of their development environment.
>
> (of course, YMMV ;-)

Yup.

Michael Pavling

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Mar 15, 2010, 4:22:25 PM3/15/10
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On 15 March 2010 19:53, Greg Donald <gdo...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
>> learn Emacs'?
>
> I didn't say it was harder, but you only get what it came
> pre-programmed with for the most part.  Some of them offer some added
> shortcut functionality but nothing anywhere close to the power of
> making your own key binding in Lisp.

You commented that your primary objection to IDEs was that they cause
you to take your fingers off the keyboard - I suggested that it's
possible to navigate through (Ruby) projects all day with little use
of the mouse, and also that some people aren't *that* concerned about
the hassle involved in moving their hand to a different input
mechanism.

<snip swathes of awesome features>

Sure, there's loads of pro's to your favoured development environment
(integrated or not) that cause *you* to experience great productivity;
given the OP's query, that's all valuable input for him (if he ever
comes back to this thread!) but it's a little rude to dismiss people
as 2nd class or worse because of the tools they use, or the fact that
they care less about their RAM use, or shutting down their computer at
night; essentially because they have different priorities to you.

> If its your job to write code then just write the code.

That's certainly what a good corporate coding drone should do. I'm not
one of those; I certainly program, but I'm not a "programmer"
exclusively.

>> I've sat next to people at both extremes; of
>> typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
>> keypresses,
>
> Yeah, that's the .net people, plugging components together requires
> very little typing, and very little programming skills for that
> matter.

Can't comment, I'm afraid, I've no particular exposure with .Net (and
it was not my intention to make a comment about different peoples'
productivity a reference to which language is "better")

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