Re: Digest for rhcoc@googlegroups.com - 4 Messages in 2 Topics

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tom mcmahon

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Oct 19, 2010, 9:21:51 AM10/19/10
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Anders wrote:

    Anders Swanson <anders...@gmail.com> Oct 17 12:03AM -0500 ^
     
    Tom,
     
    In the case of the traffic calming circle in Sedona, were there any other
    indications that it was a bike route, other than the physical infrastructure
    and the painted bike lane? ......such as signs indicating "bike
    boulevard", etc... or "Bike Route X" . .. ..I ask because a comprehensive
    route signage strategy is the next step here. It seems to me that, aside
    from providing benefits for wayfinding, the route signage might help inform
    motorists that a particular street has special significance (if the bike
    lanes weren't enough), perhaps prompting folks to give a little more leeway?

Answer: In Sedona, I recall a few road signs, fairly plain, just showing a white bicycle on a green background (I think). The road surface (made in part with recycled tires - much better for biking and the environment!) and the painted lines were brand new and very bright and clear.  It was the same in Barcelona and Catalonia, although there, the bike lanes were mostly (not exclusively) physically separated lanes. In both places, I was hugely impressed with the drivers. I found them to be very considerate and did not cause me any stress. 

I found the signage in Catalonia was pretty good but could have been better. One trail in particular, from Girona to St Filiu (the end point of the trail), most of the signs in the direction I was riding said St. Filiu (even though there were several towns between me and St Filiu) and gave a distance to St. Filiu. 

I find that, just like a subway line, bike trail signage works best for me if it announces the end point in the direction I am riding. Calling something the Harte Trail, or any other name, does not give me enough information - where am I going? How far away is it? As with all signage, pretty pictures and names do not help, they distract and confuse. We need highly visible, logical, informative signage. I agree with you, Winnipeg really needs a comprehensive bike route signage strategy (all the more important in Winnipeg because of all the gaps in the trails).

On a different note, the bike guide told us that some U.S. states have enacted legislation that requires motorists to stay at least three feet away when passing any cyclist. 

Also, there is an increasing number of "3 feet please" bright yellow jerseys around, especially in the US. Just google 3 feet please to see these. The newspaper articles say these are saving lives, and they are a good way to educate motorists everywhere you bike. 


Tom





On 17-Oct-10, at 3:38 PM, rhcoc+...@googlegroups.com wrote:

    Anders Swanson <anders...@gmail.com> Oct 17 12:03AM -0500 ^
     
    Tom,
     
    In the case of the traffic calming circle in Sedona, were there any other
    indications that it was a bike route, other than the physical infrastructure
    and the painted bike lane? ......such as signs indicating "bike
    boulevard", etc... or "Bike Route X" . .. ..I ask because a comprehensive
    route signage strategy is the next step here. It seems to me that, aside
    from providing benefits for wayfinding, the route signage might help inform
    motorists that a particular street has special significance (if the bike
    lanes weren't enough), perhaps prompting folks to give a little more leeway?

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