How do you keep up with your hand tools?

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Bob Davis

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Aug 23, 2021, 11:53:29 AMAug 23
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This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.

1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.

2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.

3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.

4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.

5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.

Bob

Leon

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Aug 23, 2021, 12:55:23 PMAug 23
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On 8/23/2021 10:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>
> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.

I pull tools as I need them and when I complete that task I put it/them
away in it's designated spot. I try to only put the tools, while in
use, either on my TS or one of my 3 work surfaces.


> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.

Nope

>
> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.

I find that works on 80% of my tools. Tape measures and pencils are
every where.


>
> 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.

Yes, as permanent storage when not in use. I have a tall cabinet of
drawers, almost 6' tall. On its side I have attached magnet tool bars.
I keep frequently used screw drivers, steel rules, and my angle gauge in
that location. JUST below I have my set of Woodpecker edge rules. They
have a rack for storage, there are 4 of them in various lengths. And
the new double square and its cradle will go there too.
That tower of drawers keeps my other measuring devices, sand paper,
Festool clamps for the MFT table etc.
All of my router bits and "stuff" are stored in my router cabinet.

Then I have 2 large tool chests and each drawer is dedicated to a
specific need.

In addition to the tower of drawers and the 2 large tool chests, I have
an under work bench 6 drawer cabinet. And I have a 2 drawer cabinet on
wheels that normally stays under the right side of my TS table. It
houses everything for the TS, including a resting spot for the rip fence
and sacrificial fences.

Next time you come over I'll show you! ;~)


>
> 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>

Oddly my DC remote switch is almost always found on my TS. I try not to
move it far from there regardless of what the DC hose is connected to.

Again, I keep duplicates of pencils and tape measures but not much of
anything else.


John Grossbohlin

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Aug 23, 2021, 1:28:41 PMAug 23
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Retrieve from designated storage place, use, return to designated storage
place. I do not like hunting for tools... That dislike stems from growing up
in a household where tools were often left where they were last used. To
this day I waste more time trying to find tools there than I do using them.
There are a tremendous number of duplicates there (I'm talking tonnage) but
it's still difficult to find the desired tool when you need it! It's so bad
I often bring my own!

"Bob Davis" wrote in message
news:2091b0b7-32f0-4b82...@googlegroups.com...

DJ Delorie

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Aug 23, 2021, 2:09:51 PMAug 23
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Bob Davis <wrober...@gmail.com> writes:
> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal
> shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure
> out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the
> conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I
> just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember.
> Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.

I have a set of shelves on one wall broken into 16"x16" cubbies; each
one has a "purpose", and each one has a pile of related tools in it.
That way I get the organization AND the messy piles :-)

I.e. one spot is "measuring and marking"; one is "fastening", etc.

> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in
> the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's
> place every day or two.

I've also added a bunch of rolling metal wire shelves; one set per
category (like, one for everything "drills", one for "wood lathe
stuff"), one shelf per pile of related things. That way you can bring
the messy piles to where they're needed.

I've also started adding small cabinets at each large machine that has
its own tooling, like the bridgeport has one for collets, endmills, et
al.

> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile
> everything there.

That would be the table saw ;-)

> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As
> soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.

I generally clean up the previous project as part of prepping for the
next project. Putting something away only means you'll need that tool
next.

Scott Lurndal

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Aug 23, 2021, 3:27:21 PMAug 23
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DJ Delorie <d...@delorie.com> writes:
>Bob Davis <wrober...@gmail.com> writes:
>> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal
>> shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure
>> out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the
>> conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I
>> just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember.
>> Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>
>I have a set of shelves on one wall broken into 16"x16" cubbies; each
>one has a "purpose", and each one has a pile of related tools in it.
>That way I get the organization AND the messy piles :-)

I have a set (incl cordless driver) in one of these. Portable and convenient.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001P30BPU

Ed Pawlowski

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Aug 23, 2021, 10:29:21 PMAug 23
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A place for everything etc. .......

When done with a tool it gets put back. In most home shops everything
is only a few steps away. The most frequently used tools are within
reach of the workbench.

Your No. 1 and 2 are time wasters.

#3 makes sense

#4 is the way your shop should be set up. Drill bits, hole saws and
stuff is with the drill press. Even the ones you use in the portable
drill so you know where to look. If your bench is near the wall, peg
board and assorted hangers.

#5 is OK for things like screwdrivers. I have a #2 Phillips in most
rooms of the house too. A few tape measures around too.

Bill

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Aug 23, 2021, 10:51:50 PMAug 23
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On 8/23/2021 11:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:

> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.

Yes, that's what dad politely asked me to do! And as far as waiting a
few days, I've noticed that it can turn into a few weeks (and then
you'll really be "scrambling" and "mumbling").

One of my best examples is when I took apart my lawnmower to replace
it's transmission, being very careful to remember the order that the
various parts came off of the axle. By the time the transmission
arrived in the mail and I found a convenient time to install it, I was
clueless about putting those parts back on the axle (however after quite
a bit of searching online, I was able to track down an appropriate
diagram).

Finding offers to good to pass up, I have permitted myself to have
duplicated needle-nose pliers, so I can have dedicated pair for fishing,
clipping guitar strings, in the bathroom (lol), as well as my toolbox.
In fact, my last purchase at Harbor Freight involved two pair of 10"
needle nose plies, for about $10, and I've already used them a couple of
time for retrieving parts that are dropped in places that are hard to
get to. Admittedly, they are just sitting on a table, but I know where
they are! I guess if something stays in a place for more than a year,
then that's where it goes! : )

In the spirit of DIY, this week I saved my otherwise good suitcase for a
dollar's worth of few sheet metal screws from the big box store. That
gave me an excuse to try out my bolt/screw measurer (they were size 6).
I suspect most people (perhaps not readers here!) would have replaced
the suitcase, but new is not always better. It might be inferred that
it's okay to buy some tools even if you're not exactly sure what you're
going to do with them at the time that you buy them. The 7'x9' tarp I
bought years ago (for another task) from Harbor Freight was *perfect*
for helping to me stain my deck rails this summer. Having a 90-degree
corner, it covered "exactly" what I needed it to cover, no less and no
more. In case you didn't know, the prep for painting deck rails is a
"pain". : ) A good YouTube video taught me how to really and truly
clean a brush of oil based paint/stain. Let me know if you would like a
link. Post here in prior years reminded me to trying to avoid wiping the
paint off the brush--recent posts about "tapping" the brush came just
after I was finished painting the deck. Next time I'll try it! Enough
rambling...thanks for your support! And put the tools back where they
belong when you are done with them---and "get off of my lawn!" : )

Bill

J. Clarke

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Aug 23, 2021, 11:00:22 PMAug 23
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 22:51:46 -0400, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

>On 8/23/2021 11:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
>
>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>
>Yes, that's what dad politely asked me to do! And as far as waiting a
>few days, I've noticed that it can turn into a few weeks (and then
>you'll really be "scrambling" and "mumbling").
>
>One of my best examples is when I took apart my lawnmower to replace
>it's transmission, being very careful to remember the order that the
>various parts came off of the axle. By the time the transmission
>arrived in the mail and I found a convenient time to install it, I was
>clueless about putting those parts back on the axle (however after quite
>a bit of searching online, I was able to track down an appropriate
>diagram).

For this sort of thing your phone is your friend. Buy (or rig) a
support for it and use it to video your disassembly. If you don't
have a phone that will do that, get one, they aren't that expensive
these days.

Bill

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Aug 23, 2021, 11:29:15 PMAug 23
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On 8/23/2021 10:29 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

> #5 is OK for things like screwdrivers.  I have a #2 Phillips in most
> rooms of the house too.  A few tape measures around too.

I have 2 tape measures right here next to my computer. Sometime I'll
grab one on my way to the big box store (in the last week, one was used
to measure a suitcase screw, and a rug).
My dad gave me them over 30 years ago, and I asked "What am I supposed
to do with this?", and he said just take it and you'll find a use for
it. For those of you who are historians, both of them are "ACO" branded.
ACE/ACO used to publish 1-cent coupons weekly! It's my guess that that
is the source of the smaller one, at least. : ) Someone said that
people "live-on in several ways" (I'm omitting the details), and I
derive some personal contentment from believing that.

knuttle

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Aug 24, 2021, 7:45:13 AMAug 24
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On 8/23/2021 11:00 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
> For this sort of thing your phone is your friend. Buy (or rig) a
> support for it and use it to video your disassembly. If you don't
> have a phone that will do that, get one, they aren't that expensive
> these days.
To me it does not seem "aren't that expensive"

The best price on a cell phone cost at least $50 plus about $50/month
for a plan.

That is a lot of money ($600/year) just to have a phone to record the
tear down of the project you are working on.

J. Clarke

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Aug 24, 2021, 8:02:14 AMAug 24
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You only need a "plan" to use the phone to connect to the cellular
network. If you want to use it as a camera you don't need to access
the cell network.

Of course you could just buy a camera but that costs more than a
phone.

G Ross

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Aug 24, 2021, 8:02:16 AMAug 24
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No words of wisdom here, but it's good to see that some of the old
hands are still around.

--
G Ross

Leon

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Aug 24, 2021, 9:56:48 AMAug 24
to Bill
On 8/23/2021 10:29 PM, Bill wrote:
> On 8/23/2021 10:29 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
>
>> #5 is OK for things like screwdrivers.  I have a #2 Phillips in most
>> rooms of the house too.  A few tape measures around too.
>
> I have 2 tape measures right here next to my computer.  Sometime I'll
> grab one on my way to the big box store (in the last week, one was used
> to measure a suitcase screw, and a rug).

I never take my tape measures into a big box store, I use the ones that
they sell.

I'm afraid I will set mine down and then never find it. ;~)

Leon

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Aug 24, 2021, 9:57:15 AMAug 24
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Leon

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Aug 24, 2021, 10:02:22 AMAug 24
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Now yu have an expensive camera that is not being used to irs potential.

Better to simply buy a cheapo digital camera.

Here is one for $7.

https://www.amazon.com/Jinyi-Photography-Intelligence-One-Click-Pink-Pure/dp/B098PK3Y7W/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=digital%2Bcamera&qid=1629813654&sr=8-7&th=1



>
> Of course you could just buy a camera but that costs more than a
> phone.
>

See above.

DerbyDad03

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Aug 24, 2021, 10:19:24 AMAug 24
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On Monday, August 23, 2021 at 10:29:21 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
> On 8/23/2021 11:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
> > This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
> >
> > 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.
> >
> > 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.
> >
> > 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
> >
> > 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.
> >
> > 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
> >
> > Bob
> >
> A place for everything etc. .......
>
> When done with a tool it gets put back. In most home shops everything
> is only a few steps away. The most frequently used tools are within
> reach of the workbench.

That might work for a shop, but that's not usually when/where I "lose"
my tools.

It's times like working on the car, the trailer, a project in the back yard,
garage or house. Especially projects where I'm working in one location
but need to do something in the shop, using the same tools that I was
just using in the "project area". That's when tools get left behind - when I
move from one area to another.

That's how most of my hunting trips take place. Sometimes a tool belt
helps, but sometimes a small job (supposedly no tool belt needed) just
evolves to something bigger and suddenly I'm chasing tools, sometime
from floor to floor.

DerbyDad03

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Aug 24, 2021, 10:24:38 AMAug 24
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I have a faded coffee mug from a start-up company that my dad was
involved with many years ago. It was a passion of his until the day he
died. I also have the beat up hat he always wore while working out in
the sun.

Sometimes he joins me for morning coffee, sometimes he helps me
rake leaves. I miss him.

Bill

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Aug 24, 2021, 11:52:15 AMAug 24
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I have a camera that does video, though I never tried it. It was under
$100 (no monthly fee :) ). My "tracfone" cost $25 every 90 days.
My wife has fancy phone if we need that. I never thought of putting the
camera on a tripod. I just checked and it looks like 1/4" female
threads in plastic in the bottom--it's a "Panasonic Lumix"--a number of
years old but like new). It has more features than I even want it to
have. I like simplicity in a camera! : ) Now that I have it out maybe
I'll look for an excuse to get some use out of it. Thank you for the
suggestions (Mr. Clarke and knuttle)!

k...@notreal.com

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Aug 24, 2021, 12:43:56 PMAug 24
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 11:55:15 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
wrote:

>On 8/23/2021 10:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
>> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>>
>> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.
>
>I pull tools as I need them and when I complete that task I put it/them
>away in it's designated spot. I try to only put the tools, while in
>use, either on my TS or one of my 3 work surfaces.

I'd like to say I do that but my tools get scattered about the work
area until I'm done with a project, which may be weeks, these days.
One of my routers has been sitting on my saw for months, now. I put
the track saw away a little while ago. My excuse (this time) is my
busted arm.
>
>> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.
>
>Nope

Sure, "in my way".
>>
>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>
>I find that works on 80% of my tools. Tape measures and pencils are
>every where.

Don't forget the utility knives. There should be at least one of each
is sight at all times, everywhere in the house. ...and a spare close
by in case I walk away with the first one.
>
>>
>> 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.
>
>Yes, as permanent storage when not in use. I have a tall cabinet of
>drawers, almost 6' tall. On its side I have attached magnet tool bars.
>I keep frequently used screw drivers, steel rules, and my angle gauge in
>that location. JUST below I have my set of Woodpecker edge rules. They
>have a rack for storage, there are 4 of them in various lengths. And
>the new double square and its cradle will go there too.
>That tower of drawers keeps my other measuring devices, sand paper,
>Festool clamps for the MFT table etc.
>All of my router bits and "stuff" are stored in my router cabinet.
>
>Then I have 2 large tool chests and each drawer is dedicated to a
>specific need.
>
>In addition to the tower of drawers and the 2 large tool chests, I have
>an under work bench 6 drawer cabinet. And I have a 2 drawer cabinet on
>wheels that normally stays under the right side of my TS table. It
>houses everything for the TS, including a resting spot for the rip fence
>and sacrificial fences.
>
>Next time you come over I'll show you! ;~)
>
>
>>
>> 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>>
>
>Oddly my DC remote switch is almost always found on my TS. I try not to
>move it far from there regardless of what the DC hose is connected to.

IC epoxy'ed magnets to the back of mine and keep it stuck to the side
of the TS top. I have a TV remote stuck to the side of my bandsaw. ;-)

k...@notreal.com

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Aug 24, 2021, 12:54:25 PMAug 24
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 07:45:06 -0400, knuttle
<keith_...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

>On 8/23/2021 11:00 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
>> For this sort of thing your phone is your friend. Buy (or rig) a
>> support for it and use it to video your disassembly. If you don't
>> have a phone that will do that, get one, they aren't that expensive
>> these days.
>To me it does not seem "aren't that expensive"
>
>The best price on a cell phone cost at least $50 plus about $50/month
>for a plan.

I keep my old ones. I have three, at last count. One is at work
because the cheap IR camera I use needs a phone with a micro-USB
connector. The new ones use USB-C. Adapters don't work.

>That is a lot of money ($600/year) just to have a phone to record the
>tear down of the project you are working on.

You can buy them used and they *don't* need to be connected to a cell
network to work. WiFi and Bluetooth still works. I use them for
radios (satellite and Internet), as well.

k...@notreal.com

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Aug 24, 2021, 12:59:04 PMAug 24
to
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 09:02:13 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
wrote:
WiFi? Bluetooth?

Last I saw $7 > "already have several". You can probably find old
ones, well used, for the asking.
>
>>
>> Of course you could just buy a camera but that costs more than a
>> phone.
>>
>
>See above.

Video?

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:58 PMAug 24
to
"John Grossbohlin" <nospam....@nospam.earthlink.net> on Mon, 23
Aug 2021 13:28:29 -0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>Retrieve from designated storage place, use, return to designated storage
>place.

As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
every thing with it place.

>I do not like hunting for tools... That dislike stems from growing up
>in a household where tools were often left where they were last used.

Another Bossism: if you don't have time to put it away, when are
you going to have time to look for it?

As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
> To this day I waste more time trying to find tools there than I do using them.

Amen. Worse thing is, this is 'my shop', but I've had to move too
many times, so "I know I have one but I can't find it." Which is why
I have two socket sets, and three soldering irons (two still on the
card!) as well as 150% of the needed bench chisels. (Okay, so I kept
finding 'real deals'.)

I haven't had time to unpack and sort, so far too much is going
back in a box and will get sorted out at the new place.

>There are a tremendous number of duplicates there (I'm talking tonnage) but
>it's still difficult to find the desired tool when you need it! It's so bad
>I often bring my own!

Yep.


--
pyotr filipivich
This Week's Panel: Us & Them - Eliminating Them.
Next Month's Panel: Having eliminated the old Them(tm)
Selecting who insufficiently Woke(tm) as to serve as the new Them(tm)

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:58 PMAug 24
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DJ Delorie <d...@delorie.com> on Mon, 23 Aug 2021 14:09:42 -0400 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
>
>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As
>> soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>
>I generally clean up the previous project as part of prepping for the
>next project. Putting something away only means you'll need that tool
>next.

The 80:20 rule - 80% of the project requires 20% of the tools. And
there is putting it "away" and putting it where you will reach for it.

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:59 PMAug 24
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Bob Davis <wrober...@gmail.com> on Mon, 23 Aug 2021 08:53:26 -0700
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:
Everything with its place, every place with its thing.

Of course sometimes I don't have time to put it away, but some how
I'm are going to find the time to look for it?

I want designated shelf spots for power tools, classes of hand
tools, "supplies", etc, so I don't have to rummage around looking for
the tool I need.
I'm becoming convinced I need to make some old fashioned tool
chests, the sort where every thing is no more than two moves from
accessible.

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:59 PMAug 24
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knuttle <keith_...@sbcglobal.net> on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 07:45:06
-0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:
Nothing says you need to have it as a "phone", just as a portable
camera, gizmo, thing. (I used mine as an extension of the desktop for
a long time before I got cell service.)

Or, you can pick up a cheap video camera.

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:59 PMAug 24
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DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 07:19:22 -0700
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>On Monday, August 23, 2021 at 10:29:21 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
>> On 8/23/2021 11:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
>> > This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>> >
>> > 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.
>> >
>> > 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.
>> >
>> > 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>> >
>> > 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.
>> >
>> > 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>> >
>> > Bob
>> >
>> A place for everything etc. .......
>>
>> When done with a tool it gets put back. In most home shops everything
>> is only a few steps away. The most frequently used tools are within
>> reach of the workbench.
>
>That might work for a shop, but that's not usually when/where I "lose"
>my tools.
>
>It's times like working on the car, the trailer, a project in the back yard,
>garage or house. Especially projects where I'm working in one location
>but need to do something in the shop, using the same tools that I was
>just using in the "project area". That's when tools get left behind - when I
>move from one area to another.
Metal detectors or magnetic sweepers for out door projects clean
up.. B-)
>
>That's how most of my hunting trips take place. Sometimes a tool belt
>helps, but sometimes a small job (supposedly no tool belt needed) just
>evolves to something bigger and suddenly I'm chasing tools, sometime
>from floor to floor.

some kind of tool carrier: it all came in this, it all goes back
in this. Of course, how many times do we forget we had one 'out' and
it gets left behind.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 2:57:59 PMAug 24
to
Bill <none...@att.net> on Mon, 23 Aug 2021 23:29:09 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
>On 8/23/2021 10:29 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
>
>> #5 is OK for things like screwdrivers.  I have a #2 Phillips in most
>> rooms of the house too.  A few tape measures around too.
>
>I have 2 tape measures right here next to my computer. Sometime I'll
>grab one on my way to the big box store (in the last week, one was used
>to measure a suitcase screw, and a rug).

I keep a small, slim, Stanley / Ace 10 foot rule in my change
pocket.
Just the thing to have when bargain hunting "Will that fit?"

>My dad gave me them over 30 years ago, and I asked "What am I supposed
>to do with this?", and he said just take it and you'll find a use for
>it. For those of you who are historians, both of them are "ACO" branded.
>ACE/ACO used to publish 1-cent coupons weekly! It's my guess that that
>is the source of the smaller one, at least. : ) Someone said that
>people "live-on in several ways" (I'm omitting the details), and I
>derive some personal contentment from believing that.

Amen.

J. Clarke

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 3:55:48 PMAug 24
to
That 1/4" thread is standard in the photo industry--most tripods and
other camera supports will fit. But do confirm that the tripod etc
has the 1/4" and not the 3/8" that fits some pro equipment.

DerbyDad03

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 5:26:02 PMAug 24
to
That suggests carrying the the tool box everywhere you need to be,
even if all you need is the screwdriver. My arm is tired just thinking
about that. ;-)

DerbyDad03

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 5:28:49 PMAug 24
to
On Tuesday, August 24, 2021 at 2:57:58 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:
> "John Grossbohlin" <nospam....@nospam.earthlink.net> on Mon, 23
> Aug 2021 13:28:29 -0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:
> >Retrieve from designated storage place, use, return to designated storage
> >place.
> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
> every thing with it place.
> >I do not like hunting for tools... That dislike stems from growing up
> >in a household where tools were often left where they were last used.
> Another Bossism: if you don't have time to put it away, when are
> you going to have time to look for it?
>
> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."

My favorite project management phrase:

"The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 8:14:55 PMAug 24
to
DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:28:48 -0700
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:
We're headed in the wrong direction.
Yeah, but we're making good time.

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 9:07:05 PMAug 24
to
"The faster I work the behinder I get."

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 9:08:12 PMAug 24
to
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 17:14:50 -0700, pyotr filipivich
<ph...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:28:48 -0700
>(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>>On Tuesday, August 24, 2021 at 2:57:58 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:
>>> "John Grossbohlin" <nospam....@nospam.earthlink.net> on Mon, 23
>>> Aug 2021 13:28:29 -0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>>> >Retrieve from designated storage place, use, return to designated storage
>>> >place.
>>> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
>>> every thing with it place.
>>> >I do not like hunting for tools... That dislike stems from growing up
>>> >in a household where tools were often left where they were last used.
>>> Another Bossism: if you don't have time to put it away, when are
>>> you going to have time to look for it?
>>>
>>> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
>>> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
>>
>>My favorite project management phrase:
>>
>>"The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."
>
> We're headed in the wrong direction.
> Yeah, but we're making good time.


Not enough time to do it right
but enough time to do it over.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 9:50:13 PMAug 24
to
DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:26:00 -0700
Yep.

Or make up smaller "kits". I've a number of smaller tool bags
dedicated to one category. Unfortunately, that sometimes means, "go
to the Shop, get the other tool bag."
And it adds more points of failure: did I put it away in the right
bag, the wrong bag, or at all?

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 10:50:03 PMAug 24
to
That's my MO, as well. I have one (actually two, one for parts) for
electrical work, one for plumbing (ick), and one for general home
carpentry.

> And it adds more points of failure: did I put it away in the right
>bag, the wrong bag, or at all?

I usually know what sort of work I'm going to be doing and each "kit"
has the hand tools needed for that task. Power tools are added as
needed.

Clare Snyder

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 11:24:00 PMAug 24
to
I often just use the "denim toolbox" - I generally end up finfing
what I'm looking for when I sit down to think about it!!!

Clare Snyder

unread,
Aug 24, 2021, 11:26:58 PMAug 24
to
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 09:02:13 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
wrote:

That POS hardly classifies as a camera!!!

Obsolete cell phones are a dime a dozen and you can "zoom in" for
details.

Leon

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 2:13:27 PMAug 25
to
On 8/24/2021 11:43 AM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
> On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 11:55:15 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
> wrote:
>
>> On 8/23/2021 10:53 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
>>> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember. Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>>>
>>> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's place every day or two.
>>
>> I pull tools as I need them and when I complete that task I put it/them
>> away in it's designated spot. I try to only put the tools, while in
>> use, either on my TS or one of my 3 work surfaces.
>
> I'd like to say I do that but my tools get scattered about the work
> area until I'm done with a project, which may be weeks, these days.
> One of my routers has been sitting on my saw for months, now. I put
> the track saw away a little while ago. My excuse (this time) is my
> busted arm.

I would likely be the same if I did not keep my nose to the grind stone
to finish. I HATE putting away a tool or resetting up for an operation
more than once.



>>
>>> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile everything there.
>>
>> Nope
>
> Sure, "in my way".
>>>
>>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>>
>> I find that works on 80% of my tools. Tape measures and pencils are
>> every where.
>
> Don't forget the utility knives. There should be at least one of each
> is sight at all times, everywhere in the house. ...and a spare close
> by in case I walk away with the first one.

I seldom use a utility knife but I know where mine is. ;~)


>>
>>>
>>> 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a small rolling cabinet.
>>
>> Yes, as permanent storage when not in use. I have a tall cabinet of
>> drawers, almost 6' tall. On its side I have attached magnet tool bars.
>> I keep frequently used screw drivers, steel rules, and my angle gauge in
>> that location. JUST below I have my set of Woodpecker edge rules. They
>> have a rack for storage, there are 4 of them in various lengths. And
>> the new double square and its cradle will go there too.
>> That tower of drawers keeps my other measuring devices, sand paper,
>> Festool clamps for the MFT table etc.
>> All of my router bits and "stuff" are stored in my router cabinet.
>>
>> Then I have 2 large tool chests and each drawer is dedicated to a
>> specific need.
>>
>> In addition to the tower of drawers and the 2 large tool chests, I have
>> an under work bench 6 drawer cabinet. And I have a 2 drawer cabinet on
>> wheels that normally stays under the right side of my TS table. It
>> houses everything for the TS, including a resting spot for the rip fence
>> and sacrificial fences.
>>
>> Next time you come over I'll show you! ;~)
>>
>>
>>>
>>> 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>>>
>>
>> Oddly my DC remote switch is almost always found on my TS. I try not to
>> move it far from there regardless of what the DC hose is connected to.
>
> IC epoxy'ed magnets to the back of mine and keep it stuck to the side
> of the TS top. I have a TV remote stuck to the side of my bandsaw. ;-)

Not a bad idea.... For 14 years I have waited for the day that I suck
up the remote and send it on the 30' route to the impeller of the DC. ;~(

I have not done that yet but I have worn a remote out.

Bob Davis

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 7:05:45 PMAug 25
to
I finally took a hose clamp and locked my dc remote to the table saw. That is working best for me. I never lose it and it is sort of close to the jointer and planer when I need to use the dc for them.

k...@notreal.com

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Aug 25, 2021, 7:33:31 PMAug 25
to
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 13:13:18 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
wrote:

>On 8/24/2021 11:43 AM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
>> On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 11:55:15 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
>> wrote:
>>
<...>
>>> Oddly my DC remote switch is almost always found on my TS. I try not to
>>> move it far from there regardless of what the DC hose is connected to.
>>
>> IC epoxy'ed magnets to the back of mine and keep it stuck to the side
>> of the TS top. I have a TV remote stuck to the side of my bandsaw. ;-)
>
>Not a bad idea.... For 14 years I have waited for the day that I suck
>up the remote and send it on the 30' route to the impeller of the DC. ;~(

You don't have a separator?

>I have not done that yet but I have worn a remote out.

I bought a second for other tools.

DJ Delorie

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 8:07:45 PMAug 25
to
pyotr filipivich <ph...@mindspring.com> writes:
> And there is putting it "away" and putting it where you will reach for
> it.

Heh. My rule is thus: if you lose something, when you finally find it
and use it and it's time to put it "away", the RIGHT place to put it is
the FIRST place you went looking for it.

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 8:31:59 PMAug 25
to
But you'll always find in the last place you look.

DerbyDad03

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 8:54:03 PMAug 25
to
...and the last place you look is where you put it.

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 25, 2021, 11:26:39 PMAug 25
to
That too. It's funny how that works.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:22:12 AMAug 26
to
k...@notreal.com on Wed, 25 Aug 2021 20:31:54 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
So start there the next time.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:22:12 AMAug 26
to
k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:07:01 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
>On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:28:48 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
><teama...@eznet.net> wrote:
>
>>On Tuesday, August 24, 2021 at 2:57:58 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:
>>> "John Grossbohlin" <nospam....@nospam.earthlink.net> on Mon, 23
>>> Aug 2021 13:28:29 -0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>>> >Retrieve from designated storage place, use, return to designated storage
>>> >place.
>>> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
>>> every thing with it place.
>>> >I do not like hunting for tools... That dislike stems from growing up
>>> >in a household where tools were often left where they were last used.
>>> Another Bossism: if you don't have time to put it away, when are
>>> you going to have time to look for it?
>>>
>>> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
>>> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
>>
>>My favorite project management phrase:
>>
>>"The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."
>
>"The faster I work the behinder I get."

You can't make scrap fast enough to turn a prophet. Or to finish
a project.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:22:12 AMAug 26
to
DJ Delorie <d...@delorie.com> on Wed, 25 Aug 2021 20:07:36 -0400 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
Good point.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:22:12 AMAug 26
to
k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:08:08 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
>
>>>> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
>>>> every thing with it place.
>>>>
>>>> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
>>>> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
>>>
>>>My favorite project management phrase:
>>>
>>>"The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."
>>
>> We're headed in the wrong direction.
>> Yeah, but we're making good time.
>
>
>Not enough time to do it right
>but enough time to do it over.

It is going out of here right. Might as well do it right the first
time, than stay late. (We did not get overtime, either.)

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:22:13 AMAug 26
to
k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 22:49:58 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
>
>>>That suggests carrying the the tool box everywhere you need to be,
>>>even if all you need is the screwdriver. My arm is tired just thinking
>>>about that. ;-)
>>
>> Yep.
>>
>> Or make up smaller "kits". I've a number of smaller tool bags
>>dedicated to one category. Unfortunately, that sometimes means, "go
>>to the Shop, get the other tool bag."
>
>That's my MO, as well. I have one (actually two, one for parts) for
>electrical work, one for plumbing (ick), and one for general home
>carpentry.
>
>> And it adds more points of failure: did I put it away in the right
>>bag, the wrong bag, or at all?
>
>I usually know what sort of work I'm going to be doing and each "kit"
>has the hand tools needed for that task. Power tools are added as
>needed.

I'm moving for the umpteenth time. I was still trying to get
every thing assembled so that I can at least have some idea where it
is I should be looking for stuff. Trying to sort and pack. It takes
longer than I expected. Or have.

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:44:15 AMAug 26
to
On Thu, 26 Aug 2021 08:22:08 -0700, pyotr filipivich
<ph...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:08:08 -0400 typed in
>rec.woodworking the following:
>>
>>>>> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
>>>>> every thing with it place.
>>>>>
>>>>> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
>>>>> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
>>>>
>>>>My favorite project management phrase:
>>>>
>>>>"The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."
>>>
>>> We're headed in the wrong direction.
>>> Yeah, but we're making good time.
>>
>>
>>Not enough time to do it right
>>but enough time to do it over.
>
> It is going out of here right. Might as well do it right the first
>time, than stay late. (We did not get overtime, either.)

At one PPOE, I kept complaining to my manager that what the
company/project was doing had zero possibility of working but all of
the groups were marching lock-step to the cliff. His explanation was
that everyone knew that the program was doomed, no one wanted to be
the one to say about the VP's attire. He said, "Would you rather be
run over by a bus today or six months from now.).

That wasn't the only time I ran into that sort of thing. When I joined
another company, I found that they were releasing prototype
motherboard (not computer) for build before the last revision had even
been built, much less debugged. They were making changes without even
knowing where they stood.

Forget about the (short) time I worked in the defense industry. I
worked for a sub on this turkey (and I knew it smelled foul in 2007).

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evmXu3-VUek>

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:54:21 AMAug 26
to
On Thu, 26 Aug 2021 08:22:08 -0700, pyotr filipivich
<ph...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 22:49:58 -0400 typed in
>rec.woodworking the following:
>>
>>>>That suggests carrying the the tool box everywhere you need to be,
>>>>even if all you need is the screwdriver. My arm is tired just thinking
>>>>about that. ;-)
>>>
>>> Yep.
>>>
>>> Or make up smaller "kits". I've a number of smaller tool bags
>>>dedicated to one category. Unfortunately, that sometimes means, "go
>>>to the Shop, get the other tool bag."
>>
>>That's my MO, as well. I have one (actually two, one for parts) for
>>electrical work, one for plumbing (ick), and one for general home
>>carpentry.
>>
>>> And it adds more points of failure: did I put it away in the right
>>>bag, the wrong bag, or at all?
>>
>>I usually know what sort of work I'm going to be doing and each "kit"
>>has the hand tools needed for that task. Power tools are added as
>>needed.
>
> I'm moving for the umpteenth time. I was still trying to get
>every thing assembled so that I can at least have some idea where it
>is I should be looking for stuff. Trying to sort and pack. It takes
>longer than I expected. Or have.

There's never enough time to move. Economics doesn't often allow
months and a piece of one isn't enough unless, perhaps, you're a kid
starting out. From my experience, then it's a one night deal.

I spent time on the really valuable and fragile stuff, then put
everything from each room in its own set of boxes (heavy stuff went in
plastic totes). Then each box could be unloaded in the appropriate
room and I had some chance of finding things that were needed
immediately (cookware, sheets, TV remote, ...).

Puckdropper

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 11:58:24 AMAug 26
to
k...@notreal.com wrote in news:m6odighsj3533ra6r...@4ax.com:
Funny, sometimes I keep looking after I've found it. Guess I'm weird?

(I probably found it and said what else is here? Then did a short cleanup.)

Puckdropper

Leon

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 12:42:27 PMAug 26
to
On 8/25/2021 6:33 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
> On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 13:13:18 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
> wrote:
>
>> On 8/24/2021 11:43 AM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
>>> On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 11:55:15 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
>>> wrote:
>>>
> <...>
>>>> Oddly my DC remote switch is almost always found on my TS. I try not to
>>>> move it far from there regardless of what the DC hose is connected to.
>>>
>>> IC epoxy'ed magnets to the back of mine and keep it stuck to the side
>>> of the TS top. I have a TV remote stuck to the side of my bandsaw. ;-)
>>
>> Not a bad idea.... For 14 years I have waited for the day that I suck
>> up the remote and send it on the 30' route to the impeller of the DC. ;~(
>
> You don't have a separator?

I have never had a need.




Puckdropper

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 12:53:23 PMAug 26
to
Bob Davis <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote in
news:2091b0b7-32f0-4b82...@googlegroups.com:

> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal
> shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure
> out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the
> conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I
> just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember.
> Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>
> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in
> the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's
> place every day or two.

Yes, sometimes.

> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile
> everything there.
>
> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As
> soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.

Create convenient storage. You have to put that screwdriver down
somewhere, why not put it in it's home? A rack on the wall (assuming your
bench abutts it) might be ideal.

I have a small 3D printed screwdriver and pliers box for my model building.
Tools either go there or on my working tray when I set them down. As a
result, I don't lose them too often! (Unless those darn things rolled
under the thing I'm working on.)

> 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used
> tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a
> small rolling cabinet.

Yes. Clamps on a rack, saw blades in a custom drawer next to the saw.

> 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in
> the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>
> Bob

Where I have space, I set up "stations". Each station will have its own
tools, materials focused on the job, etc. An electronics station has the
soldering iron, components, etc. The model repair station has screwdrivers
and pliers. I try hard not to share the tools.

I know it's not always practical. I often build things in the wood shop
that are too big to work for stations (I'd have to have a cutting _room_, a
sanding _room_, a finishing _room_, etc. Cedar_Sonny would have to have a
cutting warehouse, sanding warehouse, finishing warehouse!)

Puckdropper

Leon

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 1:11:25 PMAug 26
to
On 8/26/2021 10:44 AM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
> On Thu, 26 Aug 2021 08:22:08 -0700, pyotr filipivich
> <ph...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
>> k...@notreal.com on Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:08:08 -0400 typed in
>> rec.woodworking the following:
>>>
>>>>>> As my boss phrased it back in '75: Every place with its thing,
>>>>>> every thing with it place.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> As I amended years later: Just because you don't have time to put
>>>>>> it away, doesn't mean I have the time to look for it."
>>>>>
>>>>> My favorite project management phrase:
>>>>>
>>>>> "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up."
>>>>
>>>> We're headed in the wrong direction.
>>>> Yeah, but we're making good time.
>>>
>>>
>>> Not enough time to do it right
>>> but enough time to do it over.
>>
>> It is going out of here right. Might as well do it right the first
>> time, than stay late. (We did not get overtime, either.)
>
> At one PPOE, I kept complaining to my manager that what the
> company/project was doing had zero possibility of working but all of
> the groups were marching lock-step to the cliff. His explanation was
> that everyone knew that the program was doomed, no one wanted to be
> the one to say about the VP's attire. He said, "Would you rather be
> run over by a bus today or six months from now.).

The last "real" job that I had 25 years ago I was the GM for an AC Delco
auto parts distributor. I resigned/retired mostly because of the owners
stupidity. They wanted input from me, I had more expertise, in the
business that we were going after, than them. On new programs and I
would most often tell them why they would not work. They would
implement anyway and I would have been telling them "I told you so"
almost on a weekly basis. So I did not.





Leon

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 1:21:44 PMAug 26
to
So my issue is that what I am looking for is not where I am looking. I
misplaced one of several identical tape measures. My wife and I share a
large desk, 8' long. I told her to keep an eye out for a tape measure
that looks like the one I just sat on the desk.

She picked up the missing tape measure from "her" end of the desk and
sat it in front om me with out saying a word. She moved it 36" to put
it in front of me. I had been looking for it for 3 days. ;~)

DerbyDad03

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 3:05:38 PMAug 26
to
Sure...but you're only talking about cleaning up after a project or the
final use of a tool during the project. I think that many of us lose our
tools *during* the project and can't find it when we need to put one
tool down and pick up another.

e.g. I need a screwdriver.

Let's say I was disciplined and I put it away the last time I used it,
so my tool box is the first place I look. Yep, there it is.

So I use it in the shop. Then I carry it out to the car and use it there.
Then I carry it into the garage and use it there. Now I'm back in the
shop and I've lost it.

The first place I looked was my tool box, but that isn't the last place
I used it, and it wasn't time to put it away, so it's not there. It's lost
and I'm hunting. ;-)

k...@notreal.com

unread,
Aug 26, 2021, 10:34:57 PMAug 26
to
On Thu, 26 Aug 2021 16:53:19 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Bob Davis <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote in
>news:2091b0b7-32f0-4b82...@googlegroups.com:
>
>> This is really directed toward the small to moderate sized personal
>> shop, rather than a commercial shop. I am constantly trying to figure
>> out better ways to work without wasting time. I have come to the
>> conclusion that I waste a huge amount of time looking for the tool I
>> just used an hour ago and laid down somewhere that I cannot remember.
>> Do any of these ideas work for you? All suggestions appreciated.
>>
>> 1. Use tools as needed and pile them up on all horizontal surfaces in
>> the shop, then hunt them down when needed. Put everything back in it's
>> place every day or two.
>
>Yes, sometimes.
>
>> 2. Designate a table or other spot as "return tools here" and pile
>> everything there.
>>
>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As
>> soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>
>Create convenient storage. You have to put that screwdriver down
>somewhere, why not put it in it's home? A rack on the wall (assuming your
>bench abutts it) might be ideal.

That might work or a small shop but walking across the room to put a
screwdriver away after every use isn't likely to happen.
>
>I have a small 3D printed screwdriver and pliers box for my model building.
>Tools either go there or on my working tray when I set them down. As a
>result, I don't lose them too often! (Unless those darn things rolled
>under the thing I'm working on.)
>
>> 4. Create one or two small dedicated spots to keep frequently used
>> tools handy; hangers on a workbench, a shelf under a work bench, a
>> small rolling cabinet.
>
>Yes. Clamps on a rack, saw blades in a custom drawer next to the saw.

Clamps tend to be used or not. One doesn't generally put them down
between use.
>
>> 5. Spend some money on duplicates and place them in key locations in
>> the shop. Remote vacuum switch is an example.
>>
>> Bob
>
>Where I have space, I set up "stations". Each station will have its own
>tools, materials focused on the job, etc. An electronics station has the
>soldering iron, components, etc. The model repair station has screwdrivers
>and pliers. I try hard not to share the tools.
>
>I know it's not always practical. I often build things in the wood shop
>that are too big to work for stations (I'd have to have a cutting _room_, a
>sanding _room_, a finishing _room_, etc. Cedar_Sonny would have to have a
>cutting warehouse, sanding warehouse, finishing warehouse!)

Do you have a set of screwdrivers, wrenches, chisels, etc. in each
room?

pyotr filipivich

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Aug 27, 2021, 12:18:00 PMAug 27
to
k...@notreal.com on Thu, 26 Aug 2021 11:54:15 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:
>
>> I'm moving for the umpteenth time. I was still trying to get
>>every thing assembled so that I can at least have some idea where it
>>is I should be looking for stuff. Trying to sort and pack. It takes
>>longer than I expected. Or have.
>
>There's never enough time to move. Economics doesn't often allow
>months and a piece of one isn't enough unless, perhaps, you're a kid
>starting out. From my experience, then it's a one night deal.
>
>I spent time on the really valuable and fragile stuff, then put
>everything from each room in its own set of boxes (heavy stuff went in
>plastic totes). Then each box could be unloaded in the appropriate
>room and I had some chance of finding things that were needed
>immediately (cookware, sheets, TV remote, ...).

The wife is in charge of the House. She is doing well at that
end.

I have the two outbuildings and the yard. I am not doing so well.
At the point of "pack it, label it 'Study / shop' and pile the boxes."
There is some sorting, mostly of the "how critical is this to move?"
There is much "I can use that or something" and now decades later it's
not making the cut. Electric motors, gizmos, doohickeys, "wood for
projects", and all the rest.

We are both under the illusion that once we get moved, everything
can be unpacked into its proper place, and we will be able to use it
all and "finally" get to those projects. And everything else.

pyotr filipivich

unread,
Aug 27, 2021, 12:18:00 PMAug 27
to
Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com> on Thu, 26 Aug 2021 16:53:19 GMT
typed in rec.woodworking the following:
>
>> 3. "Clean as you go", a motto I saw when doing KP duty in the army. As
>> soon as you finish with a tool, put it back in its place.
>
>Create convenient storage. You have to put that screwdriver down
>somewhere, why not put it in it's home? A rack on the wall (assuming your
>bench abutts it) might be ideal.

Part of industrial layout is to have the tools _at_ the station,
with the one's you use the most on your dominate hand's side. Thus
you can reach the tools you need as you work.
If not, as I said about one layout "Every step I take away from
the work station, is one step closer to the coffee machine."
>
>I have a small 3D printed screwdriver and pliers box for my model building.

Cool. I'm intending to make a bazillion small boxes for mine.

>Tools either go there or on my working tray when I set them down. As a
>result, I don't lose them too often! (Unless those darn things rolled
>under the thing I'm working on.)

:-) one reason to have oval handles, less likely to completely
roll off the work area.