Garage Storage Racks: Pix Of/Ideas For?

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(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 1, 2007, 11:31:51 AM3/1/07
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Has anybody got some pictures of and/or ideas for a garage storage rack to hold
a half-dozen boards?

The one I've got is cobbled together out of 2x4's and doors (for the shelves).
Available height is 77". Wheels - which I have on every cabinet/rack in the
garage - take 2'5"... call it 3.... so usable height would be 74".

Max outside width; let's say 40" - but that's not a religious issue.


What precipitated this little crisis is receipt of a waveski
(http://tinyurl.com/yu3nsj) and the anticipated purchase of a Starboard Carve
144 (a little under 31" wide).


Current rack stores boards laying flat.

I'm thinking storing them on edge might get more boards in a given volume.

Anybody been here?
--
PeteCresswell

bsinclair

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Mar 1, 2007, 2:22:23 PM3/1/07
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Pete,
I use something like this for my surfboards:
http://www.hardcoreboardsports.com/CatalogWallRacks.html

I bought mine at a local surf shop. I think I have a different brand, but
you get the idea. Each rung hold up to 30#.
I use wall mounted ladder hooks for my windsurfers (I don't remove fins for
transport or storage)
bs

"(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote in message
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Bill (NC/ME)

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Mar 1, 2007, 2:28:48 PM3/1/07
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I threw something together with 2x4's as well. This seems to work well
for me. I store things in a trailer now, but left part of the rack in
place. I'll take a picture when I get back after the weekend.

Michael

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Mar 1, 2007, 9:07:30 PM3/1/07
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You can get more boards in a given verticle space if your boards rest
on extended arms (as opposed to a "ladder" construction.) Then you
don't need to leave room for the footstraps to clear as the boards
slide in sideways. (I use this strategy in my van for all but one of
the boards.)

Re stacking them on their sides or an angle vs horizontal, you might
be able to save a few inches with such an alternative placement, but
I've found the convenience of having the boards level (so you can
stash a sail or hardware or whatever on top of the boards while
they're in your garage) is nice to have.

Michael
www.peconicpuffin.com

On Mar 1, 11:31 am, "(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote:

Michael

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Mar 1, 2007, 9:11:02 PM3/1/07
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Here is a rack design that I've always admired...it has the
cantilevered arms to allow tight placement, and the whole thing can be
folded flat if you need to recover the room temporarily for other
purposes:

http://members.shaw.ca/kevin_bartlett_175/plyracks.html


On Mar 1, 11:31 am, "(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote:

Glenn Woodell

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Mar 1, 2007, 10:26:24 PM3/1/07
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Mine is very similar to this. I'm using 4x4s against the wall and 1"
dowel for the arms. Really solid. Mine holds 4 boards and cost very
little to build.

Glenn

On Thu, 1 Mar 2007 09:22:23 -1000, "bsinclair" <x...@hawaii.rr.com>
wrote:

rh

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Mar 1, 2007, 11:04:09 PM3/1/07
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I have not actually done this but I am thinking of doing it. Buy some
adjustable metal shelves that are quite common in the hardware and
lumber yards. Here is a link to a picture of one I found on the
internet: http://www.shopequip.co.uk/admin/uploads/HB09.jpg

The shelf supports come in various lengths and could easily be extended
and padded if required. There are several advantages to using these shelves:

- the upright supports are very easy to fasten to 2x4s in a wall.

- the spacing between horizontal supports is very easy to adjust.

- they are very strong, especially the double notch type

- if you are not using them the horizonatal supports are easy to remove
and store.

- you can also use them for normal shelves if you want to.

You indicated that you like to keep your cabinet/racks mobile by putting
wheels on them. I had that thought also. You could build a mobile double
sided rack by putting 4 wheels on a thick piece of plywood and building
a 'wall' down the center of the plywood. Then fasten the upright shelf
supports to both sides of your wall, clip the horizontal supports in and
you have a mobile double sided storage rack. You can even mount the
wheels outside the perimeter of the plywood and offset upwards with a
bracket to give you a lower and more stable platform.

rh

(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 2, 2007, 8:27:14 AM3/2/07
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Per Michael:

>Here is a rack design that I've always admired...it has the
>cantilevered arms to allow tight placement, and the whole thing can be
>folded flat if you need to recover the room temporarily for other
>purposes:
>
>http://members.shaw.ca/kevin_bartlett_175/plyracks.html

I like that one.

Something else about the cantilevered design occurs to me: it's more
space-efficient in that the boards can be inserted sideways and the width of the
cantilever provides space for footstraps and/or nose rocker. With a ladder
rack, the space between shelves has to accommodate those two aspects of the
board and yet more space is needed for the mechanical strength of the shelves.
--
PeteCresswell

Michael

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Mar 2, 2007, 8:56:11 AM3/2/07
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Yes, hence:

"You can get more boards in a given verticle space if your boards
rest
on extended arms (as opposed to a "ladder" construction.) Then you
don't need to leave room for the footstraps to clear as the boards
slide in sideways. (I use this strategy in my van for all but one of
the boards.) "

:)

Another thought for you: If you travel with your boards finned, set
up the rack so that the boards are staggered left right (as if they
were sailing port and starboard).

dewe...@yahoo.com

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Mar 2, 2007, 9:30:40 AM3/2/07
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This rack is for sideways storage. Cheap, easy to make, works like a
charm. I'll try to post a picture later.

Materials:

2 2x4s, to go vertically on your wall as high or as low as you want

closet rod, 2 pieces per board, 26" more or less depending on the
width of your boards

wood glue

lag bolts and lead shields to attach 2x4s to your wall

foam pipe insulation to cover the rods

Tools

Hole saw for holes in 2x4s to fit closet rod, drill, regular bit the
same size as pilot bit in hole saw


Drill flat side of 2x4s with hole saw with whatever vertical spacing
you want for your boards. The hole saw will only go partway through.
With regular drill bit complete the pilot bit hole through to the
other side, flip 2x4 and complete with hole saw from that side.

Cut the closet rod to the lengths you want, glue one end into hole in
2x4.

Bolt the 2x4s vertically to the wall with horizontal space between at
approx 1/3 and 2/3 the length of your boards.

Slide the foam insulation over the rods.

Your can also screw shelf brackets to the 2x4s to makes shelves for
your sails.


youngwatery

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Mar 2, 2007, 11:49:33 AM3/2/07
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SPEEDRAIL (and some roof rack pads)

http://www.hollaender.com

dewe...@yahoo.com

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Mar 2, 2007, 12:20:23 PM3/2/07
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I couldn't figure out how to post the picture. I guesss I could email
it.

youngwatery

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Mar 2, 2007, 12:22:11 PM3/2/07
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To follow up on the previous post, here's how I used Speed Rail and a
few pieces of pipe...

http://www.stableroad.com/Images/boardroom.jpg

It's adjustable, does not rust... it's the boardroom!

PS - Thanks to Greg Ecker at Xstreamline in San Pedro CA for coming up
with the idea.

youngwatery

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Mar 2, 2007, 12:30:29 PM3/2/07
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Another style (less costly than Speed Rail)

http://www.stableroad.com/Images/mauistyleracks.jpg

rath...@gmail.com

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Mar 2, 2007, 1:42:00 PM3/2/07
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hey, finally somebody found a good use for sponge boards!!! lol j/k

kev

I also figured you could build a rack out of PVC, like I did in my
van. One of the great things about PVC is that it's so easy to work
with if you buy a cheap PVC pipe cutter, and you can do some test
assembly if you're not sure about all your dimensions. And your end
product will be very light. The pipes themselves are very cheap, it's
just the connectors that are expensive. I used 1" pipe, and you can
reinforce this by putting a dowel/closet rod inside the pipe. Most
important is gluing it all together and a diagonal brace which keeps
the whole thing rigid. People are always surprised how rigid my board
rack is. Here's a not-so-good pic:

http://www.kan.org/kevin/pics/myvan/my%20van%20-%202.jpg

rh

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Mar 2, 2007, 2:01:15 PM3/2/07
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youngwatery wrote:
> SPEEDRAIL (and some roof rack pads)
>
> http://www.hollaender.co
I saw an order form on their website but I could not find a price list.

Do you remember how much the fittings on your rack cost?

rh

rath...@gmail.com

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Mar 2, 2007, 3:23:49 PM3/2/07
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you should be able to order this stuff from Xstreamline, too.

http://xstreamline.com/

kev

Dan Weiss

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Mar 2, 2007, 4:08:14 PM3/2/07
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The Speedrail system is superior in materials, but probably not in
price.

Any home center will have 1/2" threaded steel pipe in a variety of
lengths that screw into fittings just like the ones shown on the
Speedrail web page. I used these pipes to build an outdoor rack for 4
boards. Total cost was about $35 as I recall. One nice thing is that
you can rotate each arms independantly from the others. This allows a
wide variety of storage options. When I moved, I simply unscrewed
everything, boxed it up and tossed it into the moving truck along with
everything else. I built a 2x4 rack in my new home, so the pipes
remain packed away.

-Dan

youngwatery

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Mar 2, 2007, 4:14:28 PM3/2/07
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On Mar 2, 10:23 am, ratho...@gmail.com wrote:
> you should be able to order this stuff from Xstreamline, too.
>
As Kev says, try calling Greg or Kathy at XSL - (310) 514-9514. Maybe
they can help. Tell them Rob says hi!

Here's a price list for these types of products I just found on-line.

http://www.nurail.com/s/index.php


J

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Mar 2, 2007, 4:14:49 PM3/2/07
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Hey Kev,

That looks like a nice setup in the van. How long is your longest board
and longest mast. Can you get a pic of the van through the side door??


Thanks,

Jim

jt

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Mar 2, 2007, 8:02:15 PM3/2/07
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Another threaded steel pipe installation. Have you considered
hoisting up above?

The local club used the hardware store threaded steel pipe and female
threaded disk fitting approach mentioned above. At least in a club
setting, we needed to pad the threaded disks or the board rails would
be damaged. Also, screwing some clear flexible plastic tubing over
the protruding threaded pipe ends prevented damage while getting the
boards on and off the racks. I can send photos if this would help.

Alternatively or in addition, have you considered a hoist that lifts
stacked board above the garage door? I use a homemade version of the
Harken Hoister Storage System in my garage in addition to racks
elsewhere. Largest Harken 4-point system will lift 200#. If you have
a high enough ceiling and wanted to, you could hoist an entire car-top
carrier system with boards on it. When you wanted to go, drop the
system on top of the car roof, attach, and drive off.
Harken link:
www.harkenstore.com/uniface.urd/sccyspw1.eShowPage?409Z56LC7FV66&409Z56LC7E77U

Tibi

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Mar 5, 2007, 2:41:07 AM3/5/07
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rath...@gmail.com wrote:

> I also figured you could build a rack out of PVC, like I did in my
> van. One of the great things about PVC is that it's so easy to work

Hi,

What a great idea, I want to try this in my van!
Can you tell us how you made the diagonal brace?
I'm also interested in more pictures.

(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 5, 2007, 7:42:54 PM3/5/07
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Per (PeteCresswell):

>Has anybody got some pictures of and/or ideas for a garage storage rack to hold
>a half-dozen boards?

Thanks to everybody for the input.

I went with the cantilever approach.

Bought some 2x4's and hanger bolts and was going to do it from scratch, but then
I wandered into a local Ikea and the solution was staring me right in the face.
Cost a lot more than 2x4's, but seems tb extremely robust and flexible.

http://tinyurl.com/2hw5ks
--
PeteCresswell

bsinclair

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Mar 6, 2007, 9:14:47 PM3/6/07
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So how do you like the infinity?
Tried that sit down surfing thing a time or two. It's a lot harder than it
looks.

bs
"(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote in message
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(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 7, 2007, 8:03:33 PM3/7/07
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Per bsinclair:

>So how do you like the infinity?
>Tried that sit down surfing thing a time or two. It's a lot harder than it
>looks.

As soon as they told me it would be delayed a few weeks, that 50-60 degree
weather we'd been having stopped and it dropped into the teens and twenties.
Seems like winter's back is broken now, though. I see a few more sporadic cold
days and then 40's/50's slowly warming into spring.

I've only had it in the water twice.

The first day the wind was howling and dead offshore. Just *had* to get it
wet, so I launched at a local inlet and stayed inside - just paddling around
getting a feel for it. I established that it definitely cannot be paddled
upwind into 50-mph gusts. Wound up getting back to my launch though a
combination of tacking, walking, and riding the tide.

Second day the wind had shifted from dead offshore to onshore and had backed to
15-20 mph. Lotta people surfing and I didn't want to go out there and kook on
them, so I stayed inside catching the whitewater and riding it until just before
it re-formed into shore break.

Based on that, the board seems to meet my first requirement - and that's the
ability to ride junk. I even got in a few cutbacks on the face of the soup.
It doesn't have the glide of my WaveWitch, but once on a wave it accelerates
quickly, turns easily, and seems like it can catch almost anything that you'd
call a wave.

This weekend the temps are supposed to rise back into the high forties. With
any luck I'll get another day or two in - maybe on some breaking waves if
there's any kind of swell.

Infinity dropped the ball big time on my spec for the foot wells. I wanted
something with 4" of flat so I could pad them back once I found the sweet spot
leg-length-wise. Instead, they put in two steps - one is either fully extended
in the far step, or kind of squatting in the nearest one. Once work calms
down a little, I'm going to take a drum sander, a ShureForm, some 'poxy, and
some glass and remedy that problem.

Also, this thing is *heavy*... OTOH, it's 9'4" x 26" and I'm probably spoiled by
the ultra-light construction of my StarBoard windsurfing boards. And OTOOH,
I've got a RealWind that's pretty beefy too... maybe it's the hand layup and
conventional glass-over-foam construction.

I'd *love* to be paddling this thing on Kailua bay - riding that break off to
the left looking out at Rabbit Island. If I ever get back there, I think I'll
just forget about windsurfing and take the Infinity and maybe ship my mountain
bike ahead - maybe do Kaena Point on the bike....

--
PeteCresswell

(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 7, 2007, 9:41:52 PM3/7/07
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Per (PeteCresswell):

> my first requirement - and that's the
>ability to ride junk.

If I can do what the guy in the Santa hat is doing I'll be a happy camper - the
other stuff would just be gravy: http://tinyurl.com/34ej3t
--
PeteCresswell

bsinclair

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Mar 8, 2007, 3:46:37 AM3/8/07
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> I'd *love* to be paddling this thing on Kailua bay - riding that break off
> to
> the left looking out at Rabbit Island. If I ever get back there, I think
> I'll
> just forget about windsurfing and take the Infinity and maybe ship my
> mountain
> bike ahead - maybe do Kaena Point on the bike....
>
Makes sense to me. You can always rent a windsurfer.
My wife's sister used to ride her wave ski between the Twin Islands off
Lanikai. Nothing like a long paddle to keep the surfers away.
Stand up paddling seems to be taking off around here, with a host of new
boards from Naish, Angulo and Starboard about to hit the market. You'll
probably have company at your local break soon. New toys that make junk
surf and no wind fun are a good thing.
bs

"(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote in message

news:msmuu2dqikt172gn3...@4ax.com...


> Per bsinclair:
>>So how do you like the infinity?
>>Tried that sit down surfing thing a time or two. It's a lot harder than
>>it
>>looks.
>
> As soon as they told me it would be delayed a few weeks, that 50-60 degree
> weather we'd been having stopped and it dropped into the teens and
> twenties.
> Seems like winter's back is broken now, though. I see a few more
> sporadic cold
> days and then 40's/50's slowly warming into spring.
>

.........
> PeteCresswell


Bill (NC/ME)

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Mar 12, 2007, 4:02:07 PM3/12/07
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http://images21.fotki.com/v632/photos/7/7299/26102/GF6F9212-vi.jpg

My 2-car garage normally houses a VW bug, Volvo wagon and the trailer
you see in the pic. Imagine the rack going to the floor. I had to cut
it up a bit to get the bug to slip under along the back wall and the
trailer along the side. Still, it is strong enough for me to climb up
to get to the top rack.

Note there are a couple of 2x4's that provide some lateral stability.

On Mar 1, 11:31 am, "(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote:

> Has anybody got some pictures of and/or ideas for a garage storage rack to hold
> a half-dozen boards?
>

> The one I've got is cobbled together out of 2x4's and doors (for the shelves).
> Available height is 77". Wheels - which I have on every cabinet/rack in the
> garage - take 2'5"... call it 3.... so usable height would be 74".
>
> Max outside width; let's say 40" - but that's not a religious issue.
>
> What precipitated this little crisis is receipt of a waveski
> (http://tinyurl.com/yu3nsj) and the anticipated purchase of a Starboard Carve
> 144 (a little under 31" wide).
>
> Current rack stores boards laying flat.
>

Bill (NC/ME)

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Mar 12, 2007, 4:10:16 PM3/12/07
to
Looks like Kevin could be a plumber. Nice work!

Will we see you at Windfest at OBX in April?

Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 3:44:41 AM3/21/07
to
Here's a rack system I built. I used 4X4 Douglas Fir uprights, bolted to the
studs. Drilled holes in uprights for threading galvanized pipe couplers into
(Drilled holes undersized, tapered them a bit with a file since coupler
threads have a taper to them.) Then I screwed galvanized pipe nipples to the
couplers,to serve as my rack bars. I covered the pipes with pipe insulation
and protected ends with rubber chair leg cups. This system is sleek in that
it needs no bracing. And if you choose 3/4" pipe it will hold quite a bit of
weight...like lumber and stuff. I made my uprights just the right length to
force fit in there between sill and ceiling structure, and used right angle
brackets as well as lag screws at top and bottom. This thing is as strong as
the wall itself so I don't worry about it toppling over if I load it up with
stuff besides windsurfing boards. I didn't have to do the extra step of pipe
couplers, but I wanted to be able to remove any bars (pipes) in the future
to modify spacing or store big stuff on floor below rack.

http://images22.fotki.com/v754/fileiDnm/8412e/1/1118618/4742809/GalvPipeRacks.jpg


Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 3:58:52 AM3/21/07
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Pete, see how the big wide board goes up high (I used a 30" pipe nipple for
this one). Up there by the ceiling there isn't any worry about having the
bars stick out too far...the car just drives right underneath, even when
loaded with boards on the roof rack, there is clearance. For the lower down
bars I used 24" pipe nipples.


Bill (NC/ME)

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Mar 21, 2007, 10:09:46 AM3/21/07
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Bob, I couldn't get your fotki link to work.

> http://images22.fotki.com/v754/fileiDnm/8412e/1/1118618/4742809/GalvP...


(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 21, 2007, 1:57:55 PM3/21/07
to
Per Bob A.:
>
>http://images22.fotki.com/v754/fileiDnm/8412e/1/1118618/4742809/GalvPipeRacks.jpg
>
Anybody else getting a 404 on that link?
--
PeteCresswell

Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 3:30:41 PM3/21/07
to
Thanks Bill. This is my first time with photo sharing so bear with me. Try
this link.
http://public.fotki.com/shredbob/garage-racks/galvpiperacks.html

If anyone is considering copying my design there are some tricks to drilling
the holes and threading on the couplers. I used a 1" spade bit (assuming
3/4" galvanized pipe nipples to be used) and an inexpensive drill press
(from Northern Tool) for doing the holes. I needed to run a shop vac and
vacuum out wood chips as I was drilling deeply or else the spade bit would
bind up. I'm not sure how well a hand drill would do going through a 4X4 of
dense fir. I then used a rat tail rasp to slightly enlarge the first 2" or
so of the holes to account for the wider part of the nipple (where there are
no threads) that I needed to thread in there . (I used 4" long nipples which
leaves just enough thread sticking out on the near side of the nipple to
attach a galvanized coupler.) The nipple will self thread into the hole. The
fit was pretty tight and I experimented first on some scrap to get the
tightness right in regard to how much I rasped out with my file at the top
2" of the hole. Also it was critical to use soap on the nipple threads to
cut down on friction/heat while pipe wrenching these things in (otherwise
you could literally burn the wood!) and go slowly. To thread, I first put on
a coupler on the near end of the nipple to be threaded. Then I pipe wrenched
the nipple into the wood using the coupler as a gripping point for the pipe
wrench. (With all this leverage this would be a good way to make fire with
no matches if not careful.) Now you've got your coupler affixed to the
upright and you can then thread on whatever pipe nipple length you want for
the rack bar.I covered the joint between the bar pipe and the coupler with
bicycle tubing to keep out any salt water--even though it's all galvanized
in there I wanted to be sure no corrosion set up over time. If you don't
want to do the intermediate step of the couplers you could certainly just
thread the long rack bar nipple directly into the holes in the uprights,
without doing the 4" nipple and coupler interface.


Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 6:36:45 PM3/21/07
to
Pete, see updated link
http://public.fotki.com/shredbob/garage-racks/galvpiperacks.html
I finally found the original thread for this subject (my news reader is not
so great) and see that you already did the Broder pre-made approach. Looks
great.
--Bob

"(PeteCresswell)" <x...@y.Invalid> wrote in message

news:pgs203l7su8eojtg8...@4ax.com...
> Per Bob A.:
> >
>
>http://images22.fotki.com/v754/fileiDnm/8412e/1/1118618/4742809/GalvPipeRac

Bill (NC/ME)

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Mar 21, 2007, 6:33:12 PM3/21/07
to
Bob, if you want to link to a picture on fotki, just click on Share at
the bottom. It will give you valid options. If you try to link to the
original image (the -or image) you'll have issues like that. If you
link to the -vi image things should be okay.

http://images22.fotki.com/v754/photos/1/1118618/4742809/GalvPipeRacks-vi.jpg

On Mar 21, 3:30 pm, "Bob A." <noSpamH...@aol.net> wrote:
> Thanks Bill. This is my first time with photo sharing so bear with me. Try

> this link.http://public.fotki.com/shredbob/garage-racks/galvpiperacks.html

Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 7:59:44 PM3/21/07
to
Ok, hopefully the third time's the charm!
http://images22.fotki.com/v754/photos/1/1118618/4742809/GalvPipeRacks-vi.jpg

There are several photos to view. I'm hoping that by linking to the first
one you'll be able to then navigate to the others.
--Bob

"Bill (NC/ME)" <billbra...@gmail.com> wrote in message
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Bob A.

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Mar 21, 2007, 8:22:37 PM3/21/07
to
To view the photos that document the consruction of the rack system use this
link.

http://public.fotki.com/shredbob/


(PeteCresswell)

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Mar 21, 2007, 7:34:35 PM3/21/07
to
Per Bob A.:

>Pete, see updated link
>http://public.fotki.com/shredbob/garage-racks/galvpiperacks.html
>I finally found the original thread for this subject (my news reader is not
>so great) and see that you already did the Broder pre-made approach. Looks
>great.

I like it. Probably could have done it a lot cheaper with 2x4's and shelf
brackets - but I didn't have a clue what I was doing when I started and I
figured with wood and screws and all, I'd have spent days moving brackets
up-and-down, cutting wood to the wrong length and so-forth.

The uprights were about $25 each and the canti arms were $3.00 each... plus a
few lengths of 1.5" sched 40, some pipe insulation, and a few rolls of
electrical tape...

Liked it enough, in fact, that I bought a couple more poles and a few shelf
brackets and made a set of shelves: http://tinyurl.com/37ayno
--
PeteCresswell

teste...@gmail.com

unread,
Mar 27, 2007, 11:41:53 AM3/27/07
to
All,
While at HomeDepot last weekend I came across another garage rack
idea, and was curious if anyone has tried it.

In the shelving department they had heavy duty vertical shelf
supports. They looked similar to the white slotted supports, but
where bigger and rated at 275 lbs. The longest horizontal support was
24". There were pre-drilled holes that looked like could be used to
attach a 1x2 to extend the shelf far enough to accommodate a formula
board.

Has anyone tried this approach?

CTM

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