The older windsurfer

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Ken Spencer

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
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For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
to continue. Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not
make it practical to continue in the sport? If you've been
able to continue, are there things you've done to extend
your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave
sailing, cutting back on the time on water, etc. Have you
taken any preventative measures like: strength training,
flexibility training, steroids?


Weed Fin

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
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Ken wrote...

I have been sailing for 18 years. I'm pushing
50. Three years ago I had ACL surgery on
my right knee (total of 5 knee operations on the same knee), two years ago
torn rotator cuff
(surgery) all non-windsurfing related.

I'm still out there shredding. My favorite sail
size is 4.7 and down, board size 8'4' and 8'10"
Wave, and wind speed 25+. My philosophy is
I probably have another 10 years of good sailing left (bump+jump), so I'm going
for it.

I wear a knee brace on my knee, and take a
lot of ibuprofen, ibuprofen, ibuprofen. My
body is pain most of the time, but the high from windsurfing is worth it.

At my beach there are a lot of older sailors that can really shred. So my
answer to you is YES. Start now and don't look back. It will change your
philosophy on life. All of a sudden the challenge of climbing that corporate
ladder doesn't mean as much.

NLW TFW NM

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
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Re:"For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
in your 40's, 50's or even beyond?"\

I plan to move to the Gorge as soon as my wife can retire, which will be in
about six years. I presently sail there a few months each year, and hope to
remain a viable Gorge-level sailor for another 15 years. I expect to sail in
the Gorge and at the coast almost year-round, plus trips eldewhere, once I move
there

RE:"As someone who is just getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's
worth it
to continue."

I first tried windsurfing at age 37. It quickly consumed my life, my career,
and much of my income. It displaced three other obsessions (near-pro-level dirt
biking and snowmobiling, plus intermediate skiing), and quickly exceeded their
cost. It's worth it to me in a heartbeat.

Re:"Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not make it practical to continue
in the sport?"

What risk? What injuries? I've lost no time to injuries except for a broken toe
that interfered only with windsurfing. It's the safest sport I've found yet in
many decades of trying many sports. I've gotten hurt worse playing hacky-sack,
volleyball, and CARDS, for God's sake (sprained my back reaching fort a dropped
card, at age 10).

Re:"If you've been able to continue, are there things you've done to extend


your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave sailing, cutting
back on the time on water, etc."

Hell, no! The more I sail, the better I sail, and the harder I sail. I'm always
seeking stronger wind and more hours of wind, and want to get into wave
sailing. Greater ability should EXTEND my sailing "career", because if I ever
reach perfection, I'll stop crashing, which will reduce my odds of injury from
0.00000000174 to 0.00000000173 (ya still gotta drive to the water and walk
across rocks to launch. Of course, if I ever got perfect at it, I'd get bored.

RE:" Have you taken any preventative measures like: strength training,
flexibility training, steroids?"

Preventative? No. Helmet, float/impact vest, and shades accomplish that. I'd
never forgive myself for my stupidity if I ever missed a minute of sailing
because of an injury those items would have prevented.

Strength training? Yes -- every windy day. Or with a winter like this one, with
no wind for four months, I actually picked up some weights so I wouldn't miss
any shred time on the first day the wind resumed. Good thing -- that first day
was six hours on the water in 35-45 mph winds. The lean. muscular "kids"
(anybody under 40) I sail with wear out much sooner than I do -- and they work
out in a gym all year. One competed in quadrathlons not long ago, and likes to
tout his 6% body fat. Strength training? Heck, no, I just EAT like there was no
tomorrow, and usually have more energy than the wind has.

Flexibility training? I'm naturally pretty flexible, so I stretch only the one
muscle that occasionally feels tight -- my left hamstring. But studies have
shown that stretching does nothing measurable in the way of injury prevention.
Just warming up does much more to prevent injuries.

Steroids? You're joking, right? Even if steroids weren't extremely harmful, the
105-pound women I've seen RIPPIN' in 50 mph winds and logo-high swell didn't
need no steenking steroids.

BTW, I'm almost 55, and plan to be sailing into my 80s if my genes allow.

Go for it. Can you think of a BETTER form of exercise to keep you healthy and
vital until your genes screw you to a wheelchair? Running sure ain't it!

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

Nigel Tailyour

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
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as a 50 year old who stated 4 years ago let me tell you that you need have
no worries. Windsurfing will get easier, not harder as you progress.
Technically difficult but not strenuous.
You will be able to sail for hours, without injury. The activity is great
for Cardio-Vascular system , muscle tone and your mental well-being.
Simple stretching exercises before you start, keep WARM, and you will have a
ball.
enjoy,
Ken Spencer wrote in message <358AB145...@vnd.tek.com>...

>For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
>in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just

>getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
>to continue. Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not
>make it practical to continue in the sport? If you've been

>able to continue, are there things you've done to extend
>your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave
>sailing, cutting back on the time on water, etc. Have you

Weed Fin

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
to

<<<For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
to continue.>>>

Ken... One other thing. Remember when you
were a kid, and it was the nite before Chritmas
and Santa was coming. Right!!! you couldn't
sleep. Well my friend, If you get into this sport, you will get that same
feeling when they
are calling for small craft warnings. I do.

Good Luck

Frank Weston

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
to

Ken,

Give it a try for a year. Then if you can quit, do it. If you have the
right stuff, after a year you'll think of this post and laugh.

Thrown out back, broken ribs, fractured scapula, hamstring pull so bad my
whole leg was blue from my butt to my ankle, and I still check the wind
every time I look out a window. My only fear is that I'll have to quit
before I die. BTW, try to avoid sandbars when reaching in 5.0 conditions
or you just may die before you have to quit.

No steroids, but I have been thinking about giving Viagra a try. If I keep
my wife totally satiated, she gives me more time to sail.

Frank Weston

Ken Spencer <ke...@vnd.tek.com> wrote in article
<358AB145...@vnd.tek.com>...


> For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
> in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
> getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it

Michael Chapman

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Jun 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/19/98
to Ken Spencer

Are you in for a ear full. There are a bunch of 50+ who will blow your
ass off. Just wait till the old boy from NM gets you. You need
strength and endurance. Cycle your workouts to meet the sailing.
Weights in the off season and endurance leading up to and durning. I've
got experience with training a broken down 50+ and turning him back into
one the best on the lake. It didn't help me any, I'am still a duffer.
But still can sail as hard and long as any 30 yr old.


Pierre Coupal

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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Gotta be joking.

Me age starts with a 4..., all I do (OK, try) is freestyle in fair to strong
wind, and I certainly don't consider myself an athlete nor fit. There seems
to be a lot of 50-odd out there sailing like anyone else.

I've had major shoulder surgery 15 years ago, debilitating back problems,
and serious knee surgery and problems, and yet none of these interfere with
freestyle, let alone normal, back-and-forth sailing. Surely this is not a
strenuous sport, is it??

Gleshna

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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>
>For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
>in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
>getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
>to continue. Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not
>make it practical to continue in the sport? If you've been
>able to continue, are there things you've done to extend
>your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave
>sailing, cutting back on the time on water, etc. Have you
>taken any preventative measures like: strength training,
>flexibility training, steroids?
>
>

Your body has basically the same strength potential until age 65. At 50 I can
do many things now that I was unfit for as a college gymnasts. We don't have
wind as much as I would like, so I train for longer sessions when it is windy.
Basically this training includes:

rowing
flatwater kayak racing
chinups
rock climbing

Luck,

Bob

Mark Eichman

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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I wouldn't worry about how old you are when considering this sport. At
least three times a week I sail with my 79 year old friend John Sutton. We
both sail
Mistral Equipes here in Lake Don Pedro. John sails with me all the time
untill the wind gets up to about 10mph. He is very hard to stay up with.
Great balance and
has a good feel for the wind. He sails with a 6.0 and I use an 8.5. We
have a blast together!

Mark

Richard Marean Coveney

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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Ken,
I've been doing it since it started, and for the most part, have
suffered few problems. I sail long hours, & am in pain following many sails.
The knees won't take the strain well, and I had to have surgery on one, with
the other a candidate. Back pain (I get Sciatica) can be forestalled with
back exercise.
I used to sail all year. 10 years ago I stopped sailing below 30
degrees. Lately I haven't sailed much in the winter. My Custom Suits don't
fit because of weight gain! I'm not sailing now because of sciatica, but I
got it biking, not sailing. I kayak a lot, as I can do that with sciatica,
and it's good with low wind.
A chiropractor I went to for knees made me quit for a while wile my knee
mended, as did the knee surgeon.

JohnMic

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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All windsurfers are over 40!
Just go down to your local sailing spot and check.
Steroid?,no ws is not a strength thing aerobic fitness is
more important.But if somebody guarantees me it improves ones
sailing .... ok just joking.But any activity like the gym or another sport
that increases your fitness will certainly help your sailing by allowing
you to spend more time on the water.
Anyway the longer you stick with it the easier it gets and
age and fitness become less relevant.
But dont expect results over night it will take many years
of sailing before you can sail for long periods in overpowered conditions
without taking a break.
Injuries? The only injury I've had is another sailor dropping his mast on my
head as I passed him.Beginners can be a health hazard,give them lots of
room.

JohnM
Remove "no spam" for e-mail

Don Heffernan

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Jun 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/20/98
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On Fri, 19 Jun 1998 11:43:17 -0700, Ken Spencer <ke...@vnd.tek.com>
wrote:

>For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
>in your 40's, 50's or even beyond?
>

You will get a bunch of positive responses to this one, but every yes
counts so I will add mine. I started sailing at about your age and
hit the big 50 in August. I don't anticipate slowing down
significantly until I'm in my 70s (bar limiting injuries). I'm in a
marginal wind location (DC), so I'm not pushing the limits like some
of the people you will hear from on this NG, but even here there is
lots of fun to be had.

Don Heffernan
http://www.access.digex.net/~donheff/donheffernan.html

(Pete Cresswell)

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Jun 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/21/98
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Ken Spencer Said

>For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
>in your 40's, 50's or even beyond?

I'm 57, don't have a particularly durable body, and seem to be doing OK.
Common sense helps. There's no doubt in my own mind that if I went out there
and started jumping ocean waves my windsurfing career would soon be cut
short...but then I know another guy my age that's voiced his determination to do
a forward loop this year....and probably will...


-----------------------
Pete Cresswell

Exkraut

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Jun 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/21/98
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where I sail (Isabella), 50 is probably the mean age, we even had a gentleman
who tought his great-grandchildren windsurfing on his 85th birthday - here's to
Fred, who showed most of us how to get older graciously: fair winds, wherever
you are, Fred!!
Eva (50-something)

BDSinclair

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Jun 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/21/98
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Ken
I won't qualify to answer this post until september, none the less...One of the
many odd aspects of this sport:it takes strength to learn, but becomes almost
purely a finesse sport through time. Lots of older sailors around here who
stay dry all day, and are still out on the water when I'm on the beach nursing
my noodle-arms. I plan on joining them some day
bs

Johnny

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Jun 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/21/98
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I too am 50. And after many years, I'm just starting to get my planing
jibes with some reliability. I sail mostly bay chop in 5.2 to 6.5
conditions but I'll still go out when it's windier (my 5 year old 4-0 is
still practically new).

I'm lucky enough to have a job that allows me some flexibility in
putting in my hours so that I can sail when it's windy. I can do it
locally (even though it's not as windy here as some places an hour or
two away) so it's not a burden on my family to have me gone for a couple
or three hours.

My cold weather limit is 40F air. So here in southern New England it's
possible to sail pretty much year round. Last year nothing froze so I
didn't get a chance to try the freeskate a buddy has in storage at my
house.

Go for it.


Mark 'cecil' DeFriest

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Jun 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/22/98
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> Ken Spencer Said
>
> >For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
> >in your 40's, 50's or even beyond?

I'm 46, first started sailing 7 years ago, and my health has improved
substatially. I lost 12 lbs in the first two months, and they've stayed
off. I try to sail 2-3 times a week and am now tackling small waves (6
feet and less) and jumping (but not always sailing away from them).

I find sailing releases the stress of my work while strengthening my body
for the next day's onslaught at work.... to say nothing of the incredible
buzz you get sailing... it's fun!

I hope to continue active sailing for at least two more decades.

--
__ /\ May the wind be at your side
Mark 'Cecil' DeFriest / \_/ \ since it's no good coming
ce...@netspace.net.au / \ from up front or behind
Windsurfing Obsessive \ ___ /
Melbourne Australia \_/ \*/ Windtech 9'4" custom carbon
__ HiTech 8'6" carbon/kevlar
\/ Pryde V8's (6.0, 7.0, 8.5)
Pryde NR's (5.3, 6.0)
http://www.pb.com.au/pb/homes/12000.htm Pryde Combat's (4.7, 4.0)

TomBuckOb2

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Jun 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/22/98
to

Ken:

I'm just about to hit 40 myself and plan on sailing well into my 70's. (the
optimism of youth)

I know many 50 to 70 year old sailors who ride hard and fast and are always out
there with the rest of us.

Don't know their secrets.


Tom O'Brien - Chicago

TomBuckOb2

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Jun 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/22/98
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>One of the
>many odd aspects of this sport:it takes strength to learn, but becomes
>almost
>purely a finesse sport through time.

This is really interesting - and true. I am a perpetual advanced intermediate,
and am just now getting to where I can consistently make my jibes. And guess
what - what was tiring me out was getting back up out of the cold water every
time I fell in.

Harness lines came first, then water starts - both huge energy savers, and now
consistent jibes - and this one is by far the best. Pretty soon I expect
sailing to be completely effortless.

NLW TFW NM

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Jun 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/22/98
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RE:"I know many 50 to 70 year old sailors who ride hard and fast and are always

out
there with the rest of us. Don't know their secrets."

'S no secret.

'S windsurfing.

P Burke

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Jun 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/23/98
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On Fri, 19 Jun 1998 11:43:17 -0700, Ken Spencer <ke...@vnd.tek.com>
wrote:

>For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail


>in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
>getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
>to continue. Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not
>make it practical to continue in the sport? If you've been
>able to continue, are there things you've done to extend
>your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave
>sailing, cutting back on the time on water, etc. Have you
>taken any preventative measures like: strength training,
>flexibility training, steroids?
>

I should go for it.

I started at 56 and have an F2 Lightning World Cup and 295 F2 Xantos
with sails up to 7.5 m and sail on the Teign estuary and on the sea
(English Channel)

I prefer the Xantos but don't sail it very well but put this down to
the variable conditions here. I really need a week in the warm to
master it again.

Afer 15 years, I am used to my fellow sailors getting better than me
(especially if they start at below 20).

My own precautions are:
1. Don't sail anything you can't uphaul - in the end this is less
effort for me than water starting.
2. If you have been sailing hard, stuff yourself with glucose tablets
as my metabolism is probably slow now.
3. If you can't trust yourself to swim as fast as your board can be
blown away from you, use a 2m length of bungee as a leash.

Good luck

Peter Burke

Chris Long

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Jun 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/23/98
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Yes, I'd go along with the stuff about changing your way of life and
corporate ambitions. I'm 43, and been windsurfing since 29 years old. If
I hadn't 'discovered' windsurfing I would probably have a highly
successful career, as it is I'm happy doing what I do, sail throughout
the year in anything from 3.2 to 7m weather. And as NLWTFW NM said, the
more you sail the better you get - long may it last

Christopher Long

Seamus

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Jun 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/23/98
to

Hey there,
Just wanted to add my comments to this string, I don't actually qualify age
wise (I'm 26, last 13 of those on the water), but it's sailors like you who
are an inspiration (and more often than not a wealth of information) to
sailors like me. Since my brother taught me in 85 I have never looked back
and I intend to be doing this into my 90's if possible. I regularily sail
with guys well over 40 who ride just as well as the guys in my age group.
Hell you are in my age group !!
Keep doing it (but stop going past !). Oh and stay off the steroids, keep
life natural !

Seamus.

M. Mardesich

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Jun 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/23/98
to

I just returned from a very windy week in the
Gorge (tent blew away TWICE!) where I was generally
sailing at Celilo. I'd say the median age at that site was
about 45, maximum probably 65. Everyone was
going out in 3.0 - 4.0 conditions an having
a great time. I'm 48 and the only special precautions
that I take now that I didn't 20 years ago is to
take a couple Advil and a methocarbomol
(for back spasms) before I go out. (Well, maybe
I jump a little bit less than I did five
years ago too. Haven't been out in January
for a couple years either. :)

Mike

NLW TFW NM

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Jun 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/23/98
to

Mike --
Another tip: Colilo has the harshest chop of any spot east of Jones Beach, near
the ocean. Next time sail farther east or west for a better sampling of Gorge
conditions. The exception: NW winds, which can blow harder at Celilo than at
any other Gorge location. Still choppy as hell, but it can be a meter stronger
than at other locations.

Alanballow

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Jun 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/24/98
to

The excerpt below is from a Fortune Magazine article called "How the Really
Smart Money Invests"


As restless physically as he is mentally, Fama is a fanatic tennis
player and athlete who rises at dawn to work out in his basement to
blaring Wagner operas. On visits to DFA's California headquarters, he
wears a special beeper that goes off whenever the wind is right for
windsurfing. Once alerted, the 59-year-old Fama packs up his sailboard
and heads for the beach--or if he's stuck in a meeting, he exhorts the
participants to hurry up. Although considered a front-runner for a
Nobel, Fama refuses to shed his curmudgeonly ways, even to compete for
the prize. When well-wishers gently suggested that he might help his
chances by chatting up the Nobel committee, his response was pure Fama:
"If they come over here, I'll chat, but I'm not dragging my behind over
to Sweden."


If anybodu wants to see the whole thing, here's the URL.

http://www.pathfinder.com/fortune/investor/1998/980706/dfa.html

"Love the dolphins," she advised him. "Write by W.A.S.T.E.."

Lee Haefele

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Jul 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM7/5/98
to

Go to Banana River Resort, Cocoa Beach & check out the locals that rent
rack/sail space. This over 60 crew shows up daily & looks GREAT.
Lee Haefele (age 46)

chas...@gmail.com

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Oct 4, 2013, 8:20:03 PM10/4/13
to
66 and trying to decide which drysuit to buy for windsurfing.

delcar...@cfu.net

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Oct 18, 2013, 12:50:12 PM10/18/13
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My first windsurfing was at age 41. At 70 I'm still windsurfing and racing. Yesterday was my 88th time this year. I've never had a serious injury from windsurfing, but I'm a flat-water, longboard sailor & I've never jumped. As I recall my fastest GPS 10 second average was about 20 mph.

Most of the racers in the midwest at the MOWIND events I attend are over 45.

To keep fit for everything my wife & I do a lot of walking plus yoga class twice a week and low impact aerobics twice a week. I think the yoga flexibility might be the most important part of that. And I sail with a windsurfing rig year round, including land sailing on mountain boards in parking lots & snow or ice sailing when that is available.

Windsurfing was invented as board sailing, then evolved into racing, wave sailing, and bump & jump sailing. Each of those four different sports can be a source of joy & excitement.



(PeteCresswell)

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Oct 18, 2013, 1:21:06 PM10/18/13
to
Per delcar...@cfu.net:
> I think the yoga flexibility might be the most important part of that.

+1 - except I quit yoga when certain other problems made it painful.

Beeeeeg regret there.... If anybody middle-age is reading this thread I
would say "Either stick with your flexibility routine or acquire one and
stick with it.".

I think most people take what flexibility they have for granted and have
no idea how much of it can be lost with age/disuse.
--
Pete Cresswell

win...@gmail.com

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Nov 13, 2013, 10:35:43 PM11/13/13
to
62 - windsurfed for 30+ years and still loving it - I reckon its the reason my knees which I trashed playing soccer when I was 20 have not failed.

GB

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Nov 18, 2013, 2:58:37 PM11/18/13
to
On Friday, June 19, 1998 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, Ken Spencer wrote:
> For you older windsurfers(40+), how realistic is it to sail
> in your 40's, 50's or even beyond? As someone who is just
> getting into the sport at age 40 I wonder if it's worth it
> to continue. Do the injuries or risk of injuries just not
> make it practical to continue in the sport? If you've been
> able to continue, are there things you've done to extend
> your careers like sailing in lower wind conditions, no wave
> sailing, cutting back on the time on water, etc. Have you
> taken any preventative measures like: strength training,
> flexibility training, steroids?

I started windurfing 20 years ago at age 50. I still get out and sail from a 3.8 to a 6.5 on a short board. There's is accidents with any sport but I would say windsurfing would be on the low end with very few.

You'll struggle until you get the technicals down, then, it's almost as easy as riding a bicycle unless you are doing extreme stuff in the ocean.
Windsurfing doesn't bother my bad back but I do need to carry my rig and board separately to the water.

I suggest to go to a place like Bird Island Corpus Christi, Tx and spend a week or two there. Take lessons and rent their gear.
Learn to get in a harness and water start. Go two or three times before you buy gear. There is so much variation in euipment, that if you don't know what to get and get set up right to start with you won't learn the sport or enjoy it.
Message has been deleted

josephagut...@gmail.com

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Nov 29, 2015, 9:44:10 PM11/29/15
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ArtLaffer. I started windsurfing 30 years ago at age 38. Now 68 and retired in the tropics, I sail at every opportunity during our sailing season, which extends from November to May. My aspiration is to sail until I am age eighty. Changes I have noticed over the years are an inability to stay out as long as I once could without becoming exhausted. Also, I find that, instead of resorting to brute strength, I'm more apt to avail of a less strenuous means of accomplishing a maneuver e.g. draining the water from a 10.4 sail before uphauling it. Also, whereas before I was a cambered big sail man, I am discovering the virtues of smaller, RAF sails, precisely positioned.
I was never a speed demon. The principle attraction of windsurfing for me was to get out in the wind and the wave- experience the wild heart of life. This is not to say that I forsaken my quest for my personal Holy Grail--competence at performing the power jibe. Will that goal be forever beyond my grasp? 0nly time will tell.
On the days I am not windsurfing, I find that walking 30 minutes a day has a salutory effect on my endurance on the water. Art Laffer, Subic Bay, Philippines.

dmel...@gmail.com

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Dec 3, 2015, 7:30:49 PM12/3/15
to
I'm 66 and still sailing. I've never been an agressive, wave jumping, blasting the Gorge guy, but have enjoyed local sailing here in northern Michigan and Lac Bay on Bonaire. Just do what you can. Be realistic about your abilities and the conditions. If you're not Laird, don't pretend you are.
Peace man.

carpen...@gmail.com

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Jun 20, 2016, 2:42:43 PM6/20/16
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Jim Drake first windsurfed in May, 1967 at the age of 38. He might have windsurfed in 46 seasons by the time of his death in 2012 at the age of 83. Does anyone know for sure? The people at Starboard would know, but might not be willing to tell.

My goal is to match what I think is Jim Drake's record of 46 seasons. I started at age 41, I'm now 73 and need 13 more seasons (age 86) to have 46 seasons.l

At the USWA Nationals in Corpus Christi, TX in May 2016 the oldest competitor was Joanne Marriott age 77. I was the 2nd oldest. Both of us were in the Kona class. We tied, but she is still a better sailor than I am.

I believe someone, possibly Bruce Matlack has surpassed the 46 seasons mark. Anyone know for sure?

Good winds,
Delburn Carpenter

Bill Burke

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Mar 7, 2022, 2:44:24 PMMar 7
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Male, age 75, started in my early 50's. Windsurf year round, endless summer.

A fit, dedicated person with patience and access to good learning conditions can learn at any age.

Hoping to get more air on my off-the-lips this year.
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