My Southern US trip

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Tashi

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May 17, 2005, 2:02:34 PM5/17/05
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Hey All
just want to update those on my Southern US trip.
heres how it was --short version.
2weeks with my mom and survived that pretty well. Went to KY<TN<
AL<MS<LA<MO
KY-Caving in Mammouth caves KY stayed in Cave City. (only caught in one bad
storm with hail)
TN-Chattanooga (incline RR(sucked), ruby falls, rock city, fresh water
aquarium) Chattanooga more touristy than I thought it would be.
very very beautiful scenery..lush lush forests and cedar trees so dark green
they are just about black. Would be an ulitimate place to retire.
Travelled across northern Alabama (nice scenic trip) to Tupelo
Tupelo MS--saw where Elvis was born, did side trips to Memphis(Graceland)
and Cornish( Shiloh National civil war park) very interesting and nice.
Also did a side trip to Boonsville.
Natchez trace Parkway to Natchez, (Saw 3 antebellum houses, sidetrip to
Vicksbourg(civil war stuff--shiloh was better)
Thibideoux LA-- side trip to Grand Isle(showed mom the ocean)
side trip Zam's swamp tour(the people off of trading spouses) held snakes,
turtles, alligators etc.. went on a swamp tour(mom liked this best out of
the whole trip)
Also checked out a few Antebellum houses and plantations.(Saw Oak
Alley(pic)and Nottingway(pic), toured SanFransico, Laura, and

checked out a walmart supercenter (don't have these in Canada there pretty
cool--steamed seafood right in the store!!)

We then went to New Orleans, checked out the French Quarter, Burbon Street
(same as Whyte Ave here in Edmonton--less stores more trinket-souvenier
shops, more titty bars and peepshows, very neon---wasn't impressed at all)
smaller than whyte ave only 1 car can fit.

checked out---cemetary.. no big thrill for me, seen it all in Haiti.
st. Charles street car..antebellum houses, very nice along St. Charles Ave.
Aquarium(one in TN more impressive however i did get some kick ass pics of a
great white!)
checked out some sidewalk cafes, wax museum, listened to some jazz, went to
the french market and farmers market (total ripoff! mangos like $2.00 each!!
bananas $1.00) Went to the big flea market, repetitive after awhile. and I
think that was it in New Orleans. Oh yeah, went to an awesome seafood
restaurant called Deannies. Not at all impressed with New Orleans.

then we drove down a scenic by-way up the east side of LA West MS. Stayed in
Alexandria then checked out Frogmore Plantation a 1800 cottongin and modern
cottongin, it was pretty cool.
then spent the nite in Greenville MS.
drove to St.Louis MS to return home. on the way did a side trip to Epps
(poverty Point LA where there is this archeological site that I wanted to
see).
all in all, it was a pretty good trip, and I survived unscathed. I
discovered/learned some things not in Canada..
1. Cracker Barrel-I wish they had this in Canada--awesome place.
2. there are alot of BIG people in the southern states and they love to eat.
Made me feel good to see that I'm on the small side of Big there and sad to
see so many huge children. I feel so bad for the kids and the problems that
they are going to have in the future.
3. they serve Mountain size portions.
4.They love Salt!! (had to throw away our food 3x in different restaurants
in different states due to too much salt!)
5. The accents are awesome!
6. Some people talk on the street the same way they talk on Jerry Springer,
I thought it was just an act for TV, wow!
7. Southern Hospitality is awesome. I loved the way people called me "maam"
regardless of their age. You don't see this too much in the bigger places
here in Canada.
8.Although the preservation of Indian burial grounds is prominent in several
States, I was surprised NOT to see many reservations or Native people
themselves.
9.It shocked me that "white" people in the South still refer to black people
as "blacks" ie: "the blackies", "the darkies" "I had one of our black staff
make these", our "black people" did this. I would get the shit kicked out
of me if I did this back home..LOL!!! Me and my mom were trying to figure
out why the older "white" people had to make it known that a "blackie" did
something, or that they did something for the "darkie". I think this
surprised me the most.

All in all the trip was good, and mom enjoyed herself that's what counts.
Will definitly return to do more of my own thing at a later date.

Tashi

--
"When one realizes that life is worthless
he either commits suicide or travels. ~ Edward Dahlberg
LIFE IS AN ATTITUDE!
http://www.globosapiens.net/ta-shy


jcoulter

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May 17, 2005, 2:29:28 PM5/17/05
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"Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in
news:_kqie.1389974$8l.1272700@pd7tw1no:

> 8.Although the preservation of Indian burial grounds is prominent in
> several States, I was surprised NOT to see many reservations or Native
> people themselves.
>

You can "thank" Andrew Jackson and the US Army for this. In his pre
president days he was one kick butt Indian relocator pretty well cleared
the Indians out of the Southern US except in Florida where he just couldn't
corner those pesky Seminoles. You will find Cherokee in NC but IIRC they
have come back from Oklahoma where most of the Cherokee were relocated.

--
Joseph Coulter
Cruises and Vacations
http://www.josephcoulter.com/

Bill Pittman

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May 17, 2005, 2:36:56 PM5/17/05
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In article <_kqie.1389974$8l.1272700@pd7tw1no>,
"Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:

> 9.It shocked me that "white" people in the South still refer to black people
> as "blacks" ie: "the blackies", "the darkies" "I had one of our black staff
> make these", our "black people" did this. I would get the shit kicked out
> of me if I did this back home..LOL!!! Me and my mom were trying to figure
> out why the older "white" people had to make it known that a "blackie" did
> something, or that they did something for the "darkie". I think this
> surprised me the most.

You must be pretty young; that is, younger than about 40! I worked in LA
in the late 1950's, and the whole region was as racist/segregated as you
could get. That has only changed gradually since passage of the civil
rights laws in the late 1960's.

Frank F. Matthews

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May 17, 2005, 3:20:41 PM5/17/05
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jcoulter wrote:
> "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in
> news:_kqie.1389974$8l.1272700@pd7tw1no:
>
>
>
>
>>8.Although the preservation of Indian burial grounds is prominent in
>>several States, I was surprised NOT to see many reservations or Native
>>people themselves.
>>
>
>
> You can "thank" Andrew Jackson and the US Army for this. In his pre
> president days he was one kick butt Indian relocator pretty well cleared
> the Indians out of the Southern US except in Florida where he just couldn't
> corner those pesky Seminoles. You will find Cherokee in NC but IIRC they
> have come back from Oklahoma where most of the Cherokee were relocated.
>


If you go west toward the point you will find folks who were too far
back in the woods to find.

Gregory Morrow

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May 17, 2005, 7:59:04 PM5/17/05
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Bill Pittman wrote:

> You must be pretty young; that is, younger than about 40! I worked in LA
> in the late 1950's, and the whole region was as racist/segregated as you
> could get. That has only changed gradually since passage of the civil
> rights laws in the late 1960's.


I'm only 51 and I remember seeing "colored only" drinking fountains, etc.
when visiting the South in the early 60's...

--
Best
Greg


Hatunen

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May 17, 2005, 9:17:25 PM5/17/05
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On Tue, 17 May 2005 23:59:04 GMT, "Gregory Morrow"
<gregorymorrowEMERGENCY...@earthlink.net>
wrote:

I don't know what constitutes "the South" but I also saw such
signs in kentucky when I lived there in the 1960s, notably in
Franfkort.

And in the 1950s the sign was still up at the edge of at least
one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling
black people to not let the sun set on them. While Ohio was not
legally segregated in the 1950s, it was certainly de facto
segregated.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (hat...@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *

Tashi

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May 17, 2005, 11:32:54 PM5/17/05
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First of all I would like to thanx Niles and Dan for helping me plan my
trip.. Hats off to you both.
Yes, I'm younger than 40 but where I grew up and from my gallavanting
around Canada, I have never experienced what I saw in the South.
The most rednecked place in Canada is Alberta and moreso Edmonton, and yes
there is alot of racism here but it is geared to immigrants regardless of
race. It was just somewhat of surprise for me to hear it from people like
it's no big thing. Just like when we went to the plantations and the person
telling the story of the past was trying to convince us that the
"blacks/darkies" liked being slaves.(Frogmore). blew my mind. It's like
saying the Natives enjoyed being rounded up and put on Reserves.

What does this mean? "the sign was still up at the edge of at least


one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling
black people to not let the sun set on them"

Icono Clast

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May 18, 2005, 7:09:44 AM5/18/05
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Bill Pittman wrote:

> "Tashi" wrote:
>> It shocked me that "white" people in the South still refer to
>> black people as "blacks"
>
> the late 1950's, and the whole region was as racist/segregated as
> you could get. That has only changed gradually since passage of
> the civil rights laws in the late 1960's.

Hatunen said:
> While Ohio was not legally segregated in the 1950s, it was
> certainly de facto segregated.

I have met more flaming racists from Ohio than any other state. Last
time I said that here, there was a discussion that I don't care to
repeat.

You might find reading "The (New!) South"
< http://geocities.com/iconoc/Articles/TheSouth.html > at the site at
Right in the sig worth your while.
___________________________________________________________________
A San Franciscan who's visited 49 of 50 US states.
< http://geocities.com/dancefest/ >-< http://geocities.com/iconoc/ >
ICQ: < http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098103 > ---> IClast at SFbay Net

Frank F. Matthews

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May 18, 2005, 1:54:28 PM5/18/05
to

Tashi wrote:

> First of all I would like to thanx Niles and Dan for helping me plan my
> trip.. Hats off to you both.
> Yes, I'm younger than 40 but where I grew up and from my gallavanting
> around Canada, I have never experienced what I saw in the South.
> The most rednecked place in Canada is Alberta and moreso Edmonton, and yes
> there is alot of racism here but it is geared to immigrants regardless of
> race. It was just somewhat of surprise for me to hear it from people like
> it's no big thing. Just like when we went to the plantations and the person
> telling the story of the past was trying to convince us that the
> "blacks/darkies" liked being slaves.(Frogmore). blew my mind. It's like
> saying the Natives enjoyed being rounded up and put on Reserves.

One interesting thing in Louisiana is to read the histories of some
black owned slave plantations. It really rumbles the race thing. They
had all gone by the Civil War I think.

Frank F. Matthews

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May 18, 2005, 1:57:10 PM5/18/05
to

Icono Clast wrote:

> Bill Pittman wrote:
>
>> "Tashi" wrote:
>>
>>> It shocked me that "white" people in the South still refer to
>>> black people as "blacks"
>>
>>
>> the late 1950's, and the whole region was as racist/segregated as
>> you could get. That has only changed gradually since passage of
>> the civil rights laws in the late 1960's.
>
>
> Hatunen said:
>
>> While Ohio was not legally segregated in the 1950s, it was
>> certainly de facto segregated.
>
>
> I have met more flaming racists from Ohio than any other state. Last
> time I said that here, there was a discussion that I don't care to repeat.
>

One thing to remember is that most racism is about folks who you do not
know. Members of the group who you do know are always different. In
the south there was always more cross racial contact. The north was
more separate.

Jame...@gmail.com

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May 18, 2005, 3:20:15 PM5/18/05
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> I remember seeing "colored only" drinking fountains, etc.
> when visiting the South in the early 60's...

Yes, I had the same experience.


>when we went to the plantations and the person
>telling the story of the past was trying to convince
>us that the "blacks/darkies" liked being slaves.

It would certainly be shocking and offensive to hear a tour guide (or
anyone) say that.

In fact, it would be so offensive that any tour guide saying those
things would offend numerous people daily by it and it would generate
enormously bad publicity for the place. So I'm wondering if maybe the
words weren't spoken as racial slurs, but rather were used in an
explanation of the attitudes of the 1800s. Or, perhaps this was a
plantation where employees dressed in costume and acted and spoke in
the manner of people in the 1800s in the interest of historical
accuracy. I've been to places like that where the actors said all
kinds of things that people today would never say, but they did so in
order to accurately reflect how people spoke in those days.

Jim

Hatunen

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May 18, 2005, 4:55:24 PM5/18/05
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On Wed, 18 May 2005 03:32:54 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca>
wrote:

>What does this mean? "the sign was still up at the edge of at least
>one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling
>black people to not let the sun set on them"

It was a "sundown town"; there were many in the USA, and not just
in The South. Any Black person found in town after sunset would
find themself in trouble (see, e.g., the movie "Heat of the
Night". In fact, I recall a recent documentary on them on the
History Channel or somesuch. Amazon has a book on the subject,
"Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of Segregation in America".

Hatunen

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May 18, 2005, 4:59:48 PM5/18/05
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On Wed, 18 May 2005 17:57:10 GMT, "Frank F. Matthews"
<frankfm...@houston.rr.com> wrote:

>
>
>Icono Clast wrote:
>
>> Bill Pittman wrote:
>>
>>> "Tashi" wrote:
>>>
>>>> It shocked me that "white" people in the South still refer to
>>>> black people as "blacks"
>>>
>>>
>>> the late 1950's, and the whole region was as racist/segregated as
>>> you could get. That has only changed gradually since passage of
>>> the civil rights laws in the late 1960's.
>>
>>
>> Hatunen said:
>>
>>> While Ohio was not legally segregated in the 1950s, it was
>>> certainly de facto segregated.
>>
>>
>> I have met more flaming racists from Ohio than any other state. Last
>> time I said that here, there was a discussion that I don't care to repeat.
>>
>One thing to remember is that most racism is about folks who you do not
>know. Members of the group who you do know are always different. In
>the south there was always more cross racial contact. The north was
>more separate.

In the North it was, "Black man, go as high as you like but don't
come too close".

In the South it was, "Black man, come as close as you like but
don't go too high".

When I was young in Ohio very few whites knew any Black people at
all, but in the South almost every white person knew Black
people, to the point where many whites had black wet nurses.

But familiarity breeds, um, something or other. There were a lot
more lynching parties in the South than the North.

Nile

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May 18, 2005, 7:20:01 PM5/18/05
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>>>First of all I would like to thanx Niles and Dan for helping me plan
my trip.

You're very welcome!


>>>Also did a side trip to Boonsville.

What'd you do there?


>>>went on a swamp tour(mom liked this best out of the whole trip)

I usually find that a nature jaunt is the best part of a vacation.


>>>checked out a walmart supercenter (don't have these in Canada

You can have ours!


>>>Not at all impressed with New Orleans.

Right. Moral of the story for future travellers: Unless you're
specifically going there to party, New Orleans is best seen in the
neighborhoods, specifically the Garden District or the
Frenchmen/Esplanade side. That includes watching the parades. The
French Quarter is for just an evening's, or a daytime, visit. Get
through the first couple of blocks on Bourbon Street fast, and you'll
find it's much better.

>>>All in all the trip was good, and mom enjoyed herself that's what
counts.

Glad you had a good time!

Alan S

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May 18, 2005, 10:46:42 PM5/18/05
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On Wed, 18 May 2005 18:20:01 -0500,
Eb_the_...@webtv.net (Nile) wrote:

>Right. Moral of the story for future travellers: Unless you're
>specifically going there to party, New Orleans is best seen in the
>neighborhoods, specifically the Garden District or the
>Frenchmen/Esplanade side. That includes watching the parades. The
>French Quarter is for just an evening's, or a daytime, visit. Get
>through the first couple of blocks on Bourbon Street fast, and you'll
>find it's much better.

I stayed three nights, in the Garden District (in a seedy
but comfortable apartment on the corner of First and St
Charles IIRC).

We used the tram and buses to get around, enjoyed Canal St,
the French Quarter, the wonderful little unknown back-street
restaurants, the ride on the Natchez - and had a great time.

Of course it's glitzy and touristy. But then, we were
tourists:-)


Cheers, Alan, Australia

Tashi

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May 19, 2005, 12:26:06 AM5/19/05
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Boonsville.
Mom said that it was named for or something like Daniel Boone started the
town, she thought there might be something relating to that. We never saw
anything interesting there.


Hatunen

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May 19, 2005, 1:27:07 PM5/19/05
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On Thu, 19 May 2005 04:26:06 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca>
wrote:

>

Ther are a lot of Boonsvilles/Boonesvilles in the USA; which are
you talking about?

Tashi

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May 19, 2005, 1:15:14 PM5/19/05
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MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.

--
"When one realizes that life is worthless
he either commits suicide or travels. ~ Edward Dahlberg
LIFE IS AN ATTITUDE!
http://www.globosapiens.net/ta-shy

"Hatunen" <hatu...@cox.net> wrote in message
news:62jp819qmj4048hb4...@4ax.com...

Hatunen

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May 19, 2005, 2:49:59 PM5/19/05
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On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca>
wrote:

>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.

Daniel Boone was a Virginian who explored Kentucky (then part of
Virginia). Boone County KY is named for Daniel Boone.

Davey Crockett was from Tennessee.

There are Boonvilles in, e.g., Missouri, New York and Indiana.
But generally places named for Daniel Boone are spelled
Booneville. Even then one can't be certain old Dan'l was
involved. For instance for Booneville Arkansas,

"There is no clear, authenticated record of how Booneville got
its name, but a romantic blending of fact and legends leads one
to believe that it was named for Lt. B. L. E. DeBonneville, and
that the spelling was inadvertently changed. Another belief is
that the city is named in honor of Daniel Boone, since Boone was
accompanied from the east to Kentucky by his cousin, Gen.
Benjamin Logan, one member of the Logan family for whom the
county was named."

Jame...@gmail.com

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May 19, 2005, 4:29:16 PM5/19/05
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>Unless you're specifically going there to party,
>New Orleans is best seen in the neighborhoods...

>French Quarter is for just an evening's, or a
>daytime, visit.  

I agree; folks sometimes visit it on an evening or weekend, react
negatively to all the partying they see, and leave with a bad taste in
their mouths. But there's actually a lot to see and do in the French
Quarter even if you aren't into the bar scene.

There's great jazz, good restaurants, lots of interesting shops, the
Voodoo Museum, interesting architecture, the cathedal, and much more.
But if you (like me) aren't into the bar scene, it's best to visit it
on a weekday during daylight hours, when the atmosphere is a lot
calmer. :)

Jim

Jame...@gmail.com

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May 19, 2005, 4:41:45 PM5/19/05
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Just to be clear, in the post I just made I was *trying* to say that I
agreed with the sentiment that there is much to see and do in New
Orleans besides the French Quarter. The Garden District, for example,
is wonderful.

However, I don't think people should shortchange the French Quarter
just because it can get rowdy there. There's a lot to see and do there,
but just avoid it evenings and weekends if you want to avoid the party
atmosphere.

Jim

Claim Guy

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May 19, 2005, 11:31:10 PM5/19/05
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"Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote in message
news:_kqie.1389974$8l.1272700@pd7tw1no...


All in all, you sound like someone who should stay home.

You're an embarrassment to Canadians and you won't have any idea why I am
saying that.


Tashi

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May 19, 2005, 11:56:31 PM5/19/05
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so please enlighten me..

--
"When one realizes that life is worthless
he either commits suicide or travels. ~ Edward Dahlberg
LIFE IS AN ATTITUDE!
http://www.globosapiens.net/ta-shy

"Claim Guy" <porthos_...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:-YCdndcSKae...@rogers.com...

Edward Strauss

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May 20, 2005, 2:49:56 AM5/20/05
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We do suffer tourists from time to time down here. Kind of like playing
to your expectations, giving you something to talk about. Road signs,
the old bypass roads, plenty is still left of the old dual systems.
Should of asked the questions while you were here. What words would you
like used to explain it to you??

B Vaughan

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May 20, 2005, 9:16:24 AM5/20/05
to
On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:

>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.

Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.

--
Barbara Vaughan

My email address is my first initial followed by my last name at libero dot it.

Keith W

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May 20, 2005, 9:46:27 AM5/20/05
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"B Vaughan" <m...@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:obor819lda5ua74td...@4ax.com...

> On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>
>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I
>>thought
>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>
> Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
> Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.
>

Tennessee.

Keith

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Tashi

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May 20, 2005, 12:10:42 PM5/20/05
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don't know what your talking about, I never saw any signs that I didn't
understand, should have asked what questions?
If you read the previous posts you would have seen that I was responding to
someone elses remark and inquiring about a "sundown town" as I have never
heard of this term. I would appreciate it if the people making the
assumption that I'm not operating with a full deck (claim guy, strauss) read
previous posts before flapping their gums.

Hatunen

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May 20, 2005, 3:31:22 PM5/20/05
to
On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:16:24 +0200, B Vaughan<m...@privacy.net>
wrote:

>On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>
>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>
>Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
>Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.

Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
The greenest state in the land of the free
Raised in the woods so's he knew ev'ry tree
Kilt him a b'ar when he was only three
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier

Frank F. Matthews

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May 20, 2005, 9:44:35 PM5/20/05
to

Keith W wrote:

> "B Vaughan" <m...@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:obor819lda5ua74td...@4ax.com...
>
>>On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I
>>>thought
>>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>>
>>Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
>>Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.
>>
>
>
> Tennessee.
>
> Keith
>
>


Sorry but Barbara is right.

As to Crockett the State of Tenn. has named a state park as his
birthplace. The area where Crockett was born was explored by Boone so
there is some connection.

Edward Strauss

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May 21, 2005, 4:03:07 AM5/21/05
to
Tashi <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
> don't know what your talking about, I never saw any signs that I didn't
> understand, should have asked what questions?
> If you read the previous posts you would have seen that I was responding to
> someone elses remark and inquiring about a "sundown town" as I have never
> heard of this term. I would appreciate it if the people making the
> assumption that I'm not operating with a full deck (claim guy, strauss) read
> previous posts before flapping their gums.

Below is what you posted.


>Tue, 17 May 2005 23:32:54 rec.travel.usa-canada Thread 80 of 115
>Lines 22 Re: My Southern US trip RespNo 6 of 28
>ta...@nospamshaw.ca Tashi at Shaw Residential Internet

>Yes, I'm younger than 40 but where I grew up and from my gallavanting
>around Canada, I have never experienced what I saw in the South.
>The most rednecked place in Canada is Alberta and moreso Edmonton, and yes
>there is alot of racism here but it is geared to immigrants regardless of
>race. It was just somewhat of surprise for me to hear it from people like
>it's no big thing. Just like when we went to the plantations and the person
>telling the story of the past was trying to convince us that the
>"blacks/darkies" liked being slaves.(Frogmore). blew my mind. It's like
>saying the Natives enjoyed being rounded up and put on Reserves.

>What does this mean? "the sign was still up at the edge of at least
>one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling
>black people to not let the sun set on them"
--

I guess it's easier to "flap your gums" in a newsgroup than to ask
questions and share your opinion with the people that blew your mind.

Keith W

unread,
May 21, 2005, 6:48:52 AM5/21/05
to

"Frank F. Matthews" <frankfm...@houston.rr.com> wrote in message
news:7owje.114293$AE6....@tornado.texas.rr.com...

>
>
> Keith W wrote:
>
>> "B Vaughan" <m...@privacy.net> wrote in message
>> news:obor819lda5ua74td...@4ax.com...
>>
>>>On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I
>>>>thought
>>>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>>>
>>>Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
>>>Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.
>>>
>>
>>
>> Tennessee.
>>
>> Keith
>
>
> Sorry but Barbara is right.
>

Not remembering where he was born is right ?

> As to Crockett the State of Tenn. has named a state park as his
> birthplace. The area where Crockett was born was explored by Boone so
> there is some connection.
>

Try again - I said CROCKETT WAS born in Tennessee.

Keith


Tashi

unread,
May 21, 2005, 10:49:41 AM5/21/05
to
o.k. hopefully to end the thread, since it has boiled down to bickering over
the Boone and Crockett... Thanks again to Dan and Niles for helping me plan
the trip, it was fun.
Thanks to all who gave me their input on the things that I
"discovered/experienced" while there, it cleared a few things up for me.

To Claim guy, still don't know what the heck your talkin' about, and to
Mr.Strauss, I took the remark you made to me "Should of asked the questions

while you were here. What words would you like used to explain it to you??"

as an insult to my intelligence.

the question that you were referring to was in response to Hatunen's post

"And in the 1950s the sign was still up at the edge of at least


one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling

black people to not let the sun set on them. While Ohio was not


legally segregated in the 1950s, it was certainly de facto
segregated."

Am I wrong to inquire about something I don't know about??
Have an awesome day everyone.
ciao
Tashi

Frank F. Matthews

unread,
May 21, 2005, 11:08:30 AM5/21/05
to

Keith W wrote:

It appeared that you were claiming that Boone was from Tenn.


B Vaughan

unread,
May 21, 2005, 12:18:35 PM5/21/05
to
On Fri, 20 May 2005 12:31:22 -0700, Hatunen <hatu...@cox.net> wrote:

>On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:16:24 +0200, B Vaughan<m...@privacy.net>
>wrote:
>
>>On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>>
>>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
>>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>>
>>Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
>>Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.
>
>Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
>The greenest state in the land of the free
>Raised in the woods so's he knew ev'ry tree
>Kilt him a b'ar when he was only three
>Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier

I should have remembered that!

Hatunen

unread,
May 21, 2005, 3:36:33 PM5/21/05
to
On Sat, 21 May 2005 14:49:41 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca>
wrote:

>o.k. hopefully to end the thread, since it has boiled down to bickering over
>the Boone and Crockett... Thanks again to Dan and Niles for helping me plan
>the trip, it was fun.
>Thanks to all who gave me their input on the things that I
>"discovered/experienced" while there, it cleared a few things up for me.
>
>To Claim guy, still don't know what the heck your talkin' about, and to
>Mr.Strauss, I took the remark you made to me "Should of asked the questions
>while you were here. What words would you like used to explain it to you??"
>as an insult to my intelligence.
>
>the question that you were referring to was in response to Hatunen's post
>
>"And in the 1950s the sign was still up at the edge of at least
>one northern Ohio city I am personally familiar with telling
>black people to not let the sun set on them. While Ohio was not
>legally segregated in the 1950s, it was certainly de facto
>segregated."
>
>Am I wrong to inquire about something I don't know about??
>Have an awesome day everyone.

Unfortunately, you failed to quote me in the other post. I knew
who you were asking, and what you were asking about, but it only
confused others.

it is customary in these groups to retain and quote enough of the
other person's message that readers can figure out what you are
talking about.

Frank F. Matthews

unread,
May 21, 2005, 3:38:56 PM5/21/05
to

B Vaughan wrote:
> On Fri, 20 May 2005 12:31:22 -0700, Hatunen <hatu...@cox.net> wrote:
>
>
>>On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:16:24 +0200, B Vaughan<m...@privacy.net>
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>On Thu, 19 May 2005 17:15:14 GMT, "Tashi" <ta...@nospamshaw.ca> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>MS. , did Daniel Boone start all the Boonesvilles in the states? I thought
>>>>he was from Mississippi, same with Davey Crockett.
>>>
>>>Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania. I don't remember where Davey
>>>Crockett was born, but I'm almost certain it wasn't Mississippi.
>>
>>Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
>>The greenest state in the land of the free
>>Raised in the woods so's he knew ev'ry tree
>>Kilt him a b'ar when he was only three
>>Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier
>
>
> I should have remembered that!


Not that media presentations necessarily imply any connection with
reality. As I remember there is a Vietnam war John Wayne film where the
sun sets in the east.


ICl...@jps.net

unread,
May 22, 2005, 3:56:52 AM5/22/05
to
[Lost in cyberspace since 5/21/2005 00:08]

Jame...@gmail.com wrote:

> But there's actually a lot to see and do in the French
> Quarter even if you aren't into the bar scene.
>
> There's great jazz, good restaurants, lots of interesting shops, the
> Voodoo Museum, interesting architecture, the cathedal, and much more.
> But if you (like me) aren't into the bar scene, it's best to visit it
> on a weekday during daylight hours, when the atmosphere is a lot
> calmer. :)


I've enjoyed it just as much regardless of which three o'clock I
happened to be there.
___________________________________________________________________
A San Franciscan who's visited 49 of 50 US states.
< http://geocities.com/dancefest/ >-< http://geocities.com/iconoc/ >
ICQ: < http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098103 > ---> IClast at SFbay Net

Hatunen

unread,
May 22, 2005, 11:37:10 PM5/22/05
to

No, no. That's not it. The ocean was on ther wrong side of Viet
Nam.

Nile

unread,
May 27, 2005, 1:23:30 AM5/27/05
to
Tashi wrote:

>>>Not at all impressed with New Orleans.

The other thread has made me curious: where did you end up staying in
New Orleans?

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