SNORKEL OR NOT?

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Steg

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Jun 7, 2003, 1:05:02 PM6/7/03
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Hi:
I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while diving.
The only reason I can think of to carry one is in case you end up stuck on
the surface with no air left in the tank and the boat is far away. This is
highly unlikely...but is it reason enough?

S


Alan Street

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Jun 7, 2003, 1:17:16 PM6/7/03
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In article <ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com>, Steg <av...@nuvox.net>
wrote:

€Hi:



No

John Francis

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Jun 7, 2003, 1:48:25 PM6/7/03
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Not. I haven't worn a snorkel for over two years, although I always
keep it handy in case there is a reason for using it. Long surface
swims I do on my back. I'm sure some folks dive in conditions that
call for a snorkel though.

JF

http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

suds

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Jun 7, 2003, 2:23:40 PM6/7/03
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"John Francis" <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> wrote in message
news:6794ev04t0jmh1j3l...@4ax.com...

> >
> Not. I haven't worn a snorkel for over two years, although I always
> keep it handy in case there is a reason for using it. Long surface
> swims I do on my back. I'm sure some folks dive in conditions that
> call for a snorkel though.
>

Yep. Rough surface conditions and/or strong current will dictate wearing a
snorkel for me. If I get separated from the boat in rough seas or current,
I prefer to save what's left of my tank for the safety sausage and bc.

Smooth, calm seas and the snorkel stays on the boat. Not for "streamlining"
but just because it's one less thing to carry.


suds


Grumman-581

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Jun 7, 2003, 2:29:28 PM6/7/03
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"Steg" wrote ...

Not really reason enough to carry one on your mask, but carrying one in a
pocket would probably not be totally unacceptable though... If you've got to
carry something that is probably going to be useless, you might as well
carry it somewhere it won't be an entanglement hazard...


Jammer Six

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Jun 7, 2003, 2:49:59 PM6/7/03
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€ Hi:

Nope.

Snorkles are for strokes.

Nail it to a post in your basement.

--
"Let's roll!"
-Todd Beamer, aboard United Airlines flight 93, September 11, 2001

Alan Street

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Jun 7, 2003, 2:52:50 PM6/7/03
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In article <bbtc4n$9mu$2...@216.39.146.232>, Jammer Six
<jam...@invalid.oz.net> wrote:

€In article <ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com>, Steg <av...@nuvox.net>


€wrote:

€€ Hi:
€€ I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while diving.
€€ The only reason I can think of to carry one is in case you end up stuck on
€€ the surface with no air left in the tank and the boat is far away. This is
€€ highly unlikely...but is it reason enough?

€Nope.

€Snorkles are for strokes.


Actually, snorkles are for snorkeling. Even non-strokes occasionally go
snorkeling (but not when diving).

Mark

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Jun 7, 2003, 3:16:22 PM6/7/03
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Thanks to you all for replying to my post.

S


"suds" <sudsysadie@hawaii{is the #1 state for Spam eaters}.rr.com> wrote in
message news:M4qEa.27497$49.10...@twister.socal.rr.com...

Jammer Six

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Jun 7, 2003, 3:48:58 PM6/7/03
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In article <070620031151406365%alan@nonono_irsi.com>, Alan Street
<alan@nonono_irsi.com> wrote:

€ €Snorkles are for strokes.




€ Actually, snorkles are for snorkeling. Even non-strokes occasionally go
€ snorkeling (but not when diving).

[sigh]

OK, snorkles are for strokes and snorkling.

--
"C'mon, you sons of bitches, you want to live forever?"
-Sergeant Major Dan Daly

josh

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Jun 7, 2003, 3:55:15 PM6/7/03
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excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke

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"Jammer Six" <jam...@invalid.oz.net> wrote in message
news:bbtfja$imd$1...@216.39.146.232...


> In article <070620031151406365%alan@nonono_irsi.com>, Alan Street
> <alan@nonono_irsi.com> wrote:
>

> ? ?Snorkles are for strokes.
> ?
> ?
> ? Actually, snorkles are for snorkeling. Even non-strokes occasionally go
> ? snorkeling (but not when diving).

suds

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Jun 7, 2003, 4:10:48 PM6/7/03
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"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote in message
news:ve4glq2...@corp.supernews.com...

> excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
>

A very, very good looking, intelligent person who enjoys diving. Even fat
and ugly people are allowed to be Strokes, as long as they prefer not to be
sheep.


suds


Anthony

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Jun 7, 2003, 4:51:39 PM6/7/03
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"suds" <sudsysadie@hawaii{is the #1 state for Spam eaters}.rr.com> wrote in
message news:cFrEa.28280$49.10...@twister.socal.rr.com...
>You're bad!! A stroke is a diver with an unsafe attitude, altho this
definition has somehow morphed into "a diver who disagrees with me".. As for
snorkels, I have a collapsible one which I carry in my bc pocket when
conditions are somewhat extreme.


Iggy Peuterbaugh

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Jun 7, 2003, 8:32:04 PM6/7/03
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"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote in message
news:ve4glq2...@corp.supernews.com...
> excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke

You don't play golf?

suds

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Jun 7, 2003, 6:45:45 PM6/7/03
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"Anthony" <JAW...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:URycnUv_rYH...@comcast.com...

>
> "suds" <sudsysadie@hawaii{is the #1 state for Spam eaters}.rr.com> wrote
in
> message news:cFrEa.28280$49.10...@twister.socal.rr.com...
> >
> > "josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote in message
> > news:ve4glq2...@corp.supernews.com...
> > > excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
> > >
> >
> > A very, very good looking, intelligent person who enjoys diving. Even
fat
> > and ugly people are allowed to be Strokes, as long as they prefer not to
> be
> > sheep.
> >
> >
> > suds
> >
> >You're bad!!

You don't know the half of it. C|;^)

Tell Ashcroft. If he's wasting time spying on me, maybe other, innocent
civilians won't fall under his gaze. Hell, I'll send the creep pictures of
my breasts if that's what floats his boat.


>A stroke is a diver with an unsafe attitude, altho this
> definition has somehow morphed into "a diver who disagrees with me"..

Oh cut the DIR bullshit. An unsafe diver is an unsafe diver. I've found
ego has the most to do with unsafe diving practices. We can disagree on
plenty and still both be good, safe divers.

As for
> snorkels, I have a collapsible one which I carry in my bc pocket when
> conditions are somewhat extreme.
>

My bc has only one small pocket. With space so limited, I only bring the
snorkel when I deem conditions might merit it.


suds


John Francis

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Jun 7, 2003, 6:35:00 PM6/7/03
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On Sat, 7 Jun 2003 14:55:15 -0500, "josh"
<josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote:

>excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke

Someone who snorkles in dive gear????

JF

http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

John Francis

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Jun 7, 2003, 6:35:55 PM6/7/03
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On Sat, 7 Jun 2003 17:32:04 -0700, "Iggy Peuterbaugh"
<Ig...@nowhere.net> wrote:

>
>"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote in message
>news:ve4glq2...@corp.supernews.com...
>> excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
>
>You don't play golf?

Yes, but my sac is really lousy in golf.

JF


http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

Dan Bracuk

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Jun 7, 2003, 7:51:46 PM6/7/03
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"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> entertained us with:
:excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke

Someone who understands DIR, and rejects it.

Dan Bracuk
Never use a big word when a diminutive one will do.
The Best of Rec.Scuba
http://www.pathcom.com/~bracuk/RecScuba/


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Dan Bracuk

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Jun 7, 2003, 7:52:22 PM6/7/03
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"Steg" <av...@nuvox.net> entertained us with:
:Hi:

Not for me. You have to decide for yourself if it is important enough for you.

John Francis

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Jun 7, 2003, 8:54:23 PM6/7/03
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On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 19:51:46 -0400, Dan Bracuk <NOTb...@pathcom.com>
wrote:

>"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> entertained us with:
>:excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
>
>Someone who understands DIR, and rejects it.
>

Someone who doesn't understand DIR, and rejects it. 8)

JF


http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

Evans Winner

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Jun 8, 2003, 4:28:26 AM6/8/03
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"Steg" <av...@nuvox.net> wrote in message news:<ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com>...

> Hi:
> I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while diving.

Warning: Long tedious post follows.

You can check the Google archives for this newsgroup for lots and lots
and lots and lots on this subject. Since you asked for opinions, but
not expert opinions, I thought I would mention that in all my long,
er, months of diving, I've never needed one. There were a few times
early on when I had one and found it was irritating and in the way,
but I've never actually needed it. If you get used to doing surface
swims on your back it may at first seem strange that you have to
occasionally turn over and look where you're going and take a kind of
mental bering on whatever is in the exact oposite direction, but it
gets second nature pretty quickly. Or rather, since I shouldn't try
to speak for you, I just mean that's what I have found.

I would suspect that they are a pretty real entanglement hazzard in
open water, and I'd never use them in a confined space. Also, the
mouthpiece is right there in the same area as your primary regulator.
I can't think off-hand of any good gory senarios, but on principle I
like the idea of keeping that area fairly clear of junk that gets in
the way of hoses and regulators when you or your buddy might need one.
This is especially true if you already necklace your backup rather
than use an octo. In any case, the things definitely get in the way
for me.

As a side note, people talk about wings tending to pitch you forward
in the water on the surface (as against a jacket-style BC). I
wondered if this would make it harder to surface swim on my back. It
turns out that the wing made it much easier to lay back completely and
minimize drag. Cool. So there's one more point against the need for
a snorkle for me. If you really lay back and relax and zen out you
can cover a lot of ground pretty quickly this way. You don't
re-breathe any air, like with a snorkel. That's if you're on the
move. If you're just sitting there, waiting for a boat or something,
like you mentioned as a possibility, then why do you need or even want
your face in the water anyway? I'd be too busy waiving or shouting or
whistling or something to want to be looking down in the water. And
if you are afraid you can't get your face out of the water then there
are other problems. I personally, between my wing and my drysuit can
just about be out of the water to my stomach if I really need to (okay
I'm slightly exaggerating). If you're diving wet and it's really an
emergency, drop some weight.

You could say that if you absolutely have to have a snorkel then get
one of those that roll or fold up and carry it in a drysuit pocket.
But really that seems like a solution to a non-problem. I know it's
pretty snotty coming from me, but it seems like if one really thinks
one needs a snorkle, then it might be worth it to reconsider the dive
plan or something.

Boy, I sure can go on. Thinking outloud, I guess. The bottom line is
that although I don't have the experience to say that snorkles are
100% useless, and certainly someone could contrive some senario where
they could come in handy, I can say that for me so far they have been
100% useless, and that I have thought of enough good reasons why they
could be actively bad that I would need a damn good reason to carry
one.

-Evans

Lee Bell

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Jun 8, 2003, 7:12:07 AM6/8/03
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Jammer Six wrote

> ? I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while
diving.
> ? The only reason I can think of to carry one is in case you end up stuck
on
> ? the surface with no air left in the tank and the boat is far away. This
is
> ? highly unlikely...but is it reason enough?

1. If you pay any attention at all to accident reports, you know it's not at
all unlikely. It happens pretty regularly, particularly on drift dives.
2. That's not the only reason to have one. If a snorkel is a good idea if
the boat is far away, then it's also a good idea when the ocean or lake
shore is far away, as it usually is on shore dives. While not real common,
dive boats occasionally sink too . . . or leave the site due to an
emergency.
3. At least one agency teaches first aid techniques using a snorkel.
4. Some people kind of like the idea of being able to see what is below
while they move from one point to the next, without using up gas that they
wish to reserve for their arrival at a dive site, or their discovery of
something worth spending gas to look at more closely, or whatever.
5. Spearfishermen often attract the attention of sharks. Personally, I kind
of like being able to keep an eye on a shark while I wait for the dive boat
to come and get me. With a snorkel, I can do it without using gas that I
may need if I have to change the shark's mind about whether my buddy and/or
I qualify as food.

As to whether any of these reasons is enough, that's a personal decision.
Carrying a snorkel has its disadvantages. For most divers, losing the
snorkel is the primary risk. If that were the only one, I'd probably carry
one on all dives. Other risks include getting caught on something,
dislodging a mask inconveniently. That's a major consideration for those
that dive in overhead environments. For those of us who use a long primary
hose, a snorkel on the mask interferes with the deployment of the hose in an
air sharing situation. Some of these risks can be overcome by putting the
snorkel someplace else, but that, in itself, is a bother that some don't
find worth the effort.

Anybody that says "absolutely not" or even hits at the word stroke in a
discussion of this issue is probably not the right person to listen too.
People dove successfully with snorkels for a great many years before groups
started using long hoses on their regulators. Because long hoses and
snorkels don't mix, because divers entering caves are in an overhead
environment and because those diving spring fed caves don't normally risk
long swims back to the boat or shore, snorkels became something to be left
behind. Those whose needs were different, who thought about their
convenience, the diving they do and risks that differ from those who
consider themselves elite became known as strokes. Most of us here are
happy to be strokes. YMMV.

Lee

ps: There are some strokes here that dive caves and even some that agree
with all or most of the choices of those who would call others strokes. Not
all good cave divers are elitists.


Angel

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Jun 8, 2003, 7:16:23 AM6/8/03
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Nice summary of the pros and cons!

"Lee Bell" <lee...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:bbv59r$i9j$1...@slb9.atl.mindspring.net...

Grumman-581

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Jun 8, 2003, 8:24:01 AM6/8/03
to
"Lee Bell" wrote ...
<snip>

Wow, a well written and on-topic comment to a scuba related post... Sorry
Lee, but you'll need to sit in the penalty box for 20 minutes for that type
of behavior around here... <grin>


Greg Mossman

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Jun 8, 2003, 1:58:23 PM6/8/03
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"Angel" <thecomput...@coldmail.com> wrote in message
news:noicnYW-npJ...@veiinternet.net...

> Nice summary of the pros and cons!

Ditto.


Greg Mossman

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Jun 8, 2003, 2:02:23 PM6/8/03
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"Lee Bell" <lee...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:bbv59r$i9j$1...@slb9.atl.mindspring.net...

> 1. If you pay any attention at all to accident reports, you know it's not


at
> all unlikely. It happens pretty regularly, particularly on drift dives.
> 2. That's not the only reason to have one. If a snorkel is a good idea if
> the boat is far away, then it's also a good idea when the ocean or lake
> shore is far away, as it usually is on shore dives. While not real
common,
> dive boats occasionally sink too . . . or leave the site due to an
> emergency.
> 3. At least one agency teaches first aid techniques using a snorkel.
> 4. Some people kind of like the idea of being able to see what is below
> while they move from one point to the next, without using up gas that they
> wish to reserve for their arrival at a dive site, or their discovery of
> something worth spending gas to look at more closely, or whatever.
> 5. Spearfishermen often attract the attention of sharks. Personally, I
kind
> of like being able to keep an eye on a shark while I wait for the dive
boat
> to come and get me. With a snorkel, I can do it without using gas that I
> may need if I have to change the shark's mind about whether my buddy
and/or
> I qualify as food.

6. Kelp crawling. Surface swimming over kelp is much easier in a face down
position. Otherwise, you have to stop every foot or so and clear the
entanglement from your tank and reg. I usually bring enough air on my back
to let me breathe off the reg, but I would probably carry a snorkle if I
wanted to conserve air.


NE333RO

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Jun 8, 2003, 2:51:54 PM6/8/03
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>1. If you pay any attention at all to accident reports, you know it's not at
>all unlikely. It happens pretty regularly,
<snip>

Yep, what he said.

Jerome O'Neil

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Jun 8, 2003, 6:53:07 PM6/8/03
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> Steg" <av...@nuvox.net> wrote in message
news:ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com...

> I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while
diving.

For diving, a snorkle is a dangerous contraption.

For skin diving, they are pretty useful.

--
Submergo ergo sum


Tim Smoot

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Jun 8, 2003, 7:51:08 PM6/8/03
to
No

"Steg" <av...@nuvox.net> wrote in message
news:ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com...
> Hi:

> I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while
diving.
> The only reason I can think of to carry one is in case you end up stuck on
> the surface with no air left in the tank and the boat is far away. This
is
> highly unlikely...but is it reason enough?
>
> S
>
>


Dan Bracuk

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Jun 8, 2003, 9:18:53 PM6/8/03
to
"Jerome O'Neil" <jerome...@yahoo.com> entertained us with:
:For diving, a snorkle is a dangerous contraption.

What makes a snorkel dangerous?

Jerome O'Neil

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Jun 8, 2003, 9:26:28 PM6/8/03
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"Dan Bracuk" <NOTb...@pathcom.com> wrote in message
news:o2o7ev0tp3omrmono...@4ax.com...

> "Jerome O'Neil" <jerome...@yahoo.com> entertained us with:
> :For diving, a snorkle is a dangerous contraption.
>
> What makes a snorkel dangerous?

Entanglement hazard, increased risk of mask flooding when yer in a high
current environment (that "streamlined" thing), often confused with power
inflator, and I want the things designed to deliver air to deliver it no
matter what my depth.

I'm sure theres more, but those are the ones I think of.

-J


Lee Bell

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Jun 8, 2003, 9:38:35 PM6/8/03
to
Greg Mossman wrote

> 6. Kelp crawling. Surface swimming over kelp is much easier in a face
down
> position. Otherwise, you have to stop every foot or so and clear the
> entanglement from your tank and reg. I usually bring enough air on my
back
> to let me breathe off the reg, but I would probably carry a snorkle if I
> wanted to conserve air.

Thanks for keeping me humble. Here I was thinking I'd pretty much covered
the issues and you come along and remind me I'm not as smart as I sometimes
think. It's cool to get two lessons in one, a lesson in diving and another
in humility.


Dan Bracuk

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Jun 8, 2003, 9:46:12 PM6/8/03
to
"Jerome O'Neil" <jerome...@yahoo.com> entertained us with:
:Entanglement hazard, increased risk of mask flooding when yer in a high

:current environment (that "streamlined" thing), often confused with power
:inflator, and I want the things designed to deliver air to deliver it no
:matter what my depth.

Increase mask flooding, I have experinced myself. Not to sure about this
entanglement thing though, in what does a snorkel get entangled?

Alan Street

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Jun 8, 2003, 10:42:27 PM6/8/03
to
In article <8nREa.69393$d51.136862@sccrnsc01>, Jerome O'Neil
<jerome...@yahoo.com> wrote:

€"Dan Bracuk" <NOTb...@pathcom.com> wrote in message


€news:o2o7ev0tp3omrmono...@4ax.com...
€> "Jerome O'Neil" <jerome...@yahoo.com> entertained us with:
€> :For diving, a snorkle is a dangerous contraption.
€>
€> What makes a snorkel dangerous?

€Entanglement hazard,

Yep - fishing line loves snorkles (and tank valves)

€increased risk of mask flooding when yer in a high


€current environment (that "streamlined" thing)

Yep

€, often confused with power
€inflator

By Painter, perhaps. But not by anyone else.


, and I want the things designed to deliver air to deliver it no
€matter what my depth.

That's stretching it a bit.


€I'm sure theres more, but those are the ones I think of.

€-J


Ross

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Jun 8, 2003, 11:00:27 PM6/8/03
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Escuse me, you're going to have to leave this group. Good sense like that
is simply not acceptable....

--
Ross Canant
www.myoldtools.com


"Lee Bell" <lee...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:bbv59r$i9j$1...@slb9.atl.mindspring.net...

Curtis

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Jun 8, 2003, 11:16:32 PM6/8/03
to
"John Francis" wrote

> >
> >Someone who understands DIR, and rejects it.
> >
> Someone who doesn't understand DIR, and rejects it. 8)

Ah, that's closer. ;-)

Curtis


Curtis

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Jun 8, 2003, 11:21:22 PM6/8/03
to
"Dan Bracuk" wrote

> What makes a snorkel dangerous?

It's the one piece of dive equipment considered cheap enough and
disposable enough to use for flogging dumbasses with, even if not quite as
effective as the lean hex rod. :-)

Curtis

suds

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Jun 9, 2003, 12:52:39 AM6/9/03
to

"Curtis" <curtispb$$$@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:t0TEa.28757$ZN3....@fe08.atl2.webusenet.com...

I dive knife is far more effective when it comes to attitude correction.
C|;^{)


suds


Jerome O'Neil

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Jun 9, 2003, 1:02:55 AM6/9/03
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"Dan Bracuk" <NOTb...@pathcom.com> wrote in message
news:hkp7evkebejvifoh7...@4ax.com...

> Increase mask flooding, I have experinced myself. Not to sure about this
> entanglement thing though, in what does a snorkel get entangled?

Monfilament fishing line, usually. It sux!

--
Submergo ergo sum


Jerome O'Neil

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Jun 9, 2003, 1:04:22 AM6/9/03
to
"Alan Street" <alan@nonono_irsi.com> wrote in message
news:080620031941125058%alan@nonono_irsi.com...

> , and I want the things designed to deliver air to deliver it no
> ?matter what my depth.

>
> That's stretching it a bit.

OK. You take a snorkle to any depth you want, and tell me how well it
delivers air.

That's not stretching it, it's physics.

--
Submergo ergo sum


Alan Street

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Jun 9, 2003, 1:16:30 AM6/9/03
to
In article <qzUEa.887050$OV.830701@rwcrnsc54>, Jerome O'Neil
<jerome...@yahoo.com> wrote:

€"Alan Street" <alan@nonono_irsi.com> wrote in message


It's physics that it doesn't deliver air anywhere but at the surface.
It's stupidity (capitol offense stupidity) that one would try to
breathe off a snorkle underwater.

Curtis

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Jun 9, 2003, 1:50:38 AM6/9/03
to
"suds"wrote

> > > What makes a snorkel dangerous?
> >
> > It's the one piece of dive equipment considered cheap enough and
> > disposable enough to use for flogging dumbasses with, even if not quite
as
> > effective as the lean hex rod. :-)
> >
>
> I dive knife is far more effective when it comes to attitude correction.

All depends on who's using it. Leaves less evidence, hurts a heck of a
lot more. ;-)

Curtis

Lee Bell

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Jun 9, 2003, 6:48:04 AM6/9/03
to
"Jerome O'Neil" entertained us with:

> :Entanglement hazard, increased risk of mask flooding when yer in a high
> :current environment (that "streamlined" thing), often confused with power
> :inflator, and I want the things designed to deliver air to deliver it no
> :matter what my depth.

All personal chioce issues, but I think it's worthwhile pointing out that a
very large number of divers, did a very large number of dives, over a very
large number of years, with snorkels attached to their masks. Almost all of
those dives were done without getting entangled, without flooding masks and
without confusing the snorkel with a power inflator (?). Neither masks nor
snorkels have changed all that much. Perhaps divers have. Perhaps it's not
a change for the better.

Dan Bracuk wrote:
> Increase mask flooding, I have experinced myself. Not to sure about this
> entanglement thing though, in what does a snorkel get entangled?

Kelp (I assume), fishing line and nets attached to wrecks, pretty much
anything that can entagle objects that stick out, can entangle a snorkel.

Lee


James Goddard

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Jun 9, 2003, 8:37:01 AM6/9/03
to
Anyone with an IQ of at least 5 points above Jammer 6's.

"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> wrote in message
news:ve4glq2...@corp.supernews.com...

James Goddard

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 8:38:42 AM6/9/03
to
"John Francis" <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> wrote in message
news:v825evgid7nug2vt4...@4ax.com...

> On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 19:51:46 -0400, Dan Bracuk <NOTb...@pathcom.com>
> wrote:
>
> >"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> entertained us with:
> >:excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
> >
> >Someone who understands DIR, and rejects it.
> >
> Someone who doesn't understand DIR, and rejects it. 8)

Someone who "does it right" but is not necessarily DIR.


Alan Street

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Jun 9, 2003, 9:42:01 AM6/9/03
to
In article <Nb%Ea.9942$Zo.1...@dfw-read.news.verio.net>, James
Goddard <ne...@earthwarelimited.com> wrote:

€"John Francis" <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> wrote in message


Actually, that's exactly backwards.

Joe English

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Jun 9, 2003, 9:52:32 AM6/9/03
to

Tim Smoot wrote:

I always carry a snorkel, but then most of my diving is drift, in small boats.

The first thing they take is your weights, then bcd, that leaves you
with the mask, snorkel, and fins. I like having the snorkel. Never
found it to be a problem. But I can understand the people that find
them a nuisance. I just never have.

James Goddard

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 10:22:30 AM6/9/03
to
"Alan Street" <alan@nonono_irsi.com> wrote in message
news:090620030639328021%alan@nonono_irsi.com...

> In article <Nb%Ea.9942$Zo.1...@dfw-read.news.verio.net>, James
> Goddard <ne...@earthwarelimited.com> wrote:
>
> ?"John Francis" <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> wrote in message
> ?news:v825evgid7nug2vt4...@4ax.com...
> ?> On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 19:51:46 -0400, Dan Bracuk <NOTb...@pathcom.com>
> ?> wrote:
> ?>
> ?> >"josh" <josh....@no.spam.mail.charter.net> entertained us with:
> ?> >:excuse my ignorance, but what is a stroke
> ?> >
> ?> >Someone who understands DIR, and rejects it.
> ?> >
> ?> Someone who doesn't understand DIR, and rejects it. 8)
> ?
> ?Someone who "does it right" but is not necessarily DIR.
> ?
> ?

>
> Actually, that's exactly backwards.

For stroke, but not for Stroke.

Alan Street

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Jun 9, 2003, 11:06:59 AM6/9/03
to
In article <5J0Fa.9945$Zo.1...@dfw-read.news.verio.net>, James
Goddard <ne...@earthwarelimited.com> wrote:


€> ?
€> ?Someone who "does it right" but is not necessarily DIR.


€> ?
€> ?
€>
€> Actually, that's exactly backwards.

€For stroke, but not for Stroke.



I always get those two mixed up :-).

AirHog

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 1:26:34 PM6/9/03
to
> For stroke, but not for Stroke.

To stroke or not to stroke...that is the question..
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to breathe the long hose
The doubles and stages of outrageous weight,
Or to take snorkles against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them. To dive: to descend;
No more; and by a dive to say we shall decompress
The narcosis and the thousands of dollars spent shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To dive, to decompress
To decompress: perchance to recover: ay, there's the rub;
For in that safety stop of off gassing what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this drysuit,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of DCS;
For who would bear the SPG'S and bottom timers of time,
The WKKPP's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of dispriz'd called dives, darwins delay,


Heh with apologies to William....

Greg Mossman

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Jun 9, 2003, 1:58:33 PM6/9/03
to
"Lee Bell" <lee...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:bc1o9d$jmp$1...@slb9.atl.mindspring.net...

> Kelp (I assume), fishing line and nets attached to wrecks, pretty much
> anything that can entagle objects that stick out, can entangle a snorkel.

Kelp is very visible, so it's no problem to keep it from entangling around
your snorkel. You simply push it aside like you would part those bead
curtains popular in the 70's. Where it nails you is the tank valve/first
stage and the fin straps (the latter, I suppose, could be solved by using
spring straps).


Charlie Hammond

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Jun 9, 2003, 2:36:32 PM6/9/03
to
In article <ve46oce...@corp.supernews.com>,
"Steg" <av...@nuvox.net> writes:

>I'd like to know how many of you carry a snorkel on your mask while diving.
>The only reason I can think of to carry one is in case you end up stuck on

>the surface with no air left in the tank and the boat is far away. ...

I don't wear a snorkel. Because it is a PITA.

If you are out-of-air and have a long surface swim or wait for the boat
you can still manually inflate your BC. Of course a BC is not a PFD,
but it provides good floatation. If the water is so rough that you
can't keep your face in the air, I doubt that you can keep your sorkel
clear any better. If things are bad enough, you can drop your weight,
take of your BC or backplate, drop your empty tank and regs, and use
the BC/wing as a floatation device. (Hint: I've never seen a snorkel
provided along with a lifejacket. Not on any boat or aircraft I've
been on.)

Somebody mentioned a surface crawl over kelp. O.K., that is something
I've never done, but it does sound like a reasonable justification for
a snorkel. I would really like to dive in the kelp forests someday.
I'll keep this in mind.

Snorkels do create an added entanglement hazzard. Unless you are running
lines in some sort of cave/wreck environment, this is probably not too
much of an issue. I have seen divers catch a snorkel on a tag line trailing
behind a dive boat, but I've never seen this be more than a minor nuisance.

--
Charlie Hammond -- Hewlett-Packard Company -- Ft Lauderdale FL USA
(hammond@not@peek.ssr.hp.com -- remove "@not" when replying)
All opinions expressed are my own and not necessarily my employer's.

Jammer Six

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Jun 9, 2003, 2:40:33 PM6/9/03
to
In article <Qs4Fa.2204$NF7....@news.cpqcorp.net>, Charlie Hammond
<hammond@not@peek.ssr.hp.com> wrote:

€ Somebody mentioned a surface crawl over kelp. O.K., that is something


€ I've never done, but it does sound like a reasonable justification for
€ a snorkel. I would really like to dive in the kelp forests someday.
€ I'll keep this in mind.

It's not.

--
"We're going to rush the hijackers."
-Jeremy Glick, aboard United Airlines flight 93, September 11, 2001

Popeye

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Jun 9, 2003, 6:56:52 PM6/9/03
to
>From: mickey...@hwr.com (AirHog)
>Date: 6/9/03 1:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time
>Message-id: <74f27663.03060...@posting.google.com>

Bravo!


Popeye
"I mean to kill you in one minute, Ned, or see you hanged,
at Fort Smith, at Judge Parker's convenience. Which'll it be?"

Drew A. Dunn

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Jun 9, 2003, 7:21:23 PM6/9/03
to

That's good... damn good!

John Francis

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Jun 9, 2003, 9:34:39 PM6/9/03
to

Crap. I suppose you now expect an honest to goodness Willy Shakespeare
teeshirt or hat that says something insulting like "First we kill the
lawyers" or how about one with "The Taming of the Shrew" in bold
letters across the chest?

JF

http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

Pumpkin

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Jun 9, 2003, 10:02:28 PM6/9/03
to
>Crap. I suppose you now expect an honest to goodness Willy Shakespeare
> teeshirt or hat that says something insulting like "First we kill the
> lawyers" or how about one with "The Taming of the Shrew" in bold
> letters across the chest?

Actually, my favorite line of the Bard's has always been the refrence to
Claudius by Hamlet in act I, scene 5....

"O villain, villain,
smiling damnčd villain!"

AirHog
--
>Kimber: I love you, Pumpkin.
> Airhog: I love you, Honey Bunny.
> Airhog: All right, everybody be cool this is a robbery!
> Kimber: Any of you fucking pricks move, and I'll execute every
> motherfucking last one of you!


John Francis

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 10:44:50 PM6/9/03
to
On Mon, 09 Jun 2003 22:02:28 -0400, Pumpkin <mic...@tekdiveguy.com>
wrote:

>>Crap. I suppose you now expect an honest to goodness Willy Shakespeare
>> teeshirt or hat that says something insulting like "First we kill the
>> lawyers" or how about one with "The Taming of the Shrew" in bold
>> letters across the chest?
>
>Actually, my favorite line of the Bard's has always been the refrence to
>Claudius by Hamlet in act I, scene 5....
>
> "O villain, villain,
> smiling damnčd villain!"
>

I don't think that made it to teeshirt fame.

JF


http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

Dan Bracuk

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 11:03:17 PM6/9/03
to
John Francis <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> entertained us with:
:Crap. I suppose you now expect an honest to goodness Willy Shakespeare

:teeshirt or hat that says something insulting like "First we kill the
:lawyers" or how about one with "The Taming of the Shrew" in bold
:letters across the chest?

Too bad they don't sell those where you live. Oh, wait a minute, they do.

Dan Bracuk
Never use a big word when a diminutive one will do.
The Best of Rec.Scuba
http://www.pathcom.com/~bracuk/RecScuba/


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Dan Bracuk

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Jun 9, 2003, 11:21:32 PM6/9/03
to
AirHog wrote
: To stroke or not to stroke...that is the question..

Not bad. Almost good enuf for The Best of Rec.Scuba.

John Francis

unread,
Jun 9, 2003, 11:14:27 PM6/9/03
to
On Mon, 09 Jun 2003 23:03:17 -0400, Dan Bracuk <NOTb...@pathcom.com>
wrote:

>John Francis <johnf...@sympatico.ca.remove> entertained us with:


>:Crap. I suppose you now expect an honest to goodness Willy Shakespeare
>:teeshirt or hat that says something insulting like "First we kill the
>:lawyers" or how about one with "The Taming of the Shrew" in bold
>:letters across the chest?
>
>Too bad they don't sell those where you live. Oh, wait a minute, they do.
>

In fact, I have several sitting here as we speak.

JF


http://www3.sympatico.ca/johnfrancis/scubachat.htm

Genisys Davicom Inc.

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Jun 10, 2003, 2:40:48 AM6/10/03
to

"AirHog" <mickey...@hwr.com> wrote in message
news:74f27663.03060...@posting.google.com...

> Heh with apologies to William....

BACON !

DAMN IT !

BACON!

Sheesh.

David
Edmonton, Alberta


Lee Bell

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Jun 10, 2003, 7:59:30 AM6/10/03
to
You need to apologize to noone for this one. Outstanding.

Lee

"AirHog" <mickey...@hwr.com> wrote in message
news:74f27663.03060...@posting.google.com...

Lee Bell

unread,
Jun 10, 2003, 8:02:13 AM6/10/03
to
Greg Mossman wrote


> > Kelp (I assume), fishing line and nets attached to wrecks, pretty much
> > anything that can entagle objects that stick out, can entangle a
snorkel.
>
> Kelp is very visible, so it's no problem to keep it from entangling around
> your snorkel. You simply push it aside like you would part those bead
> curtains popular in the 70's. Where it nails you is the tank valve/first
> stage and the fin straps (the latter, I suppose, could be solved by using
> spring straps).

If you say so. Since a snorkel attached to a mask is in the same general
area as the tank valve, I figured that it too would be an entanglement
hazard, or at least a mask seal breaking risk, but logic does not always
yield a correct answer.

Lee


Jack Farmer

unread,
Jun 17, 2003, 3:37:39 AM6/17/03
to
Someone with an UN-SAFE diving attitude and OR gear configuration.

Greg Mossman

unread,
Jun 17, 2003, 5:04:41 AM6/17/03