IAAPA etiquette again

8 views
Skip to first unread message

Matthew Crowther

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 3:55:26 PM11/12/03
to
Time for the standard post regarding enthusiasts/ACEers that plan to
attend IAAPA.....I think that this has even more relevance this year,
considering the shaky ground that enthusiasts are on right now because
of what happened at Holiday World.

The IAAPA is an Industry trade show, not an enthusiasts event. If you
plan to attend, and are not conducting official business, then just
follow these simple guidelines:

1. Dress nicely- not necessarily a suit and tie, but no ratty t-shirts
and blue jeans.

2. Respect the companies doing business at their booths, do not butt in
when they are talking to clients. Do not pester the folks with too many
questions.

That is it....pretty simple. Please show a good face for the enthusiasts
community, this year especially.

PS- ACERS- please do not hang out directly in front of the ACE booth- we
are there to conduct business as well.

Thanks for your attention-

Matt

Waiting for the Rastus flame, which I shall ignore, along with any other
trolls.

BloodEsteem

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 4:15:28 PM11/12/03
to
>Waiting for the Rastus flame, which I shall ignore, along with any other
>trolls.

Now, I agree with the fact that random trolls and flames are just plain stupid,
but was this truly needed at the end of your post? If I was Rastus I would
infact do something (maybe not a flame, who knows) to let you know that I wasnt
happy with that. Does it seem at all like some here at RRC are out to get a
rise out of those people we dont like. (i.e. alvey, elissa, any random troll,
etc.)

I do not wish to start a fight, thats the last thing I want. I love RRC and I
know it has gone down hill from "the good 'ol days" I read about from people
like Coasterjulie and Mark Mckenzie, I just dont want to see it go anymore
downhill with the new trolls and flames floating around, so lets just ignore em
eh?

Clay "I am actually happy Matt posted these simple rules" Lamanske

Dave Althoff Jr

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 4:48:10 PM11/12/03
to
BloodEsteem (blood...@aol.com) wrote:
: >Waiting for the Rastus flame, which I shall ignore, along with any other
: >trolls.

Clay, it's not that simple.

The Rastus Flame that Matt is expecting isn't expected to come from
Rastus, for instance, but rather from one of a handfull of people expected
to gripe about what Rastus did five years ago. The dynamic is actually
quite complicated, and Matt has been doing this long enough that he's
pretty much figured out how it works. 8-)

Let me use this opportunity to also point out that Matt has been attending
IAAPA long enough that his advice in this regard is pretty good.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
--
/-\ _ *** Respect rides. They do not respect you. ***
/XXX\ /X\ /X\_ _ /X\__ _ _ _____
/XXXXX\ /XXX\ _/XXXX\_ /X\ /XXXXX\ /X\ /X\ /XXXXX
_/XXXXXXX\__/XXXXX\/XXXXXXXX\_/XXX\_/XXXXXXX\__/XXX\_/XXX\_/\_/XXXXXX

Charles Nungester

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 5:29:37 PM11/12/03
to
Get ready for the Rastus attacks


Charles Nungester
Coasters ridden standing up=3 Mantis, King Cobra and Chang
Coasters riddin sitting down= 213

BloodEsteem

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 6:16:12 PM11/12/03
to
>The Rastus Flame that Matt is expecting isn't expected to come from
>Rastus, for instance, but rather from one of a handfull of people expected
>to gripe about what Rastus did five years ago. The dynamic is actually
>quite complicated, and Matt has been doing this long enough that he's

Oh....well that I did not know...
Well O.K, I apologize for my statement then.

Clay "wish I knew these things in advance" Lamanske

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 8:39:17 PM11/12/03
to
On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 20:55:26 GMT, Matthew Crowther
<mcro...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>Time for the standard post regarding enthusiasts/ACEers that plan to
>attend IAAPA.....I think that this has even more relevance this year,
>considering the shaky ground that enthusiasts are on right now because
>of what happened at Holiday World.

I know, heck I heard somebody died there during normal park hours.
Those damned enthusiasts!

>
>The IAAPA is an Industry trade show, not an enthusiasts event. If you
>plan to attend, and are not conducting official business, then just
>follow these simple guidelines:
>
>1. Dress nicely- not necessarily a suit and tie, but no ratty t-shirts
>and blue jeans.

Doesn't Stan Checketts wear blue jeans there? So, you like to judge
people on their appearance, Matt?

>PS- ACERS- please do not hang out directly in front of the ACE booth- we
>are there to conduct business as well.

Yeah, I'm sure there's plenty of business to be done, what with the
normal millions that ACE brings in every year from IAAPA sales.
That's why thousands of dollars of ACE funds are spent on paying folks
to go there, when probably 50 pay to go on their own and deliver the
news to be had there months before ACE does it? I'm pretty sure NAPHA
doesn't pay for members to go, and DAFE sure doesn't.

>
>Thanks for your attention-
>
>Matt
>
>Waiting for the Rastus flame, which I shall ignore, along with any other
>trolls.

Like me asking if your wife, who has gotten in IAAPA for free in the
past, is getting in free this year, and only staying two days?


Rastus O'Ginga

Winner of the 2nd Annual C. Montgomery Burns Award for
Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Excellence.

"What an awful dream, 1s and 0s everywhere... I thought I saw a 2." - Bender

ANTI-BED-WETTING-LIBELRAL DISCLAIMER:
The content of this post, and all previous posts made by this user, is 100%
opinion. Any similarity between this post and the truth is purely
coincidental. Anyone who reads this post and draws conclusions about it is
doing so by their choice. How they use those conclusions to direct their
own lives and opinions from that point forward is absolutely a result of
their own cognitive abilities and is in no way related or legally binded to
this poster. NO individual, business entity, or legal authority should use
the content of this post, or any other post by the originator, in whole, or
in part, to assist in making a decision that could affect the lives of any
of the inhabitants of planet Earth, since the content may not be true.


NoGodForMe

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 9:42:47 PM11/12/03
to
Great post, you gotta admit it was entertaining.

What makes me laugh about all this, is that so far there's a whopping
12 people going from RRC in the roll call thread. WOW, a big 12
people. Now don't stampede the place at once. Speaking of Stampede,
Dolly Parton's Dixie Stampede is worth going too. They give you a
small roasted chicken you eat with your fingers and it tastes great.
Go since you people have so much ACE money to blow. It's on I-4
before I-192, make reservations in advance because it's usually full.
Back to what I was saying. Even if all 12 people showed up at the
same time with their wives and kids, I doubt it would make a big
impact.

And I also don't understand why ACE needs a booth there if the
attendees are manufacturers who are probably already in ACE. I
mean, I've never seen an ACE booth at an amusement park, when they're
not doing an event, so why are they at IAAPA? You'd think if they
really wanted new members, the ACE booth would be at City Walk, or in
front of CP, or in front of other parks, but no.
Oh, I'm sure I'll get the, "We're gathering information" which we'll
never pass on to anyone but ourselves line.

I hope the 12 people that show up with their wives and kids DO stand
in front of the ACE booth and make a scene. It would probably be the
most exciting thing of the show. Don't block them off now, there's
alot of people that must get to that ACE booth.

Wonder how many people will get smushed by rides that fall down this
year?

And you people thinking of going want to go on the rides. Yeah
right, Good Luck, and may the smush be with you.

Larry Johnson

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 10:17:06 PM11/12/03
to
You didn't have to add that last line, really. Mister Mullet would have
surely responded without it!

Josh Wozny

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 11:16:37 PM11/12/03
to
Who said I'm going with ACE? Not that I should be responding to this - but who
the hell are you to tell me how I'm going to act or how much money I have to
spend?

Maybe it's those of us who do some shit with our lives instead of trolling
around RRC who can actually afford to go somewhere.

"when everyone else in the world follows your lead (although a cold day in hell
it will surely be) that's when the entire world shall live in harmony."-Bad
Religion

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 12, 2003, 11:41:43 PM11/12/03
to
On 13 Nov 2003 04:16:37 GMT, mx...@aol.commode (Josh Wozny) wrote:

>Who said I'm going with ACE? Not that I should be responding to this - but who
>the hell are you to tell me how I'm going to act or how much money I have to
>spend?
>
>Maybe it's those of us who do some shit with our lives instead of trolling
>around RRC who can actually afford to go somewhere.


Great response!!

Just remember, dress up to look good for ACE, but don't even THINK
about dropping by the ACE display, they don't have time for lowly
members.

However, don't think all of the EC is this pompous. I'm having lunch
with Carole and will probably be wearing jeans and/or shorts.
Hopefully this will keep Matt the hell away from me.

My question is always this: Why should I dress up to go somewhere to
run around in a laser tag arena, eat ice cream and pizza, look at cool
robotics, and ride rides? I ain't buying anything, why should I dress
up like I am? That will simply make the salesmen think I'm more
important that I am. I make no bones about it when I'm there. I'm
there for fun and for observation. Plus, I'll try out about anything
I'm offered food/drink/games/rides/hot mermaid babes/pinball/whatever.

And frankly, my review of the show will be seen FASTER than anything
ACE does, and I will talk about lots of non-coaster stuff. If
anything, I will do more for the show businesses on average than ACE
will.

People who are overly concerned with appearances are pretty much
guaranteed to be phony bastards in my 34 years of life experience.

Worlds Apart...

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 12:15:19 AM11/13/03
to

I remember reading this last year and yes it's just as relevant this
year and all successive years. It's a 'business convention' and not a
'party, ERT, comic horror or fetish convention'.
It's not even E3 with it's casual (not really business-like) atmosphere.
I have used the above 'business convention ettiquette' many times over
the years (and without being told or reminded as i represented the
company I was presently working for). 10 years in a row at the
Gutennburg Festival printing industry conventions also.

It all comes down to sense and maturity.. and yes sometimes
people/adults need to be told or reminded.

The post was cool IMO...

Daniel W. Rouse Jr.

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 2:30:27 AM11/13/03
to
"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message
news:gsn5rv8p22lqcu4c0...@4ax.com...

> On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 20:55:26 GMT, Matthew Crowther
> <mcro...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
> >Time for the standard post regarding enthusiasts/ACEers that plan to
> >attend IAAPA.....I think that this has even more relevance this year,
> >considering the shaky ground that enthusiasts are on right now because
> >of what happened at Holiday World.
>
> I know, heck I heard somebody died there during normal park hours.
> Those damned enthusiasts!
>
Wow! That comment really shows little to no class, sorry, it has to be said.
Yeah, I know this is an unmoderated Usenet newsgroup, but still...

I think the details of the incident are well understood already, and it's
rather rude and cold to practically mock Holiday World over their justified
and understandable reactions to that incident--even if you disagree with
them.

> >
> >The IAAPA is an Industry trade show, not an enthusiasts event. If you
> >plan to attend, and are not conducting official business, then just
> >follow these simple guidelines:
> >
> >1. Dress nicely- not necessarily a suit and tie, but no ratty t-shirts
> >and blue jeans.
>
> Doesn't Stan Checketts wear blue jeans there? So, you like to judge
> people on their appearance, Matt?
>

Yes, and I do believe Stan wore blue jeans when he spoke at Solace 2002,
although I think he wore a button and collar shirt rather than a T-shirt
(check this--someone has to have pictures of his speech somewhere). As a
presenter, that is his right, especially if that is his business attire and
he is accepted in that attire. If the event coordinators have an issue with
the presenter's attire, probably they can let them know by phone, written
letter, or e-mail.

But as a guest at a convention, it's often better to err on the side of
dressing more formally as opposed to more casually--for example, a button-up
collar shirt instead of a T-shirt, maybe dockers instead of jeans, maybe
leather walking shoes or even loafers that look like they are in good repair
(and even recently polished) instead of tennis shoes or sandals.

Or, maybe even shirt/pants/tie/dress shoes if the event calls for it. And
then the presenters would probably also be wearing a suit jackets.

> >PS- ACERS- please do not hang out directly in front of the ACE booth- we
> >are there to conduct business as well.
>

My response to this quoted comment: This seems to be worded rather rudely.
It is fairly obvious that an ACE member who is already part of the club
should not just try and hang out with the ACE presenters in the ACE exhibit.
That said, it could have been worded in a more businesslike manner: for
example...

PS--Since the ACE is conducting business at IAAPA, current ACE members
should limit the amount of time they spend around the ACE booth.

> Yeah, I'm sure there's plenty of business to be done, what with the
> normal millions that ACE brings in every year from IAAPA sales.
> That's why thousands of dollars of ACE funds are spent on paying folks
> to go there, when probably 50 pay to go on their own and deliver the
> news to be had there months before ACE does it? I'm pretty sure NAPHA
> doesn't pay for members to go, and DAFE sure doesn't.
>

My response to your comment: I would expect that an ACE presence at IAAPA
would be for those who have an interest in what the club is about, so they
could obtain information to join the club in the future, or maybe even join
the club at IAAPA. I would imagine the attendees would have their flight,
hotel, exhibit fee, and maybe even a modest per-diem for meals covered as
reasonable compensation for them attending an event that is probably in a
different state from the one they reside in.

The museum effort would probably also be a visible aspect at the ACE
exhibit--although that is just my guess.

Note that I am not going to IAAPA, but I have attended a couple of local
computer conventions in the past years. Those who wore
T-shirt/shorts/flip-flops, and other laid-back attire looked rather out of
place at a computer event held in a convention center... even in the
shopping areas.

Just my opinion on this matter, of course.

[snip... uncalled for comment not related to IAAPA and retaliatory response
for that uncalled for comment.]

edandkasey

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 3:58:37 AM11/13/03
to
Jason,

I wear nice jeans too. While I am there for business, I am not going to be
uncomfortable either. I've seen the full gambit of clothes and some fairly
wild outfits over the years, I've been attending for 10 years now, hard to
believe. (my first show was in Miami, ugh what a bad show.)

Go enjoy the show it's worth it just for all the free wack-a-mole!!!

Also, if you've got the time and want to be away from the hub-bub of I drive
stay at Windsor Palms
http://www.villadirect.com Worth the drive. save some money and stay in a
darn nice property too.

Ed Roberts
Here we come Orlando

"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message
news:gsn5rv8p22lqcu4c0...@4ax.com...

Flare

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 6:10:32 AM11/13/03
to

You can call me like a troll, •Matt•, but you're coming off like
somewhat of an asshole, in my humble opinoin.

Even if I had time, and wanted to go to this trade show, I certainly
don't need a 2nd set of parents. You're speaking to ACERs, at large,
like they're children.

Maybe they are... But please explain to me how a club member,
nonchalantly "Hanging out" ANYHWHERE is going to disrupt you, or anyone
else at the show, from doing "Business"... What, are you going to
actually save a coaster? You sound as if your ashamed of your club.

Is that trollish of me to post my reaction?

Dave

Flare

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 6:16:29 AM11/13/03
to

Dave Althoff Jr wrote:

> Let me use this opportunity to also point out that Matt has been attending
> IAAPA long enough that his advice in this regard is pretty good.

I can respect this, Dave, but answer me a simple question. Is the common
denominator of the ACE membership so ungentrified that they need to be
dressed and programmed for a simple trade show?

How is this show different than any normal trade show??? Are coaster
geeks that socially awry in the scary, sickening ways Matt's hinting to
in his parental "Reminder"?

Dave


William J. Buckley

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 7:09:45 AM11/13/03
to

"Flare" <fl...@gis.net> wrote in message
news:hKJsb.36692$E9.1...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...

> How is this show different than any normal trade show??? Are coaster
> geeks that socially awry in the scary, sickening ways Matt's hinting to
> in his parental "Reminder"?
>
> Dave

The sad answer? YES!!!


Dave Althoff Jr

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 9:42:11 AM11/13/03
to
Flare (fl...@gis.net) wrote:

: Dave Althoff Jr wrote:

: > Let me use this opportunity to also point out that Matt has been attending
: > IAAPA long enough that his advice in this regard is pretty good.

: I can respect this, Dave, but answer me a simple question. Is the common
: denominator of the ACE membership so ungentrified that they need to be
: dressed and programmed for a simple trade show?

I like to think not. The times I have gone to IAAPA, it hasn't been a
problem at least not among the park nuts I observed at the show. I
understand it has been a problem in the past with certain people who never
quite figured out that they were operating in someone else's world for a
few days, but, outsider that I am, I don't know specifics.

: How is this show different than any normal trade show??? Are coaster

: geeks that socially awry in the scary, sickening ways Matt's hinting to
: in his parental "Reminder"?

It's not different from any normal trade show, really. But I think Matt's
reminder isn't necessarily a bad thing, simply because...and I know, for
people like you and me, this is hard to relate to...for a lot of coaster
nuts, IAAPA is the first trade show *of any kind* they've ever attended.

I do think that Matt tends to put too much of an emphasis on appearance
and perhaps not enough on behavior, but again, think about the
first-timer...overdressing for the show will not be embarassing to anyone.
Once you've spent a day on the show floor, you get a pretty good idea of
what's "normal".

My advice? Come on, don't take it so personally!!

Mamoosh

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 9:53:10 AM11/13/03
to
"Flare" <fl...@gis.net> wrote in message
news:IEJsb.36689$E9.3...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...

> But please explain to me how a club member,

> nonchalantly "Hanging out" ANYWHERE is


> going to disrupt you, or anyone else at the show,
> from doing "Business"... What, are you going to
> actually save a coaster? You sound as if your
> ashamed of your club.

Perhaps ACE wants to Pontin-trate on business?

mOOSH--who would welcome people to hang out at the S&D booth....if we
had one ;-)
--
Holiday and all-occasion cards, plus our 2004 Wood Coaster
Calendar...still available at http://www.negative-g.com/SDGreetings/


Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 10:29:43 AM11/13/03
to
"Daniel W. Rouse Jr." <dwro...@nethere.comNOSPAM> wrote in message news:<10687087...@news-1.nethere.net>...

> "Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message
> news:gsn5rv8p22lqcu4c0...@4ax.com...
> > On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 20:55:26 GMT, Matthew Crowther
> > <mcro...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> >
> > >Time for the standard post regarding enthusiasts/ACEers that plan to
> > >attend IAAPA.....I think that this has even more relevance this year,
> > >considering the shaky ground that enthusiasts are on right now because
> > >of what happened at Holiday World.
> >
> > I know, heck I heard somebody died there during normal park hours.
> > Those damned enthusiasts!
> >
> Wow! That comment really shows little to no class, sorry, it has to be said.
> Yeah, I know this is an unmoderated Usenet newsgroup, but still...
>
> I think the details of the incident are well understood already, and it's
> rather rude and cold to practically mock Holiday World over their justified
> and understandable reactions to that incident--even if you disagree with
> them.

It's not mocking HW at all. It's responding to Matt's horseshit
bringing up something like that to justify him being some pompous
asshole "voice of ACE". HE'S the one that brought up the issue.

>
> > >
> > >The IAAPA is an Industry trade show, not an enthusiasts event. If you
> > >plan to attend, and are not conducting official business, then just
> > >follow these simple guidelines:
> > >
> > >1. Dress nicely- not necessarily a suit and tie, but no ratty t-shirts
> > >and blue jeans.
> >
> > Doesn't Stan Checketts wear blue jeans there? So, you like to judge
> > people on their appearance, Matt?
> >
> Yes, and I do believe Stan wore blue jeans when he spoke at Solace 2002,
> although I think he wore a button and collar shirt rather than a T-shirt
> (check this--someone has to have pictures of his speech somewhere). As a
> presenter, that is his right, especially if that is his business attire and
> he is accepted in that attire. If the event coordinators have an issue with
> the presenter's attire, probably they can let them know by phone, written
> letter, or e-mail.
>
> But as a guest at a convention, it's often better to err on the side of
> dressing more formally as opposed to more casually--for example, a button-up
> collar shirt instead of a T-shirt, maybe dockers instead of jeans, maybe
> leather walking shoes or even loafers that look like they are in good repair
> (and even recently polished) instead of tennis shoes or sandals.

WHy? I'm paying my own way to get in. There are no official dress
codes. I mean, fuckin'-A, at the last IAAPA I went to there was a
chick in a mermaid outfit, two bikini babes underwater, and a robot
chick in a tight outfit flirting with attendees. I'm supposed to
dress up for this?

It never ceases to amaze me how there are always people in this world
that think it is their job to tell someone what to do. At work, yep,
I have to listen to others. On vacation I wear whatever the hell I
want to wear, and Matt can bite me if he doesn't like it. Plain and
simple.

>
> Or, maybe even shirt/pants/tie/dress shoes if the event calls for it. And
> then the presenters would probably also be wearing a suit jackets.
>
> > >PS- ACERS- please do not hang out directly in front of the ACE booth- we
> > >are there to conduct business as well.
> >
> My response to this quoted comment: This seems to be worded rather rudely.
> It is fairly obvious that an ACE member who is already part of the club
> should not just try and hang out with the ACE presenters in the ACE exhibit.
> That said, it could have been worded in a more businesslike manner: for
> example...

Yes, it should have, but it is par from the course from some EC
members. I know Robb and Elissa were flat out told to leave the ACE
booth last year. And remember, Elissa used to write for
Rollercoaster! quite often.


> My response to your comment: I would expect that an ACE presence at IAAPA
> would be for those who have an interest in what the club is about, so they
> could obtain information to join the club in the future, or maybe even join
> the club at IAAPA. I would imagine the attendees would have their flight,
> hotel, exhibit fee, and maybe even a modest per-diem for meals covered as
> reasonable compensation for them attending an event that is probably in a
> different state from the one they reside in.

Why? Plenty of ACErs pay their way to IAAPA and could easily do the
vast majority of ACE "business". There are quite afew ACErs that get
paid to go, six I believe. Since only two man the booth usually, that
mean of the 4 days, you have to spend about a day and a half manning
the booth to get an all expenses paid vacation on club dues. That's
bullshit, period!


>
> The museum effort would probably also be a visible aspect at the ACE
> exhibit--although that is just my guess.

This is the only viable reason to have someone there. But, I must ask
you if you think it is reasonable to pay someone to go to Orlando to
ask for donations for a non-profit organization. Do you see any logic
in that?

>
> Note that I am not going to IAAPA, but I have attended a couple of local
> computer conventions in the past years. Those who wore
> T-shirt/shorts/flip-flops, and other laid-back attire looked rather out of
> place at a computer event held in a convention center... even in the
> shopping areas.

And you know what, I bet they didn't give a damn what you think.

Rastus O'Ginga

Mark Rosenzweig

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 10:42:18 AM11/13/03
to
Flare <fl...@gis.net> wrote in message news:<hKJsb.36692

>
> I can respect this, Dave, but answer me a simple question. Is the common
> denominator of the ACE membership so ungentrified that they need to be
> dressed and programmed for a simple trade show?

Dave, a percentage of enthusiasts (and the ones Matt is addressing
specifically without listing names) are the people who have Ralph
Wiggum personalities trapped inside the body of an "adult". These are
also the types of people who personally blame me for not enjoying
their ride on the Volare.

As an exhibitor at the show, I welcome visits from anyone. But when
someone drags themself into our booth smelling like a week old italian
sub and are under-dressed to the point of standing out, only to ask
questions over why this ride doesn't do this and that ride doesn't do
that, it doesn't exactly make my IAAPA experience an enchanting one.

IAAPA has gotten much more casual over the past few years. While
everyone in my crew still struts their stuff in fine Italian threads,
I don't think a nice pair of jeans and a casual button down shirt is
out of line.

Sometimes I think just getting up and matching a shirt (god forbid a
non coaster related shirt) with pants might be considered an
accomplishment for some.

Then you might run into further dilemmas like which coaster shirt to
wear with which pair of pants ("I can't possibly wear the shirt
depicting my number one wood with my third favorite pair of cargo
shorts").....gotta love the drama.

-Mark

Matthew Crowther

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 12:23:30 PM11/13/03
to
In article <qVMsb.11410$6c3....@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
"Mamoosh" <mam...@earthlink.net> wrote:

> "Flare" <fl...@gis.net> wrote in message
> news:IEJsb.36689$E9.3...@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
>
> > But please explain to me how a club member,
> > nonchalantly "Hanging out" ANYWHERE is
> > going to disrupt you, or anyone else at the show,
> > from doing "Business"... What, are you going to
> > actually save a coaster? You sound as if your
> > ashamed of your club.
>
> Perhaps ACE wants to Pontin-trate on business?
>

I meant hang out directly in front of the booth, blocking the ACE
officials from interacting with passers-by. If you wish to hang out in
the vicinity, like just barely off to the side, that is perfectly OK. It
is just that in the past, we have had groups of ACERS having long
conversations standing right smack in front of the booth. Sorry if I did
not make this more clear.

Matt

Daniel W. Rouse Jr.

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 12:26:32 PM11/13/03
to
"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodcable.net> wrote in message
news:5deb1669.03111...@posting.google.com...
Okay, maybe I misread this or something, but it did read very sarcastic.
While I may not currently visit Holiday World, I completely agree with
everything they have done so far after that tragedy.

But now I'm done with that comment, since IAAPA etiquette is the topic in
this discussion.

If they are presenting at IAAPA in casual or laid-back attire, and if many
others are dressed down to casual or laid-back, then no, I wouldn't expect
you and you alone to dress up.

However, if the majority of the others are at least dressed up in business
casual attire--dress up at least business casual, and let the mermaid,
bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the show.

But if there are in fact no official dress codes--if I did go to IAAPA, I'd
probably substitute a coaster T-shirt in place of a button up collar shirt,
but I'd still opt for wearing dockers, and walking shoes. For me, it's
casual enough to be comfortable, while being dressed up enough that if I
meet someone of importance, I am at least close to dressed up business
casual.

> It never ceases to amaze me how there are always people in this world
> that think it is their job to tell someone what to do. At work, yep,
> I have to listen to others. On vacation I wear whatever the hell I
> want to wear, and Matt can bite me if he doesn't like it. Plain and
> simple.
>

Ok, no you don't have to follow what Matt said. But in truth, these are
helpful guidelines, although worded rather rudely--almost like a lecture.
Part of that may be because he is posting to RRC during a time where it is
known for off-season trolling, and the other may be that he just decided to
post with an attitude for whatever reason he saw fit to do so.

I would also guess that if your attire was really that bad, I'm sure you
would just be outright asked to leave the convention by security.

> >
> > Or, maybe even shirt/pants/tie/dress shoes if the event calls for it.
And
> > then the presenters would probably also be wearing a suit jackets.
> >
> > > >PS- ACERS- please do not hang out directly in front of the ACE booth-
we
> > > >are there to conduct business as well.
> > >
> > My response to this quoted comment: This seems to be worded rather
rudely.
> > It is fairly obvious that an ACE member who is already part of the club
> > should not just try and hang out with the ACE presenters in the ACE
exhibit.
> > That said, it could have been worded in a more businesslike manner: for
> > example...
>
> Yes, it should have, but it is par from the course from some EC
> members. I know Robb and Elissa were flat out told to leave the ACE
> booth last year. And remember, Elissa used to write for
> Rollercoaster! quite often.

Well, unless they were goofing around and distracting the others from
conducting business, I would have expected that their presence at an ACE
booth would be actually be beneficial. Since they've also been visible on at
least a couple Discover Channel coaster shows, and someone could have at
least recognized their faces at least from TV.

But again, that is only my opinion.

> > My response to your comment: I would expect that an ACE presence at
IAAPA
> > would be for those who have an interest in what the club is about, so
they
> > could obtain information to join the club in the future, or maybe even
join
> > the club at IAAPA. I would imagine the attendees would have their
flight,
> > hotel, exhibit fee, and maybe even a modest per-diem for meals covered
as
> > reasonable compensation for them attending an event that is probably in
a
> > different state from the one they reside in.
>
> Why? Plenty of ACErs pay their way to IAAPA and could easily do the
> vast majority of ACE "business". There are quite afew ACErs that get
> paid to go, six I believe. Since only two man the booth usually, that
> mean of the 4 days, you have to spend about a day and a half manning
> the booth to get an all expenses paid vacation on club dues. That's
> bullshit, period!
>
>

The ACErs that pay their way to IAAPA more than likely do so because they
are attending the event for themselves, not actually conducting official
business on behalf on ACE. They need not select the most expensive hotels,
the most expensive first class airfare, they certainly shouldn't expect the
businesses attendees to pay the IAAPA exhibit booth fee, and I would expect
a modest per-diem--not $3.00 meals at Burger King (for example), but not
$50.00 meals at a fancy restaurant either.

If I wanted to go to IAAPA just to explore the trade show floor and ride the
rides--I better pay my own way.


> >
> > The museum effort would probably also be a visible aspect at the ACE
> > exhibit--although that is just my guess.
>
> This is the only viable reason to have someone there. But, I must ask
> you if you think it is reasonable to pay someone to go to Orlando to
> ask for donations for a non-profit organization. Do you see any logic
> in that?
>

Actually, I do. If they spend $6000, for example, to send six ACE members to
IAAPA--sure, they would need close to 120 new membership dues to replenish
those expenditures. However, it guarantees that ACE would have a presence,
vs. asking someone who maybe has limited funds to pay their own way to IAAPA
to represent ACE, only to have the arrangements get botched up, and that
person doesn't actually go to IAAPA.

> >
> > Note that I am not going to IAAPA, but I have attended a couple of local
> > computer conventions in the past years. Those who wore
> > T-shirt/shorts/flip-flops, and other laid-back attire looked rather out
of
> > place at a computer event held in a convention center... even in the
> > shopping areas.
>
> And you know what, I bet they didn't give a damn what you think.
>

Fair enough, it doesn't matter what I think. But when many of the presenters
and vendors there were at least dressed business casual, and many of the
attendees are at least dressed business casual, it just looks sort of odd
when someone is there dressed up for the beach.

Worlds Apart...

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 4:45:00 PM11/13/03
to

> However, if the majority of the others are at least dressed up in business
> casual attire--dress up at least business casual, and let the mermaid,
> bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the show.

Does anyone have any pics of or know any sites that did IAAPA reviews
with any pictures of these 'exceptions'?

Wolf

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 7:31:30 PM11/13/03
to
> > Waiting for the Rastus flame, which I shall ignore, along with any other
> > trolls.
>
> You can call me like a troll, •Matt•, but you're coming off like
> somewhat of an asshole, in my humble opinoin.
>
> Even if I had time, and wanted to go to this trade show, I certainly
> don't need a 2nd set of parents. You're speaking to ACERs, at large,
> like they're children.
>
> Maybe they are... But please explain to me how a club member,
> nonchalantly "Hanging out" ANYHWHERE is going to disrupt you, or anyone
> else at the show, from doing "Business"... What, are you going to
> actually save a coaster? You sound as if your ashamed of your club.

Wow.

Wow.

That was *classic*.


--
|\-/|
<0 0>
=(o)=
-Wolf


Wolf

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 7:41:52 PM11/13/03
to
> As an exhibitor at the show, I welcome visits from anyone. But when
> someone drags themself into our booth smelling like a week old italian
> sub and are under-dressed to the point of standing out, only to ask
> questions over why this ride doesn't do this and that ride doesn't do
> that, it doesn't exactly make my IAAPA experience an enchanting one.

Wouldn't smelling like an italian sub be apropo at Zamperla, which is, you
know, Italian?

;)

--
|\-/|
<0 0>
=(o)=

-Wolf ["ih-TAL-ee-an", not "EYE-tal-yon", thank you.]

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 7:45:39 PM11/13/03
to
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 09:26:32 -0800, "Daniel W. Rouse Jr."
<dwro...@nethere.comNOSPAM> wrote:


>
>However, if the majority of the others are at least dressed up in business
>casual attire--dress up at least business casual, and let the mermaid,
>bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the show.
>

Who are you to tell me how to dress?

>But if there are in fact no official dress codes--if I did go to IAAPA, I'd
>probably substitute a coaster T-shirt in place of a button up collar shirt,
>but I'd still opt for wearing dockers, and walking shoes. For me, it's
>casual enough to be comfortable, while being dressed up enough that if I
>meet someone of importance, I am at least close to dressed up business
>casual.

But, you know what, you WON'T meet someone important because YOU
aren't important. You should be going there in hopes of having a chat
with B and/or M. And even if they did, I doubt they'd care how you
were dressed, they aren't doing business with you. And even then, if
you're buying a $12MM coaster, you could show up in a speedo with a
gut hanging out and they'd gladly sell you the coaster, I'm sure.

>
>> It never ceases to amaze me how there are always people in this world
>> that think it is their job to tell someone what to do. At work, yep,
>> I have to listen to others. On vacation I wear whatever the hell I
>> want to wear, and Matt can bite me if he doesn't like it. Plain and
>> simple.
>>
>Ok, no you don't have to follow what Matt said. But in truth, these are
>helpful guidelines, although worded rather rudely--almost like a lecture.
>Part of that may be because he is posting to RRC during a time where it is
>known for off-season trolling, and the other may be that he just decided to
>post with an attitude for whatever reason he saw fit to do so.
>
>I would also guess that if your attire was really that bad, I'm sure you
>would just be outright asked to leave the convention by security.

Huh? You think IAAPA kicks folks out for wearing shorts and a
t-shirt? Have you ever been there? There are tons of folks,
including carnies. I'd bet there are people dressed down dropping
tens of thousands on plush or whatever.

>>
>The ACErs that pay their way to IAAPA more than likely do so because they
>are attending the event for themselves, not actually conducting official
>business on behalf on ACE. They need not select the most expensive hotels,
>the most expensive first class airfare, they certainly shouldn't expect the
>businesses attendees to pay the IAAPA exhibit booth fee, and I would expect
>a modest per-diem--not $3.00 meals at Burger King (for example), but not
>$50.00 meals at a fancy restaurant either.

>
>If I wanted to go to IAAPA just to explore the trade show floor and ride the
>rides--I better pay my own way.

Trust me, the "official" ACE delegates do all of that. They'll act
like martyrs, as usual, but it's all an act. Sure, they have an
obligation, but they are paid quite well for that obligation.

>Actually, I do. If they spend $6000, for example, to send six ACE members to
>IAAPA--sure, they would need close to 120 new membership dues to replenish
>those expenditures.

You are assuming 100% of membership dues are profit. I'd say more
like 10%, meaning they'd need 1200 folks, or a 15% increase in
membership, to simply break even.

>However, it guarantees that ACE would have a presence,
>vs. asking someone who maybe has limited funds to pay their own way to IAAPA
>to represent ACE, only to have the arrangements get botched up, and that
>person doesn't actually go to IAAPA.

ACE is a volunteer organization. Volunteer <> getting a free trip to
Orlando for 1 and a half days work.

Josh Wozny

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 8:15:41 PM11/13/03
to
>But as a guest at a convention, it's often better to err on the side of
>dressing more formally as opposed to more casually--for example, a button-up
>collar shirt instead of a T-shirt, maybe dockers instead of jeans, maybe
>leather walking shoes or even.....

Well, that's been my personal view....for myself. I've said that I would much
rather be over dressed than under dressed, but that goes for any occasion, and
once again, it's my personal preference. If someone wants to wear shorts and a
t-shirt because it's comfortable, I say go for it, people can make their own
decisions. Usually I hate dressing up, and for the show It's simply going to be
a matter of a pair of Khakis and a polo shirt, something I would wear to work
on a "more dressy than normal, but not dressed-up" kind of day. I'm also there
representing the press. For me, personally, the outfit goes along with the
press pass. I wouldn't feel right taking photographs and wearing a press badge
while in jeans and a t-shirt.
That still doesn't mean I think anyone else has to dress up.
Josh

EricB1980

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 8:16:43 PM11/13/03
to
Im a supposed "Carnie"

and im kind of offended by the casual dress is ok, EVEN CARNIES SHOW UP.


Loose the prejudice.

Ill be there witha suit and tie.

I go to look proffesional because I will meet many proffesionals and will
wanted to be treated as such.

Wolf

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 10:59:04 PM11/13/03
to
> >However, if the majority of the others are at least dressed up in
business
> >casual attire--dress up at least business casual, and let the mermaid,
> >bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the show.
> >
>
> Who are you to tell me how to dress?

Well I'm gonna tell you not to wear a bikini, anyway.

Daniel W. Rouse Jr.

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 11:27:21 PM11/13/03
to
"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message
news:4p88rvc73jjju2qve...@4ax.com...

> On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 09:26:32 -0800, "Daniel W. Rouse Jr."
> <dwro...@nethere.comNOSPAM> wrote:
>
>
> >
> >However, if the majority of the others are at least dressed up in
business
> >casual attire--dress up at least business casual, and let the mermaid,
> >bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the show.
> >
>
> Who are you to tell me how to dress?
>
The sentence was phrased in a journalistic manner--it should not have been
construed as a command specific to you. If it helps, change that sentence
to:

probably it's best to dress up at least business casual, and let the


mermaid, bikini babes, and robot chick stand out as the exceptions to the
show.

> >But if there are in fact no official dress codes--if I did go to IAAPA,


I'd
> >probably substitute a coaster T-shirt in place of a button up collar
shirt,
> >but I'd still opt for wearing dockers, and walking shoes. For me, it's
> >casual enough to be comfortable, while being dressed up enough that if I
> >meet someone of importance, I am at least close to dressed up business
> >casual.
>
> But, you know what, you WON'T meet someone important because YOU
> aren't important. You should be going there in hopes of having a chat
> with B and/or M. And even if they did, I doubt they'd care how you
> were dressed, they aren't doing business with you. And even then, if
> you're buying a $12MM coaster, you could show up in a speedo with a
> gut hanging out and they'd gladly sell you the coaster, I'm sure.
>

Um, ok. And just like there are unpredictable moments where Joe Average
might meet a celebrity, if there is an opportunity to meet someone important
in the amusement industry, you can be sure I'm not going to want to worry
about making a bad first impression starting with my attire.

And that doesn't mean full suit either, of course--unless the event requires
a full suit.

Let's just put it this way--I'd probably feel much more comfortable talking
to "Mr. B" or "Mr. M", if I at least had a button-up collar shirt, khaki's
and casual dress shoes with dress socks that complemented the pants and
shoes vs. if I was wearing a popular form of laid back casual attire
consisting of T-shirt, shorts, and closed shoes w/o socks.

But then again, that's me. Others, of course, may vary. And those who choose
to wear laid back attire might choose to judge *me* as overdressed, and
again, that's their judgement of my attire, which one way or another, they
are entitled to.

> >
> >> It never ceases to amaze me how there are always people in this world
> >> that think it is their job to tell someone what to do. At work, yep,
> >> I have to listen to others. On vacation I wear whatever the hell I
> >> want to wear, and Matt can bite me if he doesn't like it. Plain and
> >> simple.
> >>
> >Ok, no you don't have to follow what Matt said. But in truth, these are
> >helpful guidelines, although worded rather rudely--almost like a lecture.
> >Part of that may be because he is posting to RRC during a time where it
is
> >known for off-season trolling, and the other may be that he just decided
to
> >post with an attitude for whatever reason he saw fit to do so.
> >
> >I would also guess that if your attire was really that bad, I'm sure you
> >would just be outright asked to leave the convention by security.
>
> Huh? You think IAAPA kicks folks out for wearing shorts and a
> t-shirt? Have you ever been there? There are tons of folks,
> including carnies. I'd bet there are people dressed down dropping
> tens of thousands on plush or whatever.
>

You missed the point. My point was that even if someone else thought your
attire wasn't great, if event security didn't ask you to leave, then your
attire definitely wasn't inappropriate.

> >>
> >The ACErs that pay their way to IAAPA more than likely do so because they
> >are attending the event for themselves, not actually conducting official
> >business on behalf on ACE. They need not select the most expensive
hotels,
> >the most expensive first class airfare, they certainly shouldn't expect
the
> >businesses attendees to pay the IAAPA exhibit booth fee, and I would
expect
> >a modest per-diem--not $3.00 meals at Burger King (for example), but not
> >$50.00 meals at a fancy restaurant either.
>
> >
> >If I wanted to go to IAAPA just to explore the trade show floor and ride
the
> >rides--I better pay my own way.
>
> Trust me, the "official" ACE delegates do all of that. They'll act
> like martyrs, as usual, but it's all an act. Sure, they have an
> obligation, but they are paid quite well for that obligation.
>

I would expect that they could do that on their breaks, but if they are sent
there to represent ACE in a booth and are not doing their fair share of
representing, then I would at least question why they were able to attend
funded by ACE if they were not tending to the primary reason they were
there--to conduct ACE business.

> >Actually, I do. If they spend $6000, for example, to send six ACE members
to
> >IAAPA--sure, they would need close to 120 new membership dues to
replenish
> >those expenditures.
>
> You are assuming 100% of membership dues are profit. I'd say more
> like 10%, meaning they'd need 1200 folks, or a 15% increase in
> membership, to simply break even.
>

Okay, make it 10,000 memberships if you want. The point remains that if they
want to send members to IAAPA to represent ACE at IAAPA, from a state other
than where IAAPA is held, I would naturally assume that ACE would fund the
trip at some basic level (flight, hotel, exhibit fee, reasonable per-diem).

> >However, it guarantees that ACE would have a presence,
> >vs. asking someone who maybe has limited funds to pay their own way to
IAAPA
> >to represent ACE, only to have the arrangements get botched up, and that
> >person doesn't actually go to IAAPA.
>
> ACE is a volunteer organization. Volunteer <> getting a free trip to
> Orlando for 1 and a half days work.
>

It's not that cut and dry. Volunteer with travel and overnight lodging = the
expectation that some travel expenses will be covered by the organization,
if not all.

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 11:35:59 PM11/13/03
to
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 22:59:04 -0500, "Wolf" <bus...@adelphia.net>
wrote:

And that is perfectly OK, I don't want you to wear one either.

BaSSiStiSt

unread,
Nov 13, 2003, 11:55:57 PM11/13/03
to
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 20:27:21 -0800, "Daniel W. Rouse Jr."
<dwro...@nethere.comNOSPAM> wrote:

>"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message
>news:4p88rvc73jjju2qve...@4ax.com...

This pointless thread has been priceless just to see these two
converse. Mr. Literal, meet Mr. Antagonistic.

I see a goldmine in a sitcom featuring these two.

Mike Miller - I'm a reasonable man, get off my case

Sandy A. Nicolaysen

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 12:49:58 AM11/14/03
to

Mike: I agree. It's too funny seeing people here debate about how to
dress for "celebrities" that the GP have never heard of.

Go into your nearest pub/bar and ask them if they ever heard of:

Stan Cheketts
Mike Boodley
Jeff Pike
Tom Rebbie

You will be met with a blank stare.

Nobody outside of this group has any idea who designs and builds
coasters. I'm going to IAAPA wearing what is comfortable to ME.

Sadly, if you quiz the GP about coaster "celebrities", 1 out of 10
will mention Paul Reuben. That's sad. Very sad.

- Sandy

Wolf

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 1:22:14 AM11/14/03
to
> >> Who are you to tell me how to dress?
> >
> >Well I'm gonna tell you not to wear a bikini, anyway.
>
> And that is perfectly OK, I don't want you to wear one either.

I think we've reached an equitable agreement.

Daniel W. Rouse Jr.

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 1:24:28 AM11/14/03
to
"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sand...@erols.com> wrote in message
news:qlq8rvs0oc5uloplm...@4ax.com...
The "celebrity" thing was just an analogy.

And I certainly don't intend to get in a flamewar over this, that's for
sure.

I guess the bottom line is dress the way you want. But don't be surprised if
you do get "judged" based on what you wear, for better or for worse. The
original post--though it was worded with an attitude and ended with an
antagonistic dig--did have some very useful guidelines.

Wolfhounde

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 1:40:17 AM11/14/03
to
On 13 Nov 2003 07:42:18 -0800, ston...@aol.com (Mark Rosenzweig)
wrote:

Awwwww dammit, now I have to repack.

-Brian Ondrey
Send replies to: wolfh...@NOSPAMcomcast.net

"It's kind of fun to do the impossible."
--Walt Disney
A&B=LFCI

Larry Johnson

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 2:06:29 AM11/14/03
to


You guys knew that Mister Mullet would not take this lying down - it's
like waving a red flag in front of a Bull.....

Walt Breymier

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 4:12:35 AM11/14/03
to
On 14 Nov 2003 01:16:43 GMT, eric...@aol.com (EricB1980) wrote:

>Im a supposed "Carnie"
>
>and im kind of offended by the casual dress is ok, EVEN CARNIES SHOW UP.
>
>
>Loose the prejudice.


Nah, it's not a prejudice, at least not among these good folks. A
carnival operator is a carnival operator, but then there are carnies.

B is a subset of A, but not neccessary the rule.

Walt Breymier

edandkasey

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 4:35:25 AM11/14/03
to
While I can see your point, Matt the ACErs you addressing here make it
possible in part for you and the others to attend IAAPA. A question for you
Matt, does ACE publish a set of excepted guidelines for its' members, IE how
to dress for a convention? Is there a by-law that governs such matters? Is
there an article in one of your publications on not hanging out at the ACE
booth!

If not, I can't see how you can request this from your members here at RRC.
You are limiting yourself to such a small number of members by posting this
here, not only that, but this request for etiquette comes off more like a
slam on those members that do post or lurk here.

Ed Roberts
GM
Thrill-Ville USA
"Matthew Crowther" <mcro...@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:mcrowther-A9995...@news01.east.earthlink.net...

Charles Nungester

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 5:56:48 AM11/14/03
to
>From: bassi...@sbcglobal.net (BaSSiStiSt)

>This pointless thread has been priceless just to see these two
>converse. Mr. Literal, meet Mr. Antagonistic.
>
>I see a goldmine in a sitcom featuring these two.

>Mike Miller


They already did that one. It's calle the ODD COUPLE!
Charles Nungester
Coasters ridden standing up=3 Mantis, King Cobra and Chang
Coasters riddin sitting down= 213

William J. Buckley

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 6:17:20 AM11/14/03
to
Ed,

While I see YOUR point, you must realize that as a buyer (i.e. a "Park"),
you can dress however you like and Vendors don't care. They just want your
John Hancock on a contract of sale! If my memory serves me correctly, you
have worn *very* casual clothing to past IAAPA's...more so than other
Parks/buyers... but no one cared (realizing the above here).

While ACE does have a "Code of Conduct" set of guidelines for members, I'm
not sure if it specifically addresses member's behavior and/or attire for
attendance at business conventions. HOWEVER, I support Matt's post because
I remember when I was on the ACE Exec. Comm. and thus was privy to the fact
that then-President of IAAPA (Gina Somebody - that lady from Nelly Bly in
NYC) contacted ACE to report that she had received **numerous complaints
about ACE members** from other IAAPA members/exhibitors at the trade shows,
and that her office had been flooded with requests to "BAN ACE from the
trade show floor"!!! Sure, actions speak louder than words, but you have NO
IDEA what hoops Jan Kiser had to jump through to get IAAPA to ease-up on ACE
members and thwart the "no members on the floor" ban-in-progress. Y'all
were " " close from viewing IAAPA from the freaking lobby!

-B "that's why I don't support Flare's opinion here.....we ARE our own worst
enemy"


"edandkasey" <edand...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:xl1tb.197550$Tr4.565842@attbi_s03...

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 9:26:16 AM11/14/03
to
"William J. Buckley" <vze1...@verizon.netNONE> wrote in message news:<4R2tb.20705$hB5....@nwrdny02.gnilink.net>...

> Ed,
>
> While I see YOUR point, you must realize that as a buyer (i.e. a "Park"),
> you can dress however you like and Vendors don't care. They just want your
> John Hancock on a contract of sale! If my memory serves me correctly, you
> have worn *very* casual clothing to past IAAPA's...more so than other
> Parks/buyers... but no one cared (realizing the above here).
>
> While ACE does have a "Code of Conduct" set of guidelines for members, I'm
> not sure if it specifically addresses member's behavior and/or attire for
> attendance at business conventions. HOWEVER, I support Matt's post because
> I remember when I was on the ACE Exec. Comm. and thus was privy to the fact
> that then-President of IAAPA (Gina Somebody - that lady from Nelly Bly in
> NYC) contacted ACE to report that she had received **numerous complaints
> about ACE members** from other IAAPA members/exhibitors at the trade shows,
> and that her office had been flooded with requests to "BAN ACE from the
> trade show floor"!!! Sure, actions speak louder than words, but you have NO
> IDEA what hoops Jan Kiser had to jump through to get IAAPA to ease-up on ACE
> members and thwart the "no members on the floor" ban-in-progress. Y'all
> were " " close from viewing IAAPA from the freaking lobby!
>
> -B "that's why I don't support Flare's opinion here.....we ARE our own worst
> enemy"

OK, first, I'm getting scared that Buck is backing ACE, and especially
Matt.

Secondly, I must ask how many of those "numerous complaints" had to do
with ACErs wearing coaster t-shirts and shorts? I'd have to guess
ZERO!

I wouldn't be surprised if 100% of them were about ACTIONS of ACErs.
THAT is a totally different situation. Yes, ACErs have expectations
on their actions at IAAPA. That is absolutely true. But, I just
don't believe that ACE was about to be booted from IAAPA because of
dress code issues. Especially, since as YOU said, BUYERS come in all
sorts of dress, and ACE badges say BUYER on them.

And, SMELL is not a dress code issue. People will smell in a polo
shirt and chinos too.

If anyone is causing trouble for ACE, it is as I've ben saying for
years, it's the 23 to 30 people that think that since they have a
website about coasters, they're a media source and should get
interview time with all the coaster companies. THAT is a big problem.


Rastus O'Ginga

William J. Buckley

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 9:38:36 AM11/14/03
to

"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodcable.net> wrote in message
news:5deb1669.03111...@posting.google.com...

> Secondly, I must ask how many of those "numerous complaints" had to do


> with ACErs wearing coaster t-shirts and shorts? I'd have to guess
> ZERO!

Then you'd have guessed WRONG!


-B "it WAS mentioned as a problem..."


Flare

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 9:50:52 AM11/14/03
to

Larry Johnson wrote:
>
> You guys knew that Mister Mullet would not take this lying down - it's
> like waving a red flag in front of a Bull.....

This has nothing to do with Mulletron; and I totally agree with his
point of view. Why should anyone be telling someone else how to dress,
in this capacity? It's petty, and makes ACE, the club, look like a joke,
seeing as though one of its higher ups feels the urgency to parent other
members.

That said, if anything, Crowther's post should have been simple and to
the point, requesting that people, if they're going to openly
"Represent" the club, exercise sensibility at the show. Simple as that.
Phuck the June Cleaver, dress like this, do that crap.

I guess the buffet table mayhem at events over the years may have jaded
him. Hell, maybe he should have someone tail Hamburger, cause he talks
until those he's talking to are blue in the face.

Dave

Jacob Atkinson

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 11:46:48 AM11/14/03
to
Wow, must everyone take everything so frickin personally! The post was
actually a good post, check the recent subjects. There was at least
one separate topic that someone asked what the proper attire and/or
expectations of IAAPA was for an outsider. If everyone would just
settle down and take the post lightly, we'll be ok.

I am not one to tell anyone how to dress, and I have never been to
IAAPA. But this is still a business convention. Yes, it is a
convention that deals with businesses that deal with the public, and
we are welcome. But show a little respect. No matter what you think
Rastus, or anyone else, we are indeed judged by our appearances. We
all do it everyday. I don't deny it, and neither should anyone else. I
think it is human instinct. Why do you think CEO's and higher ups wear
suits and ties. No one is asking us to wear a suit and tie to this
thing, just look presentable. If I were to go, I would wear khakis and
a collared shirt, nothing more or less. The khakis are just because I
prefer them over jeans anyway.

Jacob

Fanning Flame

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 11:55:26 AM11/14/03
to
>From: ras...@kingwoodcable.net (Rastus O'Ginga)
>Date: 11/13/2003 10:29 AM Eastern Standard Time
>Message-id: <5deb1669.03111...@posting.google.com>

>WHy? I'm paying my own way to get in. There are no official dress
>codes. I mean, fuckin'-A, at the last IAAPA I went to there was a
>chick in a mermaid outfit, two bikini babes underwater, and a robot
>chick in a tight outfit flirting with attendees. I'm supposed to
>dress up for this?
>

If I recall, you registered using ACEs membership in IAAPA even if you
scratched their name off the badge, so in fact they did help pay your way in.

And as far as the mermaid outfit and bikini babes etc. they were there working
and being used to draw attention to the booths they were working for. If you
want to draw unwanted attention to yourself that is fine but using ACE to get
into the show means you need to make ACE look good.

>Yes, it should have, but it is par from the course from some EC
>members. I know Robb and Elissa were flat out told to leave the ACE
>booth last year. And remember, Elissa used to write for
>Rollercoaster! quite often.

Now this I will agree with. I was too told quite rudely by Matt to vacate the
ACE booth. Yes I agree we shouldn't be blocking the main table, but the people
I was talking to was not by the table but off to the side.

I don't have a problem with ACE paying for Members to attend. They do get
benefits from being there. I don't see putting them up at a 5 star hotel
though, although if that is what is convenient to the convention center then so
be it. I know the traffic there is horrendous as is parking.

edandkasey

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 12:47:14 PM11/14/03
to
Buck...

I am aware of the issues surrounding ACE being on the show floor and all the
flack ACE took for allowing it's members on the show floor and that some of
its members did act in a manner that did make ACE look bad. That brings me
back to my origingal question , do you publish this 'dress code' or 'code of
conduct' related to IAAPA behavior elsewhere or just on RRC, because of
PERSONAL concerns that 'certain' RRC/ACE members might act or dress
inappropriately?.

Would it not serve your club better to address these concerns privately? And
not in a public fourm such as this?

Ed Roberts
GM
Thrill-Ville USA

"William J. Buckley" <vze1...@verizon.netNONE> wrote in message
news:4R2tb.20705$hB5....@nwrdny02.gnilink.net...

Thom 25

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 3:12:33 PM11/14/03
to
Ed,

Get over it. Many in this forum have no experience with trade shows, and the
original post regarding IAAPA etiquette was generic. It should never have been
a spring board to all these senselesss posts, and IMO served as a good guide
for anyone going to the show.

As coaster enthusiasts, we all look bad when someone acts out of line
(frequently through no fault of their own). Private conversations are
appropriate to address specific situations. The original post did not point any
fingures, and IMO, it is posts like yours that brings RRC down - we spend more
time on no issues (like this), than coasters (which is very discouraging).

Tom

Keith Hopkins

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 3:23:27 PM11/14/03
to
Howard Johnson is right!

--
Keith "just think of your secretary" Hopkins
suss...@visi.comblock (clear the block to reply)
"You're turning this into an alt.sex group."


edandkasey

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 7:03:27 PM11/14/03
to
Tom,

It doesn't matter to me one way or the other how someone dresses at the
convention. After ten years I've seen some wild get ups. Thanks, but I got
over it after Miami in '94!

I still haven't gotten a straight answer though. Does ACE post this very
same request in one of its' publications that is mailed to the general
membership or is this just posted here? And if it is not posted in one of
its' newsletters or magazines then why not? Running a club means being fair
to all its' members, not just a select few.

Ed

"Thom 25" <tho...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20031114151233...@mb-m24.aol.com...

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 7:17:16 PM11/14/03
to
On 14 Nov 2003 08:46:48 -0800, coast...@yahoo.com (Jacob Atkinson)
wrote:


OK, let me get this right:

Things I can judge people on: Appearance

Things it's illegal to judge people on: race, age, sex

Hmmmmm...

Yes, plenty of folks judge people on thier appearance every day.
That's why St. Peter is so lonely. Again, there is certainly no
shortage of pathetic life forms on this planet who take it upon
themselves to judge people on appearance. At my job, I must deal with
those pathetic life forms (they usually congregate in leadership
meetings and tell each other how wonderful they are).

On my vacation, NOBODY tells me what to wear. Well, my wife tries,
but usually loses. If Mr. B, M, or Karnacs are offended by my dress,
fuck 'em I don't care. BUt, again, I refuse to believe that they WILL
care, as long as I don't stink or bother them, which I most definitely
will not do. Apparently, the complaints about ACE involved loitering,
with an added "dress" comment that would not have stood on its own.

I sure doubt that the folks in the dark zone will care. And the
numeraous salesmen I saw dressed down sure won't care. I always find
it funny that the ACE booth is full of people in suits, when the
booths selling millions of dollars in rides are full of folks in
chinos and polos. There's a bit of irony if you just look at it, that
goes quite well with this thread.

It's sad that so many people still equate professional look with
professionalism. I would have thought Enron, Tyco, Martha Stewart,
OJ, Wall Street mutual fund managers, and thousands of others would
have tought you a lesson by now. Every one of those situations
involved someone who dresses in the absolute finest clothes available.
But, it sure didn't mean shit when it came to their integrity.

I've heard about a guy named Jesus who walked around in sandles and
pajamas, and was sorta scruffy looking, but he did a few good things.

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 7:19:48 PM11/14/03
to
On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 00:03:27 GMT, "edandkasey"
<edand...@comcast.net> wrote:

>Tom,
>
>It doesn't matter to me one way or the other how someone dresses at the
>convention. After ten years I've seen some wild get ups. Thanks, but I got
>over it after Miami in '94!
>
>I still haven't gotten a straight answer though. Does ACE post this very
>same request in one of its' publications that is mailed to the general
>membership or is this just posted here? And if it is not posted in one of
>its' newsletters or magazines then why not? Running a club means being fair
>to all its' members, not just a select few.
>
>Ed

Heh, heh. I think we all know ACE is NOT fair to all its members.
THAT's for sure.

BUt, I have not seen anything in print about IAAPA. I could be wrong.
Since only a small % of members go, they probably don't do it. The
Code of Conduct is so vague it's absolutely worthless.

Rastus O'Ginga

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 7:22:14 PM11/14/03
to
On 14 Nov 2003 16:55:26 GMT, fannin...@aol.com (Fanning Flame)
wrote:

>>From: ras...@kingwoodcable.net (Rastus O'Ginga)
>>Date: 11/13/2003 10:29 AM Eastern Standard Time
>>Message-id: <5deb1669.03111...@posting.google.com>
>
>>WHy? I'm paying my own way to get in. There are no official dress
>>codes. I mean, fuckin'-A, at the last IAAPA I went to there was a
>>chick in a mermaid outfit, two bikini babes underwater, and a robot
>>chick in a tight outfit flirting with attendees. I'm supposed to
>>dress up for this?
>>
>
>If I recall, you registered using ACEs membership in IAAPA even if you
>scratched their name off the badge, so in fact they did help pay your way in.

Oh, ACE helped pay my way in? How? How does ACE get any money to do
that? Hmmm, maybe membership dues. WAIT! I pay those too!

>
>And as far as the mermaid outfit and bikini babes etc. they were there working
>and being used to draw attention to the booths they were working for. If you
>want to draw unwanted attention to yourself that is fine but using ACE to get
>into the show means you need to make ACE look good.

And the more important way to do that is by acting good. ACE isn't in
a pile of shit right now because someone was innappropriately dressed.

edandkasey

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 7:54:11 PM11/14/03
to
I think allot of this stems from the fact that when you have a club like
ACE, you are bound to have a few loose cannons as member, especially if you
don't screen your members. This is after all not a private club, so anyone
and their monkey can join. This coupled with the recent death at HW and
their dropping all enthusiasts events, I'm sure has made ACE's relationship
with IAAPA, and its' member parks that more strained.

I fully understand ACE is trying to save face by making sure its' members
keep up appearances, just be fair to all members. Since when did this become
ACErrc! 8^)

See you on the show floor.

Ed
(btw not an ace member... but that's another story!)


"Rastus O'Ginga" <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message

news:75sarvgvkeol5tuoc...@4ax.com...

David H.--REMOVE STOPSPAM to reply

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 10:13:26 PM11/14/03
to
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 09:26:32 -0800, "Daniel W. Rouse Jr."
<dwro...@nethere.comNOSPAM> wrote:

>
>If I wanted to go to IAAPA just to explore the trade show floor and ride the
>rides--I better pay my own way.
>> >

>> > The museum effort would probably also be a visible aspect at the ACE
>> > exhibit--although that is just my guess.
>>
>> This is the only viable reason to have someone there. But, I must ask
>> you if you think it is reasonable to pay someone to go to Orlando to
>> ask for donations for a non-profit organization. Do you see any logic
>> in that?


>>
>Actually, I do. If they spend $6000, for example, to send six ACE members to
>IAAPA--sure, they would need close to 120 new membership dues to replenish

>those expenditures. However, it guarantees that ACE would have a presence,


>vs. asking someone who maybe has limited funds to pay their own way to IAAPA
>to represent ACE, only to have the arrangements get botched up, and that
>person doesn't actually go to IAAPA.

ACE isn't actually there to sign up individual members. It's there to
further its relations in the industry.

Often business is done at the convention. For instance ACE will be
interviewing potential management companies for the group. Plans for
events are often worked on at IAAPA. ACE often gets invitations from parks
to hold future events at IAAPA. IN addition, they are promoting the museum
in the hopes of getting donations in the future. Sometimes, ACE gets news
on future coasters. And with manufacturers and parks from all over the
world attending, ACE can get more accurate information for its coaster
census.

>> > Note that I am not going to IAAPA, but I have attended a couple of local
>> > computer conventions in the past years. Those who wore
>> > T-shirt/shorts/flip-flops, and other laid-back attire looked rather out
>of
>> > place at a computer event held in a convention center... even in the
>> > shopping areas.
>>
>> And you know what, I bet they didn't give a damn what you think.
>>
>Fair enough, it doesn't matter what I think. But when many of the presenters
>and vendors there were at least dressed business casual, and many of the
>attendees are at least dressed business casual, it just looks sort of odd
>when someone is there dressed up for the beach.

Don't bother trying to even suggest to Rastus that he looks presentable.

At least this year, he won't have ACE on his name badge.


David Hamburger, davi...@STOPSPAMbellatlantic.net, Boston, MA
PLEASE remove "STOPSPAM" from my address when replying via e-mail.

"Patriotism means to stand by the country. It does not mean to stand by
the president or any other public official, save exactly to the degree
in which he himself stands by the country. It is patriotic to support
him insofar as he efficiently serves the country. It is unpatriotic not
to oppose him to the exact extent that by inefficiency or otherwise he
fails in his duty to stand by the country. In either event, it is
unpatriotic not to tell the truth, whether about the president or
anyone else."
-- Theodore Roosevelt

William J. Buckley

unread,
Nov 14, 2003, 11:57:33 PM11/14/03
to

"edandkasey" <edand...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:By8tb.150303$9E1.754807@attbi_s52...
> Would it not serve -->your<-- club better to address these concerns

privately? And
> not in a public fourm such as this?

MY club?!?!? Hardly............

Wolf

unread,
Nov 15, 2003, 1:39:51 AM11/15/03
to
> Howard Johnson is right!

I think I'm staying there for IAAPA, actually...

PINK FLOYD FANATIC

unread,
Nov 15, 2003, 2:21:28 AM11/15/03
to
Rastus O'Ginga <ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote in message news:<burarvglfv93dpq6q...@4ax.com>...

I agree 100%. If I wear a bright black coaster T-Shirt that looks
almost brand new and not faded and nice black jean w/ nice boots and
have my hair (growing it long)neatly combed anyone who has a problem
with that can go screw themeselves. OTOH if I wore a faded T-Shirt
with rips, holes and/or rough rattey edges with faded ripped and/or
hole filled jeans or cut-offs and have my hair in a sloppy mess or any
of those I can understand why people would get offended. But if I do
go (maybe next year since I have no vacation time or money now)in the
future I may wear my new black button down slipover shirt that I just
got from the future (proposed) "Moon Resort & Casino" with my nicest
black pair of jean and gray boots. But than someone may think that I
am a customer wearing that shirt.


BUt, again, I refuse to believe that they WILL
> care, as long as I don't stink or bother them, which I most definitely
> will not do. Apparently, the complaints about ACE involved loitering,
> with an added "dress" comment that would not have stood on its own.

I too would doubt there are too many complaints solely on dress alone
unless you are dress sloppily. If you wear a NICE pair of jeans and a
NICE LOOKING T-Shirt I'd think there would be very few complaints.


>
> I sure doubt that the folks in the dark zone will care. And the
> numeraous salesmen I saw dressed down sure won't care. I always find
> it funny that the ACE booth is full of people in suits, when the
> booths selling millions of dollars in rides are full of folks in
> chinos and polos. There's a bit of irony if you just look at it, that
> goes quite well with this thread.
>
> It's sad that so many people still equate professional look with
> professionalism. I would have thought Enron, Tyco, Martha Stewart,
> OJ, Wall Street mutual fund managers, and thousands of others would
> have tought you a lesson by now. Every one of those situations
> involved someone who dresses in the absolute finest clothes available.
> But, it sure didn't mean shit when it came to their integrity.
>

Ain't that the (BLEEP)ing truth!! Way too many people in suits & ties
acting like A-holes trying to crap on other people. There was this
very fat lady, a manager at my former employer who I couldn't stand
and her size had NOTHING to do with it! She happens to have this
almighty "I'm better than you and mine crap doesn't stink but yours
does" attitude. And she seems to think the company does NO wrong and
that sweatshops overseas (like Nike) that pay extreme poverty wages
are doing the people(the workers) a favor by giving them a job. If I
work at a factory with extremely crappy, dirty, unhealthy working
conditions for $2 a day and get beaten by my boss for an honest
mistake or error I'd walk out and tell them where to stick it(where
the sun don't shine)!

> I've heard about a guy named Jesus who walked around in sandles and
> pajamas, and was sorta scruffy looking, but he did a few good things.

He was PERFECT and NEVER did anything wrong but stupid judgmental
idiots would think's he's bad or worthless just because of his
appearance! That is what happens when way too many people are smoking
crack and rot whatever little brains they have left, they look at the
outside instead of the inside!

mrjah

unread,
Nov 15, 2003, 3:47:29 AM11/15/03
to
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 18:17:16 -0600, Rastus O'Ginga
<ras...@kingwoodXXXXXcable.net> wrote:

>I've heard about a guy named Jesus who walked around in sandles and
>pajamas, and was sorta scruffy looking, but he did a few good things.

If Jesus somehow found IAAPA important enough to warrant an appearance, he would
probably get a bit more leeway in the attire department than the rest of us.
Not to mention the fact that 2000 year ago, people had to do LOTS of day-to-day
things in ways we can't imagine now. ...Not a good reason to replicate them.

Having seen IAAPA from both sides of the booth, I can assure you that situations
do occur in which some scruffy individual in a coaster T-shirt and shorts
manages to interrupt -- by voice or uncomfortable proximity -- a conversation
between an exhibitor and a buyer. I have seen it happen. Thing is, the
interruptor doesn't really recognize it -- although the interruptees certainly
do. And depending on the individual's shirt or other, um, flair, it's often
QUITE a simple task to associate him/her with a particular organization.

Is this fair? [shrugs] From what I see, it comes down to a difference between
communities. Enthusiasts are there because they're enthusiastic. Exhibitors
are there because their continued livelihood depends, sometimes critically, on
relationships in the industry. IAAPA is one vehicle for that. Yes, it's
Orlando. Yes, it's amusement rides. But the accountant at your favorite ride
company is using exactly the same principles as the accountant at your
octogenarian neighbor's favorite incontinence products company. At a certain
level, all for-profit businesses are essentially the same. At that level it
has almost nothing to do with what you're selling. The product is immaterial.
The goal is to generate wealth from less wealth, and that's the only reason the
IAAPA trade show really exists.

I don't know about you folks, but this actually makes me uncomfortable on the
show floor at times. The trade show is basically a large wealth redistribution
machine. If you aren't professionally involved in it, you're just wandering
through it with its begrudging permission (or rather, just because it hasn't
explicitly forbidden you from being there), watching the gears turn without
really touching anything of importance. It's a little creepy, actually. But
anyway, back to something near Rastus' point...

Trade shows in general -- even for neato electronics and amusement devices --
tend to reflect mainstream business' collective comfort level with
nonthreatening, predictable behavior and soothing conversation. This,
obviously, is why exhibitors try to look nice, keep their part of the floor
clean, be generally inoffensive, etc. Sales is hard, even if you're good at it.
Most sales attempts end in failure, or success only after a very long period of
patience, often measured in years. A controlled environment -- moonbounces and
Segways notwithstanding -- is a plus for exhibitors trying to attract money in
return for goods and services. And when business operations get interrupted by
someone who is essentially wandering the floor of the giant conference machine
in an observer role, the whole dynamic can get abruptly and uncomfortably
smooshed. This might require a particularly abrupt and poorly-timed
interruptor, and a particularly intolerant exhibitor, but both exist. The net
effect is that the exhibitor feels the "offender" is poking at the gears with a
long stick to see what happens. Without permission. That's a no-no. More
specifically, the exhibitor feels that HIS or HER gears are being poked. And
when a complaint rolls into IAAPA's inbox (virtual or real), they don't care how
cranky the exhibitor was. They want to make sure the exhibitor is back next
year, possibly with the need for a larger space.

I honestly believe that in the cases I have seen, the enthusiast usually didn't
mean to cause any harm. S/he either simply didn't understand the nature of the
situation, or was a bit googly-eyed over seeing a ride company of particular
interest. Only in one particular case did s/he appear to take a certain
antagonistic pride in interrupting the prevailing business dynamic with
something that approached "short spittle-laced tirade" status. So usually
there's no malevolent intent. But all thre