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Anyone else like analog tuning

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Pierre L

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Nov 6, 2003, 1:48:19 PM11/6/03
to
I have two very good digital tuning shortwave radios, one with synchronous
sideband, but I find myself choosing to play with and listen to the little
analog tuning portable I have most of the time. I like to be able to scan
the bands by hand with the dial and to see where I am. When I let the
digital do this automatically, it just doesn't seem the same. I just don't
derive the same pleasure from the digital tuning, and I have no plans to
ever be a part of digital radio.

Anyone else feel like that? Maybe it's because my first shortwave was in the
1960's.

Pierre


Gray Shockley

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Nov 6, 2003, 2:22:23 PM11/6/03
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On Thu, 6 Nov 2003 12:48:19 -0600, Pierre L wrote
(in message <SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>):

I /love/ digital tuning.

All the sw radio's I had in the fifties and sixties were, of course, analog
and I can remember having QSLs refused because I was a little off on the
stations' transmit frequency.

Perhaps my favorite feature of digital control is that it makes possible
memories which I use a whole lot.

But at least three out of my four sw radios /have/ analog tuning so - if I
feel like it - I can "scan the bands".


Gray Shockley
-----------------------
DX-392 DX-398
RX-320 DX-399
CCradio w/RS Loop
Torus Tuner (3-13 MHz)
Select-A-Tenna
-----------------------
Vicksburg, MS US


Frank Dresser

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Nov 6, 2003, 4:46:04 PM11/6/03
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"Pierre L" <pier...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com...

I prefer analog tuning if the tuning mechanism has a minimal amount of
drive friction and backlash. Flywheel tuning is a nice bonus. Some of
the analog tuning radios are pretty stiff and/or sloppy, though.

I like to give the knob a quick spin, watch the indicator and hear which
bands are hot. It's not the same with a digital set, especially the
ones the chuff with tuning.

I'm sure digital would suit me better if I were DXing or QSLing. Mostly
now, I just park it on a good clear signal and listen to the
programming.

Frank Dresser

Mark Harper

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Nov 6, 2003, 4:47:43 PM11/6/03
to
In article <SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>, pierrot51
@hotmail.com once wrote .......


I'm not really fussed either way, Digital is obviously better for utility
and data....

However I do like analogue meters - none of these marker/counter digital
types - and to think i part-ex an R-2000 for an R-75 - I should have kept
the 2000 and still bought the 75!

--
Mark (MW1MDH)

Diverd4777

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Nov 6, 2003, 5:51:03 PM11/6/03
to
I have three sets,
two digital & one analogue with a Digital readout.

The analogue is fine for " scanning the bands" to see who'se broadcasting right
now..
- But I Love the combination Tuning Knob / Digital readout on my R-75;
and all the memories.. ! ! !

For a portable, the Sangean 606A with 50+ memories & a Digital readout is about
perfect.. I don't know how you'd incorporate an accuate tuning knob into such a
small , inexpensive set

Dan


In article <SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Pierre L"
<pier...@hotmail.com> writes:

>Subject: Anyone else like analog tuning
>From: "Pierre L" <pier...@hotmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2003 13:48:19 -0500

RHF

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Nov 6, 2003, 10:16:11 PM11/6/03
to
Pierre,

If by "Analog Tuning" you mean a Main Tuning Knob that you can turn
and click off the the Hz one by one: Then the Answer is Y E S !

Being "Limited" by Up and Down Tuning Buttoms that only spet-up or
step-down a fixed number of kHz leaves me feeling that I have missed
something that may have been 'in-between-everything'.

Memories and Pre-Sets are nice to recall those "Finds" that have been
Found.
- But it the "Joy-of-Finding" the FIND that for Me is the Fun and
Mystery of Shortwave Listening.
- - That monent in time when you say - What's That ?
- - - As Your Mind Comes Alive !

Memories in the corner of My Mind :
- A Magical Watercolor of Sounds.
- - A Staccato of Static and Noise.
- - - The Silence in the In-Between.
The Mind "Wraps" It All into One !
. . . memories, Memories. MEMORIES !


~ RHF
.
.
= = = "Pierre L" <pier...@hotmail.com>
= = = wrote in message news:<SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>...

N8KDV

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Nov 7, 2003, 6:11:53 AM11/7/03
to

RHF wrote:

> Pierre,
>
> If by "Analog Tuning" you mean a Main Tuning Knob that you can turn
> and click off the the Hz one by one: Then the Answer is Y E S !
>
> Being "Limited" by Up and Down Tuning Buttoms that only spet-up or
> step-down a fixed number of kHz leaves me feeling that I have missed
> something that may have been 'in-between-everything'.
>
> Memories and Pre-Sets are nice to recall those "Finds" that have been
> Found.
> - But it the "Joy-of-Finding" the FIND that for Me is the Fun and
> Mystery of Shortwave Listening.
> - - That monent in time when you say - What's That ?
> - - - As Your Mind Comes Alive !
>
> Memories in the corner of My Mind :
> - A Magical Watercolor of Sounds.
> - - A Staccato of Static and Noise.
> - - - The Silence in the In-Between.
> The Mind "Wraps" It All into One !
> . . . memories, Memories. MEMORIES !

What blend are you smoking these days? :-)

Robert Herschbach

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Nov 7, 2003, 8:22:11 AM11/7/03
to
I'd like to be able to listen for transatlantic MW stations on my car radio
while driving, but that's hard to do since digitally tuned car radios only
give you the 10khz spacing. That might be an example where analog had some
benefits.


"Pierre L" <pier...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com...

Frank White

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Nov 7, 2003, 9:30:57 AM11/7/03
to
In article <SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>,
pier...@hotmail.com says...

Ah yes. For mystery, excitement, and the thrill of discovery,
digital has nothing on slowly turning that knob and as the
indicator creeps across the spectrum, listening for the
voices, music, or lack of static that tells you yes, there
IS something there.

Digital is good for when you know where you want to go.
Analog is for finding out what's out there.

FW


Jim Hackett

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Nov 7, 2003, 10:12:00 AM11/7/03
to
You hit the nail on the head with your assessment!

Llgpt

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Nov 7, 2003, 10:17:39 AM11/7/03
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>Subject: Re: Anyone else like analog tuning
>From: "Jim Hackett" jim...@earthstink.net
>Date: 11/7/2003 9:12 AM Central Standard Time
>Message-id: <4DOqb.956$6c3...@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>
Here is a perfect analogy of that.

When the R-390 series of receivers were put into use by the military, the
intercept operators continued to use the Hammarlund SP-600 receivers for
"spotting receivers", the tuning was fast and much easier to cruise through the
frequencies than the R-390's and later the R-390A's.


Les Locklear
Gulfport, Ms.

William Mutch

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Nov 7, 2003, 10:50:39 AM11/7/03
to
In article <SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com>, pierrot51
@hotmail.com says...

"snip"

> Anyone else feel like that? Maybe it's because my first shortwave was in the
> 1960's.
>
> Pierre
>

Mine was in the fifties.

A. I prefer analog when I'm prowling the bands looking for
something interesting. I still love my NC-125 for this with its low
friction antibacklash flywheel knob'd bandspread. The Sony ICF 2010 is
useless; chuffing. The Sat 800 is pretty darn good.


B. I prefer digital when I'm looking for something specific and
know a frequency to keystroke and execute. I really like the Sat 800
for this, using my fat stubby digits for digital entry. The ICF 2010 is
pretty good, fast! I use a pencil eraser to get at those tiny buttons.
The NC-125 is near useless for this as I no longer have a calibration
marker generator, though my handmade calibration charts for the
principle bands will get me there eventually.


Pierre L

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Nov 7, 2003, 1:29:50 PM11/7/03
to
Yes, that's exactly the way I feel about it.
Pierre

"Frank White" <fwhite*NOSPAM*@colfax.com> wrote in message
news:bogab1$slt$1...@news.fsr.net...

Soliloquy

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Nov 7, 2003, 10:41:26 PM11/7/03
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"Pierre L" <pier...@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:SHwqb.8438$Pg1.4...@news20.bellglobal.com:


The Neurosis of the digital age. Admittedly people have their
preferences, and though I am fond of digital displays, I too find it much
more enjoyable to use analog tuning when searching the dial for
frequencies.

Regards

--
Never say never.
Nothing is absolute.

Mark Rehorst

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Nov 8, 2003, 12:21:54 AM11/8/03
to
Try an SX-190. Analog all the way, and rock stable because the first
oscillator is crystal controlled. Nice, big, solid metal knob for
tuning. The dial on mine is accurate to within a kHz or so from one
end of any 500 kHz band to the other. There is a built in calibrator
that gives you 100 KHz and 25 kHz markers.

I also have a synthesized Sony radio. It has no tuning knob, only a
keypad, so tuning is either by direct freq entry or holding a button
down until the radio starts scanning. If you step up or down it goes
in 5 kHz hops. There is a pot you can use to fine tune +/- 3 kHz or
so it seems. There is a switch that allows 9 kHz channel hopping on
the MW band, but it is located behind the batteries inside the radio.

I used to have an R1051b. A brute of a receiver. Worked great, but
tuning was a major pain. I was using dumbells to build up my forearms
so I could tune the thing. I don't think there is a more stable radio
than that one. The ISB mode -both sidebands through two separate
detectors and audio paths allows for very accurate exhalted carrier AM
listening. Tuning in that mode is very interesting- as you move the
frequency the audio appears garbled in one ear then moves to both ears
and becomes ungarbled, then moves out the other ear becoming garbled
again. Great for stereo headphone listening!

MR

starman

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Nov 8, 2003, 12:41:06 AM11/8/03
to

It really depends on the particular analog and digital receivers you're
comparing. Using the tuning knob of my R8B at the 1-Khz rate, I can scan
an HF band as fast as any of my old Hallicrafters. Several hundred Khz
per second if you want to go that fast to see if a band is 'open'.
There's no muting and the synthesizer can keep up with that tuning rate.


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Mark Keith

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Nov 8, 2003, 1:04:07 AM11/8/03
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"Robert Herschbach" <ra...@toast.net> wrote in message news:<3fab...@news03.toast.net>...

> I'd like to be able to listen for transatlantic MW stations on my car radio
> while driving, but that's hard to do since digitally tuned car radios only
> give you the 10khz spacing. That might be an example where analog had some
> benefits.

Just depends on the radio. Not all digital tuning radios are the same.
I much prefer digital overall, but mine gives you the best of both
worlds. You can tune in many different rates, and there is no chuffing
or any artifacts , no matter what rate you use. Also, if you go slow
enough, the sound and feel is just like analog. My IC-706mk2g has ten
different tuning rates. Single cycle, 10 cycle, 100 cycle, 1kc, 5 kc,
9 kc,10 kc, 12.5 kc, 20 kc, 25 kc, 100 kc. On HF and MW I use 1 kc the
most. Only with the higher quality SW radios were the analog readouts
very accurate. IE: old collins, drakes, etc..Another thing I like
about the digital, or mine at least, is when I dial the readout, I end
up perfectly on freq. IE: say I tune to 14.200 using the 1 kc rate.
I'm exactly on freq. 14.200.000. No farting around. So if I'm on 75m,
and tune 3850-51-52-53, etc, each one is right on the money ???.000...
:)
This is more important to SSB than AM of course...MK

WShoots1

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Nov 8, 2003, 7:24:31 PM11/8/03
to
Maybe someone should come out with a radio that has both an analog dial and a
digital readout.

Ad to that knob tuning with a variable tuning rate, the speed determined upon
how much pressure is put upon the knob. Of course, that would require servo
motor drive. But I'm thinking of touch-sensitive keys on a synthesizer. Maybe
improving the up-down buttons on the radio. I hate the time-held and the manual
speed switching methods.

Bill, K5BY

Stinger

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Nov 8, 2003, 7:35:59 PM11/8/03
to

"WShoots1" <wsho...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20031108192431...@mb-m01.aol.com...

> Maybe someone should come out with a radio that has both an analog dial
and a
> digital readout.


I think the Grundig S350 is exactly that. I haven't used one, but that is
what I understand the features are.

-- Stinger


Soliloquy

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Nov 8, 2003, 8:59:05 PM11/8/03
to
wsho...@aol.com (WShoots1) wrote in
news:20031108192431...@mb-m01.aol.com:

We use voltmeters at work daily. The old-timers all had Analog Simpsons
and Tripletts, the company now buys digital Fluke and Greenlee Meters. Of
course, the old-timers hated the digital stuff, but the analog meters do
have their virtues.

One major virtue of the analog meter is the quick response of the
display. Apparently the digital meters require a sample time before
posting the display. With extremely transient voltages (faulty
connections), this can be problematic.

Also, slight variations in the measured value can be quite a nuisance
when viewing with a digital meter, the analog display seem to offer a
more "human eye" friendly version of the values.

Lastly, and by no means leastly, digital meters with very high input
impedance are prone to reading ghost voltages. By this I mean voltages
that are imparted into parallel conductors in the same conduit run, but
are not significant in terms of operation. We commonly read ghost
voltages of about 60 Volts, but we use 120 and 28 Volts as control and
indicator light voltages.

When you use an analog meter, since the input impedance is far less, you
don't read the ghost voltages. My Digital Fluke has a "Voltage Check"
feature that will alter the impedance of the input, from 20K ohms with
little input voltage, and ramps that input impedance up as the voltage
increases, to eliminate the possibility of damaging the meter or the
user.

Radio Shack offers/ed a voltmeter with an analog display that had
protection for incorrect polarity on the DC scales. No need to worry
about reverse polarity obliterating the meter movement, the Radio Shack
model had a small LED that indicated polarity, with the meter movement
always being in the same direction. Neat Idea.

The arbitrary sacrifice of Analog Displays by the younger generations is
truly a sad thing. I have seen teenagers unable to tell the time on an
analog clock.

Clock trivia, notice the display on clocks that use Roman numerals. It
goes I, II, III, IIII, IV, V, VI, VII, IX, X, XI, XII. Standard Roman
numerals denote IIII as IV. The Non-Standard application above is used to
keep symmetry in the display, keeping the character use in units of 4. (4
all Is, 4 with Vs, 4 with Xs) Not all clock with Roman numerals use this
system, but the use is widespread..

We do not have digital minds, and digital electronics are not necessarily
bringing the bliss to society that the modern public has been programmed
to believe.

Regards.

Jim

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Nov 8, 2003, 9:11:07 PM11/8/03
to
i had an old firestone console all my childhood and early adulthood. it
had flywheel tuning that must of weighed a pound, split-gear backlash
control and 6v6 output tubes into a 12 inch speaker. even my cheap
sangean portables that i have now are far superior in every way but one.
there is little satisfaction with any of them. i am not "one with my
radio" like i once was. my old radio was an extension of my senses....
like a telescope that allows me to see all the way around the world. the
new ones are like watching it all on web cam. maybe my brain interfaces
better to the radio with analog. to use digital requires a conscious
thought with every keystroke. spinning that knob is a more instinctive
action.

starman

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Nov 9, 2003, 12:45:47 AM11/9/03
to

Have you ever used a digital receiver with a tuning knob? The better
ones all have a knob in addition to the keypad.

RHF

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Nov 9, 2003, 4:29:37 AM11/9/03
to
= = = "Stinger" <con...@newsserveronly.com>
= = = wrote in message news:<RYfrb.66316$un....@bignews6.bellsouth.net>...


Stinger,

That's about it the Grundig S350 radio fits the niche between the GE
Superadio III and the CCRadioPlus+.

It has Two (2) Speed Annalog Tuning Knob and a Digital Frequency
Display.

Plus more AM/MW DXing features then either the the GE Superadio III or
the CCRadioPlus+


~ RHF

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Grundig-S-350/

.

.

Dave Moorman

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Nov 9, 2003, 9:49:47 AM11/9/03
to
In article <RYfrb.66316$un....@bignews6.bellsouth.net>,
"Stinger" <con...@newsserveronly.com> wrote:

> > Maybe someone should come out with a radio that has both an analog dial
> and a
> > digital readout.
>
>
> I think the Grundig S350 is exactly that. I haven't used one, but that is
> what I understand the features are.
>
> -- Stinger

Many years ago, sonny, many radios had analog tuning and a digital
readout. State of the art back then!

Dave K9SW

Stinger

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Nov 9, 2003, 9:06:24 AM11/9/03
to
If it's anywhere near as much fun to use as my little $40 Grundig FR-200,
it's a great little radio.

-- Stinger

"RHF" <rhf-...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:e5e13af8.03110...@posting.google.com...

Pierre L

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Nov 9, 2003, 1:43:43 PM11/9/03
to

"starman" <sta...@tech.net> wrote in message
news:3FADD48B...@tech.net...

>
> Have you ever used a digital receiver with a tuning knob? The better
> ones all have a knob in addition to the keypad.
>

I think there's more to it than the type of knob. I think it may be seeing
the actual tuning scales. Our minds probably function more as a super analog
computer, and analog things are easier to see and judge. Same as with
digital watches vs those with hands, I guess. We can see numbers on a
digital display, but we can't see the pattern they fit in.
Pierre


donutbandit

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Nov 9, 2003, 3:14:03 PM11/9/03
to
starman <sta...@tech.net> wrote in news:3FADD48B...@tech.net:

> Have you ever used a digital receiver with a tuning knob? The better
> ones all have a knob in addition to the keypad.

Yep, and I have yet to find one that isn't a PITA.

RHF

unread,
Nov 9, 2003, 4:04:57 PM11/9/03
to
Stinger,

What I like about the Grundig S350 is that I can "Tune" and 'operate'
the radio with my Big old Fingers and Tired old Eyes (without
glasses).

GoTo=> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Grundig-S-350/

The GS350 'sounds good' and is very portable with a very long battery
life just like the GE Superadios and the CCRadios.


~ RHF
.
.

= = = "Stinger" <con...@newsserveronly.com>

= = = wrote in message news:<ntsrb.54570$SV2....@bignews3.bellsouth.net>...


> If it's anywhere near as much fun to use as my little $40 Grundig FR-200,
> it's a great little radio.
>
> -- Stinger
>

Carl Solomon

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Nov 9, 2003, 4:11:09 PM11/9/03
to
The best of both worlds for me was analog tuning (happened to be an
HQ-180) with an external frequency counter for digital readout. That
enabled rapid scanning of the SW spectrum without having to search in 1
MHz segments, or have the tuning speed go so fast that everything would
go "pip...pip...pip...etc". And I could go back and find anything! Only
thing it lacked were memories. Frequency stability wasn't what today's
solid-state digital radios are, but it was quite acceptable. No digital
radio I'm aware of could match that for browsing thru the bands and
"stoping on a dime" with a precise frequency reading when hearing
something of interest.

/Carl - W5SU

Pierre L wrote:

>I have two very good digital tuning shortwave radios, one with synchronous
>sideband, but I find myself choosing to play with and listen to the little

>analog tuning portable I have most of the time. I like to be able to scan

Stinger

unread,
Nov 9, 2003, 4:45:45 PM11/9/03
to
I notice it's not very expensive, either. You guys told me I'd be
collecting radios ;^)

-- Stinger
"RHF" <rhf-...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:e5e13af8.03110...@posting.google.com...

WShoots1

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Nov 10, 2003, 12:37:35 AM11/10/03
to
Stinger: << I think the Grundig S350 is exactly that. I haven't used one, but

that is what I understand the features are. >>

No, the 350 is about like the jWIN, tuning-wise. What I'd like is an analog
dial with analog tuning, but with a digital readout to provide the actual
frequency (as opposed to using crystal markers and analog dial correction). It
would require an analog receiver, with a frequency counter that would read the
freq diff between the LO and the IF output. Or something like that.

Bill, K5BY

WShoots1

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Nov 10, 2003, 12:44:01 AM11/10/03
to
K9SW: << Many years ago, sonny, many radios had analog tuning and a digital
readout. State of the art back then! >>

Please refresh my memory, Dave OM. Since 1945, I've worked on many things,
military and civilian, made all over the world, and I don't recall any. I'm not
referring to features like that of the Collins R390, which is just a mechanical
version of the Grundigs. I'm looking for a real analog dial and real analog
tuning, but with a digital readout a la the Grundigs.

Tnx es 73,
Bill, K5BY

WShoots1

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Nov 10, 2003, 12:53:36 AM11/10/03
to
Jim: << i had an old firestone console all my childhood and early adulthood. it

had flywheel tuning that must of weighed a pound, split-gear backlash control
and 6v6 output tubes into a 12 inch speaker. even my cheap sangean portables
that i have now are far superior in every way but one. there is little
satisfaction with any of them. i am not "one with my radio" like i once was. my
old radio was an extension of my senses.... >>

There ya go... It's not that I'm old and jaded that I look upon modern radios
as appliances. It's because of like you so well stated.

Back in my early ham days, peaking and dipping transmitters, for instance, was
part of the fun. That's why I liked the marine work I did before retirement.
One still had to dip and peak the shipboard transmitters.

I enjoyed working on old foreign made tube type receivers, too. When they
worked right and the band was open, there was none of that confounded noise
floor inherent in solid state receivers. If a station was transmitting anywhere
in the world, it probably could be heard.

(Sigh...)
Bill, K5BY

Mark S. Holden

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Nov 10, 2003, 1:12:46 AM11/10/03
to

Here's a place that sells a kit for a compact LCD frequency display that does exactly what you'd want. They can be programed for a variety of IF frequencies.

He's recently added two new options- a txco reference oscillator and a fluorescent display.

<http://www.aade.com/dfd.htm>

He seemed like a nice guy when I bought a kit from him.

Tony Meloche

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Nov 10, 2003, 1:22:39 AM11/10/03
to

WShoots1 wrote:
>
> Jim: << i had an old firestone console all my childhood and early adulthood. it
> had flywheel tuning that must of weighed a pound, split-gear backlash control
> and 6v6 output tubes into a 12 inch speaker. even my cheap sangean portables
> that i have now are far superior in every way but one. there is little
> satisfaction with any of them. i am not "one with my radio" like i once was. my
> old radio was an extension of my senses.... >>


I don't neccesarily long to go back to that time, but I do remember
it - my first DX machine was a 1937 Zenith console. One huge round
glass window as the dial face, with a "magic eye" tuner, and two 6L6GC's
as the output (one of which was removed because the caps were so bad
that it hummed unbearably with both of them in). The actual dial knob
was about the size of a fifty-cent piece, but the cap of a Right Guard
aerosol can (remember that stuff?) fit over it perfectly, and gave extra
leverage to the flywheel. Oh, to give that a good, snapping twist and
watch that dial pointer swing so smooooothly half-way across the dial .
. .

But I used *it* then, and I'm using a *modern* rig now, and the
modern rigs are better in almost every way but one - the romance of it.
But nostalgia ain't what it used to be, either. One week with the old
Zentih now, and I'd probably be begging for my R75 back.

Tony


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J

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Nov 10, 2003, 2:53:04 AM11/10/03
to

Pierre L wrote:

> I have two very good digital tuning shortwave radios, one with synchronous
> sideband, but I find myself choosing to play with and listen to the little
> analog tuning portable I have most of the time. I like to be able to scan
> the bands by hand with the dial and to see where I am. When I let the
> digital do this automatically, it just doesn't seem the same. I just don't
> derive the same pleasure from the digital tuning, and I have no plans to
> ever be a part of digital radio.
>
> Anyone else feel like that? Maybe it's because my first shortwave was in the
> 1960's.
>
> Pierre
>
>

I have a Grundig YB-400, a Sony 7600, an ICOM r71A, and an old aalog
Panasonic RF-2200. The 2200 eats the others for lunch (except the ICOM,
of course), and is the most enjoyable SW set for band scanning.

P

J

unread,
Nov 10, 2003, 2:55:13 AM11/10/03
to
The 350 lacks SSB, though.

RHF

unread,
Nov 10, 2003, 3:41:03 AM11/10/03
to
Stinger,

For most Radio-A-holics each prize posession (radio) involves a Love /
Hate Replationship.

As a Grundig S350 Radio Owner; I would say:
"The GS350 is the Best Radio You Will Love To Hate for Under $100 !"
* Love It for All the Things It Does !
* * Hate It for All the Things It Is Just Not Quite !


~ RHF
.
.
= = = "Stinger" <con...@newsserveronly.com>

= = = wrote in message news:<rwzrb.71902$un.3...@bignews6.bellsouth.net>...

RHF

unread,
Nov 10, 2003, 5:53:19 AM11/10/03
to
"J"

That is very true but the Grundig S350 (Tecsun BCL-2000) is designed
and met to be a Broad Cast Listeners (BCL) Radio and nothing more.

Simply think of the Grundig S350 as something 'in-between'
the CCRadioPlus+ ($160) and the GE Superadio III ($60) :

+ Shortwave Bands Coverage.

+ A little 'old time' Panasonic RF-2200/2900/2600 styling from the 1970s.

+ All for about $100.


jagrcl ~ RHF
- - - Just another Grundig Radio Cheer Leader !
.
.
= = = J <nam...@hotmail.com>
= = = wrote in message news:<vquh3dj...@corp.supernews.com>...


>
> The 350 lacks SSB, though.
>


Also there is "NO" BFO for SSB & CW either ;-(
- - - BuT Hey! It's a "ONLY" a Broad Cast Listeners (BCL) Radio :o)

WShoots1

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Nov 10, 2003, 6:26:21 PM11/10/03
to
Thanks, Mark. It could be interesting to try adding that LCD display to the
little Bell & Howell. That may nor be possible, though. It has a big do all
chip in it that may prevent accessing the desired point in the circuit.

But I can think of a lot of old tube types, military and civilian, that such a
dislay would be great to have and possible to connect to.

I have a good Optoelectronics frequency counter, which I'll probably need to
use in the investigation.

Bill, K5BY

elfa

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Nov 10, 2003, 6:27:49 PM11/10/03
to
In article <20031110004401...@mb-m15.aol.com>, WShoots1 says...

I got something like that. A Panasonic RF-B300....but no analog dial.

http://www.dxing.com/rx/rfb300.htm

It's no 2010 but I got it at a garage sale for $1 (mint condition).

elfa

WShoots1

unread,
Nov 10, 2003, 10:02:51 PM11/10/03
to
<< I got something like that. A Panasonic RF-B300....but no analog dial. >>

Nice knob! And a real meter, too.

Maybe I should start going to garage sales, but not in my redneck town. <G>

99% of the time, I use my DX392 on a regulated power supply. I may see if I can
make that dial light turn on full time. Then I can see the signal strength LCD
bar.

Bill, K5BY

Bob

unread,
Nov 10, 2003, 11:03:47 PM11/10/03
to
I have been watching the radios coming out of China and hoping that
they would come up with a pure analog rxr with a digital read out.
They did with the Grundig 350. I like this radio but it is not in
the same league as my beloved Panasonic RF 2900. That radio and the
others in the series (4800, 4900) had full analog dials with a small
digital frequency read out. The 2900 was an oversized portable with
super audio quality , great for MW DX, good for SWL put poor for SSB.
Still, of all the radios I have had, the 2900 remains my favorite.
Perhaps as the Chinese continue their incredibly rapid advancement
we will see an analog table top with stunningly good audio, little or
no background noise, flywheel tuning, BFO, amazing noise blanker,
analog "S" meter, bass and treble controls, RF gain and a dial with a
cool amber backlight. All for only $200.
Bob

starman

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 12:56:01 AM11/11/03
to
WShoots1 wrote:
>
> Please refresh my memory, Dave OM. Since 1945, I've worked on many things,
> military and civilian, made all over the world, and I don't recall any. I'm not
> referring to features like that of the Collins R390, which is just a mechanical
> version of the Grundigs. I'm looking for a real analog dial and real analog
> tuning, but with a digital readout a la the Grundigs.

Panasonic RF- 2600, 2800, 2900, 4800, 4900

Sony ICF- 6500W, 6800W CRF-1, 320A, 330K

William Mutch

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 12:05:20 PM11/11/03
to
In article <Xns942DD578A2F67...@216.168.3.44>,
inv...@invalid.com says...

"snip"

> The arbitrary sacrifice of Analog Displays by the younger generations is
> truly a sad thing. I have seen teenagers unable to tell the time on an
> analog clock.
>
> Clock trivia, notice the display on clocks that use Roman numerals. It
> goes I, II, III, IIII, IV, V, VI, VII, IX, X, XI, XII. Standard Roman
> numerals denote IIII as IV. The Non-Standard application above is used to
> keep symmetry in the display, keeping the character use in units of 4. (4
> all Is, 4 with Vs, 4 with Xs) Not all clock with Roman numerals use this
> system, but the use is widespread..
>
> We do not have digital minds, and digital electronics are not necessarily

> bringing the bliss to society that the modern public has been programmed...

Where I work there is a clock who'se face has been altered to
read:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C

Mark Keith

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 12:48:35 PM11/11/03
to
wsho...@aol.com (WShoots1) wrote in message news:<20031110004401...@mb-m15.aol.com>...

My Kenwood TS-830 is one such animal. Has both a lit analog, and
digital readout. And, the readout on the radio itself is a true freq
counter, and always reads correctly. Most newer radios, the counter
can read anything...Accuracy depends on the alignment. The external
VFO-230 has only digital readout. Being my main readout is true, I can
use it to set the external VFO...:) Both should track identically
when operating normal. But the 830 is a ham rig. Not good for a
SWL...:( I have seen SWL radios with both though. Seems Yaesu made
one...Maybe kenwood also... MK

Mark S. Holden

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 1:27:03 PM11/11/03
to
Soliloquy wrote:
>
> Clock trivia, notice the display on clocks that use Roman numerals. It
> goes I, II, III, IIII, IV, V, VI, VII, IX, X, XI, XII. Standard Roman
> numerals denote IIII as IV. The Non-Standard application above is used to
> keep symmetry in the display, keeping the character use in units of 4. (4
> all Is, 4 with Vs, 4 with Xs) Not all clock with Roman numerals use this
> system, but the use is widespread..
>

I've never seen a clock face with IIII AND IV on it.

Diverd4777

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 9:25:24 PM11/11/03
to
In article <MPG.1a1ae0d72...@newsstand.cit.cornell.edu>, William
Mutch <wc...@NOSPAM.cornell.edu> writes:

>
> Where I work there is a clock who'se face has been altered to
>read:
>1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C
>
>

Nice !!!
:)


Soliloquy

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 9:41:29 PM11/11/03
to
William Mutch <wc...@NOSPAM.cornell.edu> wrote in
news:MPG.1a1ae0d72...@newsstand.cit.cornell.edu:

We have PLCs at work, Allen Bradley, and they use Octal for the numbering
system. For the longest time, I wondered why the electronics department
have the schematics hand scribbled "actual slot 8" for the slot that the
schematic has labeled as having an address of 10. It's quite easy using
the octal addresses.

Fortunately we don't do any programming, so all we need to do is to find
the correct input/output and look for voltages and logic states.

Now Hex, I think that would make things a little harder for me to
understand. But I like the clock idea, that would be a great conversation
piece.

Regards

> In article <Xns942DD578A2F67...@216.168.3.44>,
> inv...@invalid.com says...
>
> "snip"
>
>> The arbitrary sacrifice of Analog Displays by the younger generations
>> is truly a sad thing. I have seen teenagers unable to tell the time
>> on an analog clock.

>> We do not have digital minds, and digital electronics are not

Soliloquy

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 9:45:48 PM11/11/03
to
"Mark S. Holden" <ma...@bmas.org> wrote in
news:3FB129F7...@bmas.org:

Am I missing something? I notice that you have capitalized "AND" in the
sentence excerpt "IIII AND IV on it."

I've never seen a clock with both on it either. But the IIII or the IV are
common Roman numeral markings on clocks.

Regards.

WShoots1

unread,
Nov 11, 2003, 10:19:10 PM11/11/03