En Route's tents and trees puzzles

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Kristin McConaughey

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Jul 31, 2003, 2:29:05 PM7/31/03
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Air Canada's inflight magazine "En Route" has a neat puzzle type that kept
me busy for a little while on a recent flight. In a square grid, maybe
12x12 or so, a certain number of trees are placed in cells. You then have
to attach a tent to each tree, in a cell neighbouring it horizontally or
vertically, such that no two tents neighbour one another (diagonal
neighbours are also disallowed). Numbers beside and below the grid tell
you how many tents should appear in each row and column. It was a fun
puzzle, and I'd like to find some more.

En Route doesn't put their puzzle page on the web. Googling +tents +trees
+puzzle doesn't turn up anything, and I wonder whether this is a known
type of puzzle that usually features other objects I could search for
(i.e. En Route's puzzle editor changed it to trees and tents). Does this
ring a bell with anyone? Has anyone got a recent issue of En Route they
can copy a puzzle from and post it, as an example to others?

Kristin

Dave Langers

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Aug 2, 2003, 11:09:22 AM8/2/03
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In Holland we have (or at least had) monthly editions in which I have
seen such puzzles. A personal webpage in Dutch containing a similar
puzzle is
http://members.lycos.nl/puzzel/logica.html#Puzzel3
I suggest you mail the author of this page for more information on this
type of puzzle.

All the way at the bottom of the aforementioned page you'll find a
diagram, with the following text (translated):

<START TRANSLATION>

House-Tree-Animal
In the diagram, 16 connected triplets have to be drawn. A triplet
consists of a house, a tree and an animal, in which the tree always is
at the centre. Similar symbols can never be found in adjacent squares,
not even diagonally. The three symbols can be placed horizontally,
vertically, or 'cornerwise', but not diagonally. The digits on the right
and bottom indicate the number of symbols in the respective row or column.
<DIAGRAM: http://members.lycos.nl/puzzel/hbb.gif >
If you think you have solved a puzzle, mail it to me:
kareng...@dolfijn.nl. Make a picture of your solution (e.g. jpg) to
send it in few bytes and with a good result.

<END TRANSLATION>

Kristin McConaughey

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Aug 3, 2003, 11:41:37 AM8/3/03
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Dave Langers <d.langers.w...@wxs.nl> wrote:

> In Holland we have (or at least had) monthly editions in which I have
> seen such puzzles. A personal webpage in Dutch containing a similar
> puzzle is
> http://members.lycos.nl/puzzel/logica.html#Puzzel3

Thanks! That is just what I was looking for.

> House-Tree-Animal

or Huisje-boomje-beestje! "Beestje" is great - makes you think of
beasties. Dutch is really fun to read when you know German and English. Is
the "-je" at the end of each word same as German "-chen", a diminutive?
"Boomje" sounds like "baumchen".

K

David Brain

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Aug 4, 2003, 10:51:44 AM8/4/03
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On 3 Aug 2003 15:41:37 GMT, Kristin McConaughey <k...@pas-de-spam.com>
wrote:

>Dutch is really fun to read when you know German and English

I saw an introductory German-language textbook (for English speakers)
which started by printing the weather forecast in Dutch.
It was a rather clever technique for relaxing the nervous.

--
David Brain
London, UK

Dave Langers

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Aug 5, 2003, 7:17:10 AM8/5/03
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>>House-Tree-Animal

You're right, Kristin (is that a Scandinavian name BTW?), it is a
diminutive. "-je" is the basic form, but depending on the last letter of
the word sometimes "-tje", "-pje" or "-etje" has to be added. Like the
tree: 'boom'-'boomPje' (instead of 'boomje').
And "beest" could indeed be translated to "beast", although I think that
"beast" might have a bit of a negative connotation to it, whereas
"beest" doesn't.

Some more news: I did find a tree+tent problem in a recent edition of a
puzzle magazine, so they still exist and are reasonably popular. If you
don't mind the language-difference, you might want to take a peek into
one of the magazines in the category "logische puzzels" on
http://www.abonnee.nu/index_html?titelid=28
(look for "breinbrekers"="brainbashers" and "logimix")
Or on
http://www.denksport.nl/denkshop/puzzel.php?959766020
(look for Logi-Varia)

I have the impression that logic puzzles seem to be slightly more
popular in the Dutch speaking community (including Belgium). For
instance, whole separate editions are devoted to a puzzle type called
"Logikwiz" or "Logigram", whereas I haven't been able to find any such
diagrams on the internet in other languages. See for example my own site
http://home.planet.nl/~d.langers/home.html?3gB
Is this impression correct, or have I just not been able to find the
right sites?

Kristin McConaughey

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Aug 7, 2003, 1:11:13 PM8/7/03
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Dave Langers <d.la...@wxs.nl> wrote:

> You're right, Kristin (is that a Scandinavian name BTW?),

Yes, though I just searched the directory at my university in North
America and found such a variety of surnames for people called 'Kristin',
that I guess it's a global name now. I was about to cut-and-paste the list
when I realised I'm probably not supposed to, though it seems harmless
enough.

No prizes for guessing what part of the world "McConaughey" is from.


> Some more news: I did find a tree+tent problem in a recent edition of a
> puzzle magazine, so they still exist and are reasonably popular.

Thanks! I have also made contact with someone whose father works for Air
Canada and has a stack of back issues of En Route with the puzzles, so I
think I'll take one or two along each time I travel from now.

K

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