ANSWER TO THE...GRY PUZZLE?

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bob

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Jun 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/21/96
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I'VE READ THE PUZZLE A FEW TIMES, AND TO ME IT SEEMS LIKE A PLAY
ON WORDS.

The original wording is as follows:
>
> "Here's one for you. Are you ready? There are three words in the
> English language that end in "gry". One is angry and one of them is
> hungry. What is the third word? Everone uses this word everyday.
> Everyone knows what it means and what it stands for, and if you've
> listened very carefully, i've already told you the third word."
>

I TOOK THIS EXCERPT FROM THE HEADERS .
IF YOU READ THE 3RD LINE DOWN, THEY'RE NOT ASKING YOU "WHAT IS THE
THIRD WORD?" THEY'RE TELLING YOU ****W H A T***** IS THE THIRD WORD.

IS ANYBODY FOLLOWING ME ON THIS?
THAT'S WHY AT THE END, IT SAY'S " IF YOU'VE LISTENED CAREFULLY,
I'VE ALREADY TOLD YOU THE THIED WORD.

LMK WHAT YOU THINK
BOB
em...@prolog.net


S. Macaw

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Jun 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/22/96
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em...@postoffice.ptd.net (bob) wrote:
(a theory about the "gry" puzzle)

Here's my theory:

It's meant to be a verbal puzzle, not written. You speak the puzzle
something like this:

"There are three words in English that end in 'gree'. The first two are
'angry' and 'hungry', and if you've listened close, you'll agree that I've
already told you the third one."

The object is to make the listener think about the letters g-r-y instead of
the sound "gree", and of course, the puzzle therefore cannot be presented
properly in print.

At least that's my theory.


Mike
--
Visit Strawberry Macaw's Puzzle Page at http://pobox.com/~puzzles

Stephen H. Landrum

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Jun 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/24/96
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S. Macaw wrote:
>
> em...@postoffice.ptd.net (bob) wrote:
> (a theory about the "gry" puzzle)
>
> Here's my theory:
>
> It's meant to be a verbal puzzle, not written. You speak the puzzle
> something like this:
>
> "There are three words in English that end in 'gree'. The first two are
> 'angry' and 'hungry', and if you've listened close, you'll agree that I've
> already told you the third one."
>
> The object is to make the listener think about the letters g-r-y instead of
> the sound "gree", and of course, the puzzle therefore cannot be presented
> properly in print.
>
> At least that's my theory.

And to what degree do you think people would agree with it?

--
Stephen H. Landrum voice: (415)261-2626 email: slan...@3do.com
3D graphics programmer, console products division
For general 3DO questions email customer...@3do.com

S. Macaw

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Jun 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/25/96
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"Stephen H. Landrum" <slan...@3do.com> wrote:
>And to what degree do you think people would agree with it?

Hmmm... there's also "pedigree". That shoots down that theory!

Dean Edmonds

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Jul 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/9/96
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In article <4qn407$i...@dfw-ixnews6.ix.netcom.com>,

S. Macaw <sma...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>"Stephen H. Landrum" <slan...@3do.com> wrote:
>>And to what degree do you think people would agree with it?
>
>Hmmm... there's also "pedigree". That shoots down that theory!

Not really. As stated, the puzzle does not say that there are _only_ three
such words, it simply says that there are three. Which is correct for any
number > 2.
=============================================================================
- deane | Heard in O'Neill's, home of the PugBurger:
| "You folks are as busy as a horse's tail during fly season!"

CRC Student #3

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Jul 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/10/96
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