Tadpoles & algae

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Red

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Aug 12, 2012, 11:18:56 PM8/12/12
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I have a 400 gal 'pond' for a waterhole for the critters on my
property. I can't keep the damn frogs from fornicating in it and
loading the pond with hundreds of tadpoles. With them comes nasty
pond scum (suspended algae). Anyone have an idea on how to control
the frogs and still have the water safe to drink for the animals,
dogs, & bees?

Pond is lined, with sand covering the liner to protect it from deer
hooves. No electricity nearby for an aerator. Bleaching, draining, &
refilling only gives a temporary fix. I'm suspecting frog slime
holding the eggs until they hatch is the likely cause.

JB

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Aug 14, 2012, 6:35:59 PM8/14/12
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On 8/12/2012 10:18 PM, Red wrote:
> I have a 400 gal 'pond' for a waterhole for the critters on my
> property. I can't keep the damn frogs from fornicating in it and
> loading the pond with hundreds of tadpoles. With them comes nasty
> pond scum (suspended algae). Anyone have an idea on how to control
> the frogs and still have the water safe to drink for the animals,
> dogs,& bees?
>
> Pond is lined, with sand covering the liner to protect it from deer
> hooves. No electricity nearby for an aerator. Bleaching, draining,&
> refilling only gives a temporary fix. I'm suspecting frog slime
> holding the eggs until they hatch is the likely cause.
>
Well, a "waterhole" will eventually stagnant it left alone. There are
some solar powered pumps out there you could try and rig up some simple
form of filtration. Seems to me that if the waterhole is close enough to
a water hose then it's within reach of an extension cord. I'm just
saying........

JB

Phyllis and Jim

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Aug 15, 2012, 9:20:57 PM8/15/12
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The algae will eventually use up the nutrients, unless you have more added by the stock. Have you though of any floating plants? They would grab nutrients better than the algae yet they would not prevent your aminals from drinking.

Red

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Aug 17, 2012, 9:17:41 AM8/17/12
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On Aug 14, 5:35 pm, JB <jrbnos...@ipa.net> wrote:

>
> Well, a "waterhole" will eventually stagnant it left alone. There are
> some solar powered pumps out there you could try and rig up some simple
> form of filtration.

I tried one of the floating ones from Harbor Freight and it was
worthless. Water leaked into the solar cell compartment within a week
or so.

>Seems to me that if the waterhole is close enough to
> a water hose then it's within reach of an extension cord. I'm just
> saying........
>
I didn't say anything about a water hose. I haul water to the pond in
5 gal buckets, 8 per trip, in a lawn cart. Just saying...

Red

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Aug 17, 2012, 9:17:48 AM8/17/12
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That was on my "possibility" list. Would the plants by themselves be
any benefit without having moving water? What type would you
recommend for a trial? The most common water plant in this area are
water lillies but they have very large leaves - or is that what I need?

Red

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Aug 17, 2012, 9:17:51 AM8/17/12
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Anyone have any experience with a product like this? www.OrganicPond.Com/M
uck-Reducer
If I understand their sales pitch it reduces the muck, which reduces
the nutrients, which reduces the algae. Sounds a whole lot like using
bacteria in a septic tank to keep the system alive.

dr-...@wi.rr.com

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Aug 18, 2012, 12:39:32 PM8/18/12
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You need a solar powered battery. Plug a on at dusk, off at dawn so it charges up
during the day and runs at night. Plug an air pump into that. Small air pumps dont
use much electricity. OR, Amazon has a solar powered air pump (motor is outside the
pond) that has good ratings "Smart Solar 21801R01 Solar Oxygenator Air Pump and
Diffuser"

Ingrid
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan
on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago

~ jan

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Aug 19, 2012, 7:56:17 PM8/19/12
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The bacteria for septic tanks is anaerobic (not requiring oxygen) I
believe, and probably not that good... but if you're not worried about
aquatic life.... maybe okay.

Otherwise, if you want a bacteria/enzyme product I use BZT from
http://www.united-tech.com/products/products/kp.html (you have to click on
add to cart, then you'll see the price for 1/2 lb. It goes a long way, has
a long shelf life if kept inside protected from too cold too hot
conditions. It works best though in aerobic conditions.

Seems cows (assuming that's what you mean by stock animals) would eat any
aquatic plants?

Feel for you having to cart water. Had to do that to a stock tank in
winter, not fun at all. ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us

JB

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Aug 21, 2012, 6:31:25 PM8/21/12
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It doesn't sound like you have the room for water lilies. Do you have
access to Water Lettuce? That's a good grower.

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