taking budgies outdoors ???

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Wolfgang Koehler

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Jul 28, 1992, 9:38:21 AM7/28/92
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Maybe this is a stupid question.

I wonder if it is possible to take our budgie outdoors on my sholder.
I think it is possible for bigger parakeets, why not for budgies.

She is very tame and immediatly comes on my sholder, when I call her.

Of course, I would not take any risk to let her fly away...

wolf

--
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... always look on the bright side of life ... (Monty Python)
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Wolfgang Koehler wo...@first.gmd.de

GMD - FIRST an der TU Berlin German National Research Centre
for Computer Science
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Theresa Vaughan

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Jul 28, 1992, 11:32:07 AM7/28/92
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In article <21...@bigfoot.first.gmd.de> wo...@prosun.first.gmd.de (Wolfgang Koehler) writes:
>Maybe this is a stupid question.
>
>I wonder if it is possible to take our budgie outdoors on my sholder.
>I think it is possible for bigger parakeets, why not for budgies.
>
>She is very tame and immediatly comes on my sholder, when I call her.
>
>Of course, I would not take any risk to let her fly away...
>
>wolf
>

DON'T DO IT!

Birds that are perfectly content to sit on your shoulder in the
house will either:

1) Completely forget you exist once exposed to the wonders of
the great outdoors, and fly away.

or

2) Be completely frightened by the wonders of the great outdoors,
get scared, and fly away.

Generally people who take larger birds outdoors on their shoulders
have clipped their wings. I am not sure if clipping the wings on
a parakeet is advisable, since many small birds need use of their
wings for sufficient exercise. I don't think it's worth the risk.

(by the way, I think you are the person I offered to send cockteil/
cockatoo pictures to- I am going to send you this months issue
of a great bird magazine called BirdTalk, as soon as I am done
with it. It will have the pictures you want, and lots of other
great things besides...)

-Theresa

Ruth D Miller

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Jul 28, 1992, 12:02:23 PM7/28/92
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In article <21...@bigfoot.first.gmd.de> wo...@prosun.first.gmd.de (Wolfgang Koehler) writes:
>Maybe this is a stupid question.
>
>I wonder if it is possible to take our budgie outdoors on my sholder.
>I think it is possible for bigger parakeets, why not for budgies.
>
>She is very tame and immediatly comes on my sholder, when I call her.
>
>Of course, I would not take any risk to let her fly away...
>
Not a stupid question at all! I didn't know 'til we found a good bird vet that
birds need sunlight, like humans do, to make vitamins and in their case
absorb calcium. The frequencies they need (UV) are filtered by glass and
plastic, so all birds should go outside when possible. (IF not possible
a full-spectrum light is a good investment). BUT--if your bird is not
clipped and you take her outside free (no cage) you ask for trouble. Outside
is a new, strange place, nothing looks familiar--if the bird is frightened
and takes off you likely won't see her again. If you don't want to clip
her wings I'd suggest you take her outside in a cage--you can both get a
suntan together!

Note for caretakers of larger parrots--I've been to a place called Rode,
in southwest England, where there is a large bird garden. The macaws in this
garden are allowed to roam free, all are flighted. The caretakers say that
it takes some time for the birds to learn where home is, and not all of them
do (some must be kept caged) but those that do will even come home when
scared off the property by loud airplanes or such. _And_, these birds live
outside all winter! ('Course, it doesn't snow in southern England, but there
are a few nights below freezing.) The ROde people don't do this with other
species, though.

Ruth

Laurie Bechtler

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Jul 28, 1992, 5:09:49 PM7/28/92
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In article <21...@bigfoot.first.gmd.de>, wo...@prosun.first.gmd.de (Wolfgang Koehler) writes...

>Maybe this is a stupid question.
>
>I wonder if it is possible to take our budgie outdoors on my sholder.
>I think it is possible for bigger parakeets, why not for budgies.
>
>She is very tame and immediatly comes on my sholder, when I call her.
>
>Of course, I would not take any risk to let her fly away...
>
>wolf
>

Well, if the wings are clipped, it's possible, but BE CAREFUL! When I
first got Mickey, his wings were clipped as usual for taming a new/baby
bird. He loved to sit on my shoulder and I would sit outside on my deck
with him (it was summer). But as his feathers slowly grew, he could
glide farther and farther from my shoulder. It wasn't a problem because
once on the ground he couldn't get aloft again, and I could go get him.
It was a no-4-legged-pets apartment complex, so there were no cats around.

But what made me end our outside sojourns was the time he "flew"/glided
some 75 feet from my shoulder and landed in the parking lot. From out
of nowhere swooped down a magpie (this was in Colorado Springs) -- they
are enormous birds! I ran out to the birds and scared off the magpie.
Mickey was terrified, and lost a few feathers, but wasn't bleeding. I
was lucky, since in that brief time the magpie could have easily killed
him.

Same problem could occur if there are cats around. People just aren't
fast enough to beat a cat or predatory bird to their intended prey.

If you keep the wings clipped short, so that the bird knows he can't
even glide anywhere, and will cling for dear life to your shoulder, it
would probably be safer. More enjoyable for the bird? Hard to say.

Laurie

Kent A. Watsen

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Jul 28, 1992, 11:23:07 PM7/28/92
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First of all, thanks to everybody who responded to my previous
post. After all the concern expressed, I went to the bookstore on my
lunch break and read about everything there is too know about budgies.
I knew that I had a serious problem so I took him to the vet.

The vet advertised bird-care so I felt confident that he would
be able to help us out. As it turns out, my bird is suffering from
a combination of symptoms. The most serious of which is the infection
in his nose which clogged his left cere. This is cured by first using a
pin to pop any dried puss, then appyling a drop of Gentocin Opth to each
nostrail twice a day; also I must crush 1/2 pill of Baytril and add to
1/2 cc juice and administer 1/4 cc twice daily. The second most serious
situation is the messy anal area -- actually just the result of dirareha
(sp?), this also caused the green beak as he was trying to clean himself
-- which is a common result of moving a bird to a new enviroment. A good
cleaning took care of this. In addition to medication, he is to rest in
his cage for awhile (boohoo) until better.

Hopefully he will be up and flying in a week! :)

Diana Bray

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Jul 29, 1992, 11:42:04 AM7/29/92
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Talking of birds being allowed to roam free (eg the macaws at Rode in the
UK), I'm sure I've heard of homing budgies. A bit like homing pidgeons,
but budgies.

Anyone else heard of this?

Diana Bray.

Ken Dowzycki

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Jul 28, 1992, 10:51:46 AM7/28/92
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wo...@prosun.first.gmd.de (Wolfgang Koehler) writes:


>Maybe this is a stupid question.

>I wonder if it is possible to take our budgie outdoors on my sholder.
>I think it is possible for bigger parakeets, why not for budgies.

>She is very tame and immediatly comes on my sholder, when I call her.

>Of course, I would not take any risk to let her fly away...


Don't do it. Curiosity of the other wild birds will make her
take flight. You may never see her again, especially if she decides
to try and follow one of the other birds which happens to fly by.
The risk is too great!

ejoyst...@gmail.com

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Aug 8, 2020, 7:54:01 AM8/8/20
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Yes, I heard the other day Raoul Dahl had a large aviary and all his Budgies flew often as flock around the local village. My son had seen them ..just like homing pigeons!
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