Budgie never moves from its spot?

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Brian Kendig

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Dec 27, 1994, 6:13:35 PM12/27/94
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While friends of mine are away for holiday vacation, I'm taking care of
their pretty little blue-and-white budgie. She is about seven or eight
years old, I'm told. My friends brought her in her cage, with food and
instructions on how to refill her water and so forth.

Now, the odd thing which is prompting me to post here is that the budgie
never moves. No, it's not a dead parrot, because once I saw it preening
a little bit, but all day long, every day, the bird sits on a little
bitty seed dish beside a little bitty mirror at the top of her cage, and
she doesn't move nor make any sound. She's awake, and she quivers a
little bit sometimes, but she looks like she's waiting quietly for
something that never happens. Attempts to offer her a little cup of
seeds were completely ignored until the cup was right in front of her
beak, at which time she gave it a sharp meaningful bite and looked
distressed for a moment, then continued to ignore it. I've never seen
her go for her water, either. She never changes the direction she's
facing nor turns her head, either, although she does blink occasionally.

This has been going on for the past six days. Since the bird doesn't
appear to be deathly ill or anything, I'll assume she knows what she's
doing, and since her owners will be back for her in two or three days,
I'm not very worried. But I am curious -- what's the matter with this
bird? Do budgies get so traumatized by having their cage moved to
another house that they go into a stupor?

--
_/_/_/ Be insatiably curious. Je ne suis fait comme aucun
/_/_/ Ask "why" a lot. de ceux que j'ai vus; j'ose croire
_/_/ n'etre fait comme aucun de ceux qui existent.
/ Brian Kendig Si je ne vaux pas mieux, au moins je suis autre.
/ bske...@netcom.com -- Rousseau
ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/bs/bskendig/home.html

Elizabeth Cook

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Dec 28, 1994, 10:16:53 AM12/28/94
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In article <bskendigD...@netcom.com> bske...@netcom.com (Brian Kendig) writes:
>Newsgroups: rec.pets.birds
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>From: bske...@netcom.com (Brian Kendig)
>Subject: Budgie never moves from its spot?
>Message-ID: <bskendigD...@netcom.com>
>Organization: Starfleet Headquarters: San Francisco
>Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 23:13:35 GMT
>Lines: 30

Are you saying that this bird hasn't eaten anything in six days?

There might be something in the room or close to the birds cage that is
frightening it. Any large clocks or dark objects. Telephones? Snakey looking
cords? Why not try moving the cage to a more secure spot like the corner of a
room. Or cover two sides of the cage to provide security. Where the heck are
the owners? When are they coming back? Can you call them for advice?

Ellen I. Paul

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Dec 28, 1994, 5:28:00 PM12/28/94
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Go for the obvious. Get rid of the mirror.

Ellen from Maryland

rex

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Dec 29, 1994, 5:36:48 PM12/29/94
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In article <3dsopg$r...@cville-srv.wam.umd.edu>,

too...@wam.umd.edu (Ellen I. Paul) wrote:
> Go for the obvious. Get rid of the mirror.

Why would you want to add the stress of losing the "mirror buddy" to the
stress of losing home and flock (the budgie has no way of knowing the
owners will return)? IMO, removing the mirror is not at all in the
bird's best interest, and could add enough stress to result in the death
of the bird via weakened immune response, then illness.
--
-rex
finger for PGP key =~. .~= rs...@netcom.com
C8 7A BC E0 F2 DC 06 09 - 88 E7 C1 DF 1A 1E 5F 8A

Jodie Pearce

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Dec 29, 1994, 11:28:38 PM12/29/94
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Brian Kendig (bske...@netcom.com) wrote:

: Now, the odd thing which is prompting me to post here is that the budgie


: never moves. No, it's not a dead parrot, because once I saw it preening
: a little bit, but all day long, every day, the bird sits on a little
: bitty seed dish beside a little bitty mirror at the top of her cage, and
: she doesn't move nor make any sound. She's awake, and she quivers a
: little bit sometimes, but she looks like she's waiting quietly for
: something that never happens. Attempts to offer her a little cup of
: seeds were completely ignored until the cup was right in front of her
: beak, at which time she gave it a sharp meaningful bite and looked
: distressed for a moment, then continued to ignore it. I've never seen
: her go for her water, either. She never changes the direction she's
: facing nor turns her head, either, although she does blink occasionally.

: This has been going on for the past six days. Since the bird doesn't
: appear to be deathly ill or anything, I'll assume she knows what she's

I am not an expert or anything, but I was taught that happy budgies
usually perch with one foot up. I have also been taught that sick birds
will clutch the perch with both feet, be quiet and fluff their feathers
out in an effort to keep warm. If they sit on the bottom they might be in
dire straits so get help quick...that's the only rule I am going by, and
like yourself, if she seems ok for six days, she's unlikely to be sick.

Perhaps she is lacking confidence in her new surroundings.
When I first brought my budgie home, he had been in a cage with lots of
other birds where they almost had to fight to get a spot on the perch.
Consequently he was used to only having enough space on the perch to take
one or two steps either way.

When I brought him home, he had a whole cage/perch to himself, yet he
didn't move off the perch for a day or two...I don't think it occured to
him that he was allowed to move all over the cage. I think they need to
have confidence in their surroundings before they take the risk of
exploring a new cage etc. Perhaps your little friend is just a little shy
or lacking confidence in the new place. Birds seem to be like
people...some people are more likely to take risks sooner and others take
a long time to get their confidence up.

Does this bird know you well? Did you visit a lot and pay attention to
her? Maybe you are unfamiliar. She might be just missing her
owners..particularly if not only the environment has changed, but there
are no familiar people around her..perhaps her little friend in the mirror
is the one constant thing at the moment to provide security.

What do other people think? I believe birds are a lot like kids, not only
do you need to provide a safe place with food and water, but they need to
feel safe and secure to really thrive.

Let usknow how you go...

Jo

Mil...@aol.com

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Dec 30, 1994, 12:27:11 PM12/30/94
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I was wondering if I'm alone on this thought or not?

I have a very loveable salmon-pink colored Moluccan cockatoo. I am starting
to get annoyed with the "does she talk?" question. I always respond yes, and
when she starts her little cooing I say "see, she's telling me she's happy."
You guessed it folks, she speaks fluent "bird." Am I missing the point? I
have nothing against the people that spend the hours getting their feathered
friends to sing, call, and bark.... I just think it's a lot of fun to figure
out what she's saying in her language. I think she talks up a storm, and it
would probably get lost in translation anyway.
I just wondered if anyone else felt the same way?

/Miles

Robert....@amail.amdahl.com

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Dec 31, 1994, 2:48:28 PM12/31/94
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There are many other methods of communciation that animals have that most
people do not begin to think about because they associate the ability
to mimic human sounds as communication. The question at hand, is because
your bird knows how to say a word, to they know what the word actually
is? There is excellent research done on the bird 'Alex', and the gorilla
'Coco'. Some people say the research is contriversial, but I believe that
actually do know what the words mean. I still remember watching the PBS
shows about Alex, but especially the one about Coco. Coco had a pet kitten
which she really cared for. Unfortunately one day the kitten was hit by a
car and killed. When the kitten was shown to Coco, she tried with the
skill of an adult human to revive the kitten. She frantically signed
to the keepers for help and assistance. She then was very depressed.
(Sorry, had to pause to clear my eyes... :( What was my point again??)

Other forms of communications do exist, such as body language, and the
animals natural vocal abilities. Many people do not take the time to
understand these subtile jestures, but you can learn a lot from them.
For example, my B&G Charles is in the living room with our babies which
are weaning (this way we can keep an eye on them), one day charles was
very upset on her perch, walking back and forth with quite a vigor.
She would go over and look at the babies, and then walk back and look
at us, in her language I interpreted it as "HAY take a look over here!!!",
and when I did, much to my dismay, I found a bird which was very fluffed
and cold. I immediately returned the bird from the weaning cage to the
brooder and all was fine. Next I gave charles one of her favorite treats
as a reward for her excellent observations.

As far as being multi-lingual, one of our baby parrotlets went to
a wonderful woman who spends 50% of her time in Germany and the rest in the
US. This bird knows how to speak in German, English (American and Brittish
styles) and a little bit of Spanish (or would that be Portugse?)

It makes me feel bad, because the bird is smarter than I am!!!!!

Robert Molenda
rw...@cso.amdahl.com

Lucy Chaplin Trumbull

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Dec 30, 1994, 5:28:08 PM12/30/94
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>I have a very loveable salmon-pink colored Moluccan cockatoo. I am
>starting to get annoyed with the "does she talk?" question. I always
>respond yes, and when she starts her little cooing I say "see, she's
>telling me she's happy."

Grizzle (ow amazon) knows how to say "hello" and that is the sum
total of her "human" linguistics skills. However, she has very
distinct personal vocabulary, in the order of:

"ooo, I'm frightened because there is a nasty thing outside/
up in the sky and it is coming to get me..."

"oi, I'm over here and you haven't been noticing me enough"

"I can see Patrick coming down the garden path"

"Yay, you're home and I'm sooo happy"

"No, I'm not terribly keen on going in the shower today"

"Leave me alone, I'm in a stroppy mood" (also used when she
thinks she can get away with doing something she isn't
supposed to and is trying to threaten us into letting her)
(doesn't work often...:-)

"is is time for dinner?"

"yes, I definitely think you're in the kitchen because you're
preparing my dinner"

"I'm thirsty" (a noise a little like gurgling water)(the
same noise she makes if she accompanies me to the bathroom,
she said, a little embarrassed)

"Isn't my voice wonderful" (not)

plus a load of whistles and clicks, chuntles, a fairly good
immitation of a "death ray" (picked up off a small key ring
with push buttons for different sounds she played with for a
while)

Lucy

Donna

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Dec 31, 1994, 10:44:39 AM12/31/94
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In article <elsieD1...@netcom.com>, el...@netcom.com (Lucy Chaplin
Trumbull) writes:

> immitation of a "death ray" (picked up off a small key ring
> with push buttons for different sounds she played with for a
> while)
>

I wonder whether this is the same sound my amazon makes ("phaserbird"), and if
so, is it like a natural noise that amazons make? I have no such keychain,
it's just something she often belts out while she's impersonating an eagle
(physically). Mine actually has quite a few words going, but some things are
always "asked for" in birdese too, like a drink, a kiss or anything I'm
having. One of the sounds I really like is kinda like "ARGH!" when she hears
sirens or the doorbell. She's currently working on her own version of "my
sweet babboo" which comes out sounding like the little old man character than
Arte Johnson did on Laugh In, but then she'll find her sweet little voice for
proclaiming "I'm a BABY bird!"

Eve Cunning

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Jan 1, 1995, 11:57:47 AM1/1/95
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Gawd, yes. You'd think that was the only purpose for having a bird. Moreover,
I think any goofball that says "Polly want a cracker" to any bird should be
stuffed in a tiny round cage with no toys and fed sunflower seed for the rest
of his/her life.

<end rant>

--Eve :o)

Joe Salemi

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Jan 1, 1995, 11:10:08 PM1/1/95
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In <L8tBvAu...@degroof.raleigh.nc.us> e...@degroof.raleigh.nc.us (Eve
Cunning) writes:

>
>Gawd, yes. You'd think that was the only purpose for having a bird.
Moreover,
>I think any goofball that says "Polly want a cracker" to any bird
should be
>stuffed in a tiny round cage with no toys and fed sunflower seed for
the rest
>of his/her life.
>


Oh goodness, yes -- our tiel Beaker started talking in the last month or
so, and we won't use that phrase at all. But I've had to stop friends
from using it; I think their assumption (not being bird people) is that
parrots "parrot," and don't know what they're saying.

Those friends should have been here last night when Beaker said (for the
first time) "where ya goin" to Nancy and I as we put on our coats to go
out for New Years Eve. We almost died laughing. He picked that phrase
up because I always say it to him when he walks down my leg to his cage
or climbs up to the armrest when he's playing on my stomach while I'm
laying on the couch watching tv.

He also asks "whatca doin" when he can see me but my back is to him, and
also asked us that about 30 times on XMas morning as we opened presents.
I'm 100% convinced he knows what he's saying.

Back to the subject of talking in general -- our budgie Mona (who'll be
a year old this month) doesn't talk at all, though she whistles pretty
good (learned them all from Beaker). She's still a little love, very
playfull, and fun to listen to as she sits there happily burbling her
little budgie chirps and noises. Talking or not, I wouldn't trade her
for the world.

Chris Clough

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Jan 2, 1995, 10:28:00 AM1/2/95
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I agree, I spend many a happy hour working out what my humans are trying to say to me.

Tufty the cockatiel


ian1ste...@gmail.com

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Jul 2, 2020, 9:02:26 PM7/2/20
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Just got a parakeet. I’m about 26 years late to this convo lmao.
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