240 Volt appliances

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Tom Marik

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Feb 15, 2003, 10:35:26 AM2/15/03
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I'm planning on a full size stacked washer and drier.

The question isn't about the social aspects of communal clothes washing.

Are most 50 amp RV sites suitable for running a 240 Volt appliance such as a
drier? The alternative is a propane fired drier. I hope to minimize propane
use for sake of convenience.

Tom

Bob Hatch

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Feb 15, 2003, 10:38:54 AM2/15/03
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"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
news:20030215103526...@mb-mm.aol.com...

Read Hagar's post on the same subject.

You will only be able to use the 240 volt appliance while plugged into 50
amp power. You will not be able to do so with *most* generators, and while
plugged into 30 amp service. I for one would not want a 240 volt appliance
in an RV.
--
http://www.bobhatch.com
Our web site about RV Stuff
A work in progress


Tom Marik

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Feb 15, 2003, 12:03:56 PM2/15/03
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<< Are most 50 amp RV sites suitable for running a 240 Volt appliance such as a
drier? >>

I expect to use full hook ups most of the time. When not on full hook ups, I
don't expect to dry clothes.

Tom


Ken Shelton

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Feb 15, 2003, 2:04:56 PM2/15/03
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The short answer to your question is Yes. 50 amp RV service is 50 amps at
240 volts if anything in your rig is wired to both hot legs (usually not).
50 amp RV service is usually best described at two 50 amp, 120 volt circuits
side-by-side in the same cable.

Many driers I've seen are optional 240 volt or 120 volt--just have to switch
some wires on the terminals inside the drier...of course they take much
longer to dry clothing, but you could use a 120 volt drier in 30 amp
campgrounds as long as you don't run any other large loads..A/C, etc.

It sounds like Hagar's problem is with the wiring inside the coach, not a
problem with the appliances...'cuz he didn't look and see (and understand)
what the coach was wired for.

Ken

"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
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Janet Wilder

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Feb 15, 2003, 8:45:13 PM2/15/03
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In article <20030215120356...@mb-fp.aol.com>,
tmari...@aol.comnojunk (Tom Marik) writes:

You expect to *always* have 50 amp hookups? You're holding out on me Tom.
You didn't tell me you hit the lottery.

50 amp sites are getting more plentiful, but the vast majority of *affordable*
(IMO under $22 per night) are 30 amp. Many public campgrounds (state and
county parks) and some private parks in Canada are 20 amps. The majority of 50
amp parks are higher priced, around $30+ per night. Even in less expensive
parks there is a surcharge for 50 amp sites. In the snowbird areas you pay
for your electricity on the meter. The parks with 50 amps are generally higher
rent.


Janet
The Road Princess
(I only edit and spell-check for profit)
fix the return address, please

Tom Marik

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Feb 15, 2003, 11:10:39 PM2/15/03
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<< Are most 50 amp RV sites suitable for running a 240 Volt appliance such as
a drier? I expect to use full hook ups most of the time. When not on full
hook ups, I don't expect to dry clothes.>>

<<You expect to *always* have 50 amp hookups? You're holding out on me Tom.
You didn't tell me you hit the lottery. >>

I'm asking a somewhat technical question about the quality of power from the 50
amp services when they are available.

Tom

Bob Hatch

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Feb 15, 2003, 11:26:52 PM2/15/03
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"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
news:20030215231039...@mb-mm.aol.com...
Tom, what more do you need to know?

Tom Marik

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Feb 16, 2003, 10:23:50 AM2/16/03
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<< Tom, what more do you need to know? >>

Are the majority (not all) of the 50 amp RV services properly wired with a
combined circuit breaker and do they provide over 210 volts across the two
legs?

Tom


Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 10:52:36 AM2/16/03
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"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
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Yes. Any 50 amp service that is wired otherwise is in violation of NEC. I
have only heard of a park being wired differently but have never seen same.

Carry a circuit tester with you and always check the 2 hots. If you don't
get 220 or something close, move on. If you *ever* pull into a park and when
testing across the hots get a zero measurement report the park to the local,
county, or state code inspectors, and refuse to plug into the system.

Tom Marik

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Feb 16, 2003, 11:28:46 AM2/16/03
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<< > Are the majority (not all) of the 50 amp RV services properly wired with a
combined circuit breaker and do they provide over 210 volts across the two
legs? >>

Bob,

Thanks, I'll test the power before I park and again after I add a six kilowatt
load for a minute.

Tom

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 11:39:08 AM2/16/03
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In article <20030215231039...@mb-mm.aol.com>,
tmari...@aol.comnojunk (Tom Marik) writes:

><<You expect to *always* have 50 amp hookups? You're holding out on me Tom.
>
>You didn't tell me you hit the lottery. >>
>
>I'm asking a somewhat technical question about the quality of power from the
>50
>amp services when they are available.

As you know I am electrically-challenged but I can tell you that we've been in
places where the voltage on the 50 amp hookup has been less than desireable.
Just because the amps are there, doesn't mean the volts are there.

Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 11:43:56 AM2/16/03
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"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
news:20030216112846...@mb-mm.aol.com...
???
What's with the 6 KW load test. Am I missing something here?

Let's take it a step further. The way I understand it code for RV park
setups allows 6 50 amp sites per 200 amp transformer. This would seem like
too many, however not every rig plugged in will pull anywhere near full
load.

Code also sets the standard feed for a 50 amp service at 9600/40 AW. This
according to a state electrical inspector from Florida. While a 50 amp
service in theory give 12,000 watts in reality the breaker in the rig should
pop before the max load is reached.

I have a lot more information here:
http://www.bobhatch.com/electricStuff/whats_it_mean.htm

Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 11:52:34 AM2/16/03
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"Tom Marik" <tmari...@aol.comnojunk> wrote in message
news:20030216112846...@mb-mm.aol.com...

>
> Thanks, I'll test the power before I park and again after I add a six
kilowatt
> load for a minute.

Just an additional FYI.....

Keep in mind that the nominal spec, as I understand it, from utilities is
ą5% of nominal. Nominal of 240VAC would be 228 to 252 VAC or 114 to 126 VAC
for each leg. NEMA standards for appliances is ą 10%. That is, the NEMA
(National Electrical Manufacturers Association) for appliances would stand
variations from 207 to 253 VAC or 103.5 to 126.5 VAC on each leg. I would
use the utility (or service) spec, of course, of ą5% for checking your site
voltage.. Anything outside that limit would not be good.

Ben


Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 11:59:13 AM2/16/03
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"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b2ofkf$1dd6v5$1...@ID-62937.news.dfncis.de...

> for each leg. NEMA standards for appliances is ą 10%. That is, the NEMA
> (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) for appliances would stand

> variations from 207 to 253 VAC .....

Whoops, typo.. Sorry.. 253 VAC, above, should read 264 VAC..

Ben


Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:12:27 PM2/16/03
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"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b2og0u$1cblm0$1...@ID-62937.news.dfncis.de...

> Whoops, typo.. Sorry.. 253 VAC, above, should read 264 VAC..

Damn.. OK, here we go again.. NO, I was wrong on the second post and right
on the first post.. 240VAC is the standard but many manufacturers use
230VAC as the center voltage as shown on the nameplate. SO, with that said,
the NEMA spec is 207 to 253 VAC for appliances.. Now I think I got that
right.. ;-) The utility spec I gave is correct, I just checked.,. Anyone
feel free to jump in if you don't think this is correct but that is how I
understand it..

Ben


Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:19:34 PM2/16/03
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"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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That's the way I understand it. Your chances of getting 253 VAC is rare, but
the systems are built to handle that much voltage.

I have a plug in volt meter in the rig so that I can keep an eye on the
voltage. I bought mine at CW:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?O2B751D73

One thing I notice is that with 30 amp service the voltage drops pretty fast
as I turn things on. With 50 amp service there is very little, if any
voltage drop.

A.J.S.

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:36:30 PM2/16/03
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"Bob Hatch" <bobh...@go.com> wrote in message
news:b2oh70$1eqnmt$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de...

I have a plug-in volt meter similar to the ones listed on your link. The
worst I received when connected to a 30 Amp plug with no load was 109 volts
which is still in spec. Just for fun I decided to briefly turn on the
Microwave.....instant brown-out. When connected to a 30 Amp circuit where
the voltage is at a more "normal" range (115 - 120 volts) I also find the
voltage *usually* drops quick with the turning on a few items.


Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:41:55 PM2/16/03
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"Bob Hatch" <bobh...@go.com> wrote in message
news:b2oh70$1eqnmt$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de...

> I have a plug in volt meter in the rig so that I can keep an eye on the


> voltage. I bought mine at CW:
> http://makeashorterlink.com/?O2B751D73

That's a pretty good price too. I carry a DMM in the RV at all times but I
think I'll buy one of those so I can check at a glance.. For 20 bucks, you
can't go wrong.. I know GB likes his Good Governor but those at a bit
pricey. I can check the freq., with my DMM if need be and already have a
plug in for checking the correct ground/neutral/hot wiring that I picked up
at Home Depo for less then 10 bucks....

Ben

Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 12:56:30 PM2/16/03
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Is that you, Andy? The one that just got Married and attended the PNWCO? You
changed your nick again...

Ben


"A.J.S." <SelzlerA@*REMOVE*.oz.net> wrote in message
news:b2oi6u$hao$0...@216.39.134.59...

A.J.S.

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Feb 16, 2003, 1:03:00 PM2/16/03
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"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b2ojcb$1dud3v$1...@ID-62937.news.dfncis.de...

> Is that you, Andy? The one that just got Married and attended the PNWCO?
You
> changed your nick again...
>
> Ben
>

Yep, it's me! I am now using a new laptop computer so everything is setup
as new. So I thought I would use my initials this time around. Been about
2 or 3 years since the change of the name anyhow. :-)


Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 1:18:40 PM2/16/03
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"A.J.S." <SelzlerA@*REMOVE*.oz.net> wrote in message
news:b2ojok$mec$0...@216.39.134.59...

>
> Yep, it's me! I am now using a new laptop computer so everything is setup
> as new. So I thought I would use my initials this time around. Been
about
> 2 or 3 years since the change of the name anyhow. :-)


Welcome back, Andy..

Hope all is well..

Ben


ww...@cwnet.com

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Feb 16, 2003, 1:32:57 PM2/16/03
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On 16 Feb 2003 17:36:30 GMT, "A.J.S." <SelzlerA@*REMOVE*.oz.net>
wrote:

--
>
>I have a plug-in volt meter similar to the ones listed on your link. The
>worst I received when connected to a 30 Amp plug with no load was 109 volts
>which is still in spec. Just for fun I decided to briefly turn on the
>Microwave.....instant brown-out. When connected to a 30 Amp circuit where
>the voltage is at a more "normal" range (115 - 120 volts) I also find the
>voltage *usually* drops quick with the turning on a few items.
>


The worst I recall was two years ago in MO where the voltage was 100
volts BEFORE anything was turned on. It dropped drastically as soon as
anything was turned on. We departed that park and spent the night
elsewhere running the generator. I can't see paying for camping when
the power is so bad you have to run the generator anyway.

When we built our coach, I installed a meter, switchable to each leg,
so that we have instant monitoring of the voltage at all times.

George

Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 1:45:32 PM2/16/03
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<ww...@cwnet.com> wrote in message
news:vvlv4vsglijdp2hrb...@4ax.com...

>
>
> The worst I recall was two years ago in MO where the voltage was 100
> volts BEFORE anything was turned on. It dropped drastically as soon as
> anything was turned on. We departed that park and spent the night
> elsewhere running the generator. I can't see paying for camping when
> the power is so bad you have to run the generator anyway.
>
> When we built our coach, I installed a meter, switchable to each leg,
> so that we have instant monitoring of the voltage at all times.
>
> George

My worst so far was a park in CA. 105 at plug in. It was late and we, could
not/did not want to, drive farther. Just watched what we used that night.

I like the idea of the switchable meter. May have to figure that one out and
install one. It would be nice to know that both legs are in balance.

Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 2:06:47 PM2/16/03
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"Bob Hatch" <bobh...@go.com> wrote in message
news:b2om86$1e1kva$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de...

> My worst so far was a park in CA. 105 at plug in. It was late and we,
could
> not/did not want to, drive farther. Just watched what we used that night.
>
> I like the idea of the switchable meter. May have to figure that one out
and
> install one. It would be nice to know that both legs are in balance.

Bob, couldn't you just buy another one of those meters and locate (or
connect) another plug that operates off the other leg? That way you'd have
the ability to look at both at a glance.

Ben


Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 2:26:28 PM2/16/03
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"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b2ong4$1f73n2$1...@ID-62937.news.dfncis.de...
That would work but is not as complicated and hard to do. :-)

It would sure be a lot easier.

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 2:42:10 PM2/16/03
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In article <b2oh70$1eqnmt$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de>, "Bob Hatch"
<bobh...@go.com> writes:

>That's the way I understand it. Your chances of getting 253 VAC is rare, but
>the systems are built to handle that much voltage.
>
>I have a plug in volt meter in the rig so that I can keep an eye on the
>voltage. I bought mine at CW:

Just to stir the pot a little-- when you are not in the rig, what keeps an eye
on the voltage?

Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 2:53:26 PM2/16/03
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"Janet Wilder" <pri...@aol.comupyours> wrote in message
news:20030216144210...@mb-cs.aol.com...
I don't care then because we don't usually use a lot of power when we are
not there. ;-)

When we are in the rig and start turning things on, like electric heater,
coffee pot, TV, electric fry pan and toaster I do like to know that we
haven't dropped the voltage to an unhealthy limit.

Tom Marik

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Feb 16, 2003, 3:06:04 PM2/16/03
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<< places where the voltage on the 50 amp hookup has been less than desireable.
>>

Janet,

I expect to endure primitive conditions occasionally. I will tough it out and
not do laundry. I understand that some places don't have digital cable!

Tom

Not Me

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Feb 16, 2003, 3:10:57 PM2/16/03
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|
| Just to stir the pot a little-- when you are not in the rig, what keeps an
eye
| on the voltage?

An electric eye!! Ducking and running....


RVnNOW

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Feb 16, 2003, 3:48:30 PM2/16/03
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In article <20030215120356...@mb-fp.aol.com>,
tmari...@aol.comnojunk (Tom Marik) writes:

>I expect to use full hook ups most of the time. When not on full hook ups, I
>don't expect to dry clothes.
>

>Tom

Full hook ups rarely means 50 amps. We have been in exactly 3 RV parks with 50
amps, in the 6 months we have been FTing.

Lon

Ron Recer

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Feb 16, 2003, 4:39:43 PM2/16/03
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>From: rvn...@aol.com (RVnNOW)
>Date: 2/16/2003 2:48 PM Central Standard Time

>Full hook ups rarely means 50 amps. We have been in exactly 3 RV parks with
>50
>amps, in the 6 months we have been FTing.
>
>Lon

I don't remember being in 3 RV parks in the last year that haven't had 50 amp
service.

Ron
Not FTing, but 206 nights RVing out of 365 isn't bad

Ben Hogland

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:53:46 PM2/16/03
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"Ron Recer" <ro...@aol.common> wrote in message
news:20030216163943...@mb-mj.aol.com...

>
> I don't remember being in 3 RV parks in the last year that haven't had 50
amp
> service.

Actually, something that surprises me is that most Washington State Parks
I've been to which have hook-ups, do have 50 amp service..

Ben


Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:54:29 PM2/16/03
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Good one!

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:54:28 PM2/16/03
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In article <20030216163943...@mb-mj.aol.com>, ro...@aol.common (Ron
Recer) writes:

>>Full hook ups rarely means 50 amps. We have been in exactly 3 RV parks with
>>50
>>amps, in the 6 months we have been FTing.
>>
>>Lon
>
>I don't remember being in 3 RV parks in the last year that haven't had 50 amp
>service.
>
>Ron
>Not FTing, but 206 nights RVing out of 365 isn't bad
>
>

Ron is obviously among the wealthy who do not mind paying $25 to $35 per night.
Those of us who are more budget minded rarely find 50 amp.

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:54:30 PM2/16/03
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In article <b2oq7g$1dhufg$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de>, "Bob Hatch"
<bobh...@go.com> writes:

>> Just to stir the pot a little-- when you are not in the rig, what keeps an
>eye
>> on the voltage?
>> Janet
>> The Road Princess

>I don't care then because we don't usually use a lot of power when we are


>not there. ;-)
>
>When we are in the rig and start turning things on, like electric heater,
>coffee pot, TV, electric fry pan and toaster I do like to know that we
>haven't dropped the voltage to an unhealthy limit.
>--

Bob, are you aware that a big drop in voltage can fry circuit boards in
appliances like the fridge. What if you left the A/C running on a hot summer
day while you and the fam took a quick dip in the pool and there was a big ol'
voltage drop? Could happen. While you were in the pool, you got a new
neighbor who was closer to the transformer and sucked up all the voltage.
Yours dropped. Fried A/C?

There is a method in this madness. Bear with me.

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:54:29 PM2/16/03
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In article <20030216154830...@mb-cg.aol.com>, rvn...@aol.com
(RVnNOW) writes:

>>I expect to use full hook ups most of the time. When not on full hook ups,
>I
>>don't expect to dry clothes.
>>
>>Tom
>
>Full hook ups rarely means 50 amps. We have been in exactly 3 RV parks with
>50
>amps, in the 6 months we have been FTing.
>

Tell him, Lon. He doesn't believe me.

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:54:30 PM2/16/03
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In article <20030216150604...@mb-bj.aol.com>,
tmari...@aol.comnojunk (Tom Marik) writes:

LOL! (if you didn't mean to be funny, blame it on the excellent margarita I am
sipping) Those who know me know that I consider not having a sewer hookup to
be "primitive". I did laundry today. We were sick with what they call "Texas
Crud" and I hadn't done wash in 2 weeks. Got it all done, including drying the
sheets and quilt on the outside clothes line (they smell wonderful) in about 2
hours. Had to do some 4-letter word stuff, too (*iron* sorry for the cussing),
Ugh! To make me feel better I mixed up a margarita. I know you didn't want
it to be in the discussion, but why the aversion to coin ops?

Ron Recer

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Feb 16, 2003, 6:59:23 PM2/16/03
to
>From: "Ben Hogland" benho...@hotmail.com
>Date: 2/16/2003 5:53 PM Central

>Actually, something that surprises me is that most Washington State Parks
>I've been to which have hook-ups, do have 50 amp service..

Last year we stayed at two state parks in Oklahoma, both had 50 amp service.
However, there are many don't have it. Although most older RV parks don't have
50 amps, most if not all of the newer ones do.

Ron

Ron

Bob Hatch

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Feb 16, 2003, 7:31:43 PM2/16/03
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"Janet Wilder" <pri...@aol.comupyours> wrote in message
news:20030216185430.03273.00000537@mb->

> There is a method in this madness. Bear with me.
>
>
>
OK, in that case I will hire a 28 year old Blonde that likes to strut her
stuff in a Bikini to be a voltage sitter.

Or, I could put one of these things in line.
http://makeashorterlink.com/?S5A526E73

I really like the Blonde idea better.

Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 8:33:46 PM2/16/03
to
In article <b2pah8$1e4s4l$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de>, "Bob Hatch"
<bobh...@go.com> writes:

>OK, in that case I will hire a 28 year old Blonde that likes to strut her
>stuff in a Bikini to be a voltage sitter.
>
>Or, I could put one of these things in line.
>http://makeashorterlink.com/?S5A526E73
>
>I really like the Blonde idea better.
>--

Shush! If Barry thought he could get a blonde in a bikini instead of the TRC
Power Line Monitor, he'd trade that piece of hardware in a NY minute (providing
that the blonde could also cook, do laundry and prepare income tax returns.
<g>)

I was trying to make a case for a power line monitor that will shut your shore
power down if the voltage drops below 104 as well as serving as a surge
protector. We've had ours for 7 years. We don't worry about low voltage when
the gizmo is plugged in. It'll shut down the power and test the line until the
voltage is acceptable.

A few months ago there was a power surge in a campground we were visiting that
fried a few rigs parked near us. We had a 30 amp extension cord plugged into
the pedestal which ran to the TRC. The 50 amp cord from the rig was plugged
into the TRC. The end of the extension cord fried and melted. The TRC was
blown and had to be sent to FL for repair, but everything in the rig was, thank
goodness, fine. TRC repaired the gizmo for free and sent it back to us. They
are a wonderful company to deal with. We got a new end for the extension cord
and it's fine now, too.

Power line monitors may seem expensive at first, but when yo compare them to
the cost of replacing TVs and other appliances, they are worth their weight in
gold.

Tom Marik

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Feb 16, 2003, 10:15:50 PM2/16/03
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<< if you didn't mean to be funny, blame it on the excellent margarita >>

Janet,

I always hope to be funny but fall flat most of the time.

<< why the aversion to coin ops? >>

I've owned a washer and drier for thirty years. I've used a credit card
laundry for the last four years and the next fifteen months. I hope to have a
trailer better than my apartment when I retire.

Tom


Janet Wilder

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Feb 16, 2003, 10:59:16 PM2/16/03
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In article <20030216221550...@mb-mm.aol.com>,
tmari...@aol.comnojunk (Tom Marik) writes:

><< why the aversion to coin ops? >>
>
>I've owned a washer and drier for thirty years. I've used a credit card
>laundry for the last four years and the next fifteen months. I hope to have
>a
>trailer better than my apartment when I retire.
>

I never heard of a "credit card laundry". Sounds suspiciously like a "money
laundry" <g> Seriously, Tom, I had my own washer and dryer for many, many
years. I made the decision to not have one in my fifth wheel when we went
fulltime. Part of the enchantment of this lifestyle is the freedom from house
chores. Even with a stacked pair which is bigger than a combo, I'd have to do
wash for the two of us twice a week. Too often for me. The coin ops in the
majority of campgrounds are clean and in good repair. I always meet
interesting people there and have often learned of interesting places to see or
good places to eat. Doing laundry, for me, is part of the RV experience as it
allows me to interect with people I wouldn't ordinarily have the opportunity to
get to know. Also, it supplies me with some good away time. Though the Prince
and I love each other very much and are good friends, living together 24/7 in
an RV requires away time. If I am not meeting new friends, I'm reading a
novel, working on a craft project or just admiring the scenery in peace and
serenity for a little while. I wouldn't trade my laundry time for an on-board
unit for all the tea in China. I also wouldn't give up the storage space,
subject myself to yet another thing that can break and/or leak, and add the
extra weight of a W/D in the fiver.

You do know that there are only two opinions on washer/dryers. There are those
who wouldn't, under any circumstances, travel without one and there are those
who, would NOT under any circumstances travel with one. There is no middle
ground. I did a survey.

Ron Recer

unread,
Feb 16, 2003, 11:11:04 PM2/16/03
to
>From: pri...@aol.comupyours (Janet Wilder)
>Date: 2/16/2003 5:54 PM Central Standard Time

>ro...@aol.common (Ron
>Recer) writes:

>>I don't remember being in 3 RV parks in the last year that haven't had 50
>amp
>>service.
>>
>>Ron
>>Not FTing, but 206 nights RVing out of 365 isn't bad

>Ron is obviously among the wealthy who do not mind paying $25 to $35 per
>night.
> Those of us who are more budget minded rarely find 50 amp.
>Janet
>The Road Princess

Actually there were 7 nights @ $25.07 (included phone at site and local ISP), 8
nights @ $27.00 and 4 nights @ $25.52. All the rest were under $25 and one
with 50 amp service was $10!

Ron

A.J.S.

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 11:35:40 AM2/17/03
to

"Ben Hogland" <benho...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:b2oklt$1e3jeo$1...@ID-62937.news.dfncis.de...

Thanks Ben....things are going pretty good. I actually arrived back during
the day of the Shuttle accident. Wow, what a way to end a great vacation.
I'm just now getting back into the thick of things...talk about hectic!!!
Hell I still have a suitcase sitting in my living area. Looking forward to
visiting with you.


RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 5:53:49 PM2/17/03
to
In article <20030216185429...@mb-mb.aol.com>,
pri...@aol.comupyours (Janet Wilder) writes:

>Tell him, Lon. He doesn't believe me.
>Janet

Sometimes people prefer to learn the hard way. Who are we to deprive them?

Lon

RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 5:53:48 PM2/17/03
to
In article <20030216231104...@mb-fm.aol.com>, ro...@aol.common (Ron
Recer) writes:

>Actually there were 7 nights @ $25.07 (included phone at site and local ISP),
>8
>nights @ $27.00 and 4 nights @ $25.52. All the rest were under $25 and one
>with 50 amp service was $10!
>
>Ron

The most expensive campsite I remember us staying in was $17. Call me cheap,
but last Monday we splurged and spent $12 at Sumter Oaks in Bushnell, then
spent $5, $5, $7.49, $6, $6, $1.50, all being at 30 amps except the
buckandahalf which was dry camping in a storage lot. (sometimes you gotta
improvise when everything around is full because of a holiday weekend)
Excluding the storage lot, all were wonderful campsites, all but Sumter Oaks on
water, with far more to offer than the most luxurious campground we have stayed
in. We have seen gators, bald eagles, several silver fox, 30 + mannatees, and
countless other wildlife.

You can have your 50 amps and the campgrounds in which you usually find it.

Lon, who wouldn't pay extra to get 50 amp service in an RV.

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 7:23:57 PM2/17/03
to
In article <20030217175348...@mb-cu.aol.com>, rvn...@aol.com
(RVnNOW) writes:

>The most expensive campsite I remember us staying in was $17. Call me cheap,
>but last Monday we splurged and spent $12 at Sumter Oaks in Bushnell, then
>spent $5, $5, $7.49, $6, $6, $1.50, all being at 30 amps except the
>buckandahalf which was dry camping in a storage lot. (sometimes you gotta
>improvise when everything around is full because of a holiday weekend)
>Excluding the storage lot, all were wonderful campsites, all but Sumter Oaks
>on
>water, with far more to offer than the most luxurious campground we have
>stayed
>in. We have seen gators, bald eagles, several silver fox, 30 + mannatees, and
>countless other wildlife.
>
>You can have your 50 amps and the campgrounds in which you usually find it.
>
>Lon, who wouldn't pay extra to get 50 amp service in an RV.
>

Way to go, Lon! That's positively heroic! I wouldn't pay extra for 50 amps
either. I wouldn't let the use of an appliance dictate where I could or
couldn't stay, either, but different strokes...

Bob Hatch

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 7:57:35 PM2/17/03
to
"Janet Wilder" <pri...@aol.comupyours> wrote in message
news:20030217192357...@mb-cc.aol.com...

Lon and I have similar rigs except for the conversion I did on mine to 50
amps. Now, I do like 50 amp when available, but it is not the determining
factor in where is stay.

Because of the power management systems in our rigs we can run both AC's on
30 amp power. The only time I've ever blown a circuit breaker on 30 amp was
when Mary had both coffee pots going, was frying eggs in the electric frying
pan, had an electric heater on and then put the bread down in the toaster.
POP, one of the branch breakers went, not the main. But, that would have
happened on 50 amp...so (shrug).

Randy and Cheyanne Gore

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 9:23:29 PM2/17/03
to

Randy and Cheyanne Gore

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 9:25:33 PM2/17/03
to
>
>
>>The most expensive campsite I remember us staying in was $17. Call me cheap,
>>but last Monday we splurged and spent $12 at Sumter Oaks in Bushnell, then
>>spent $5, $5, $7.49, $6, $6, $1.50, all being at 30 amps except the
>>buckandahalf which was dry camping in a storage lot. (sometimes you gotta
>>improvise when everything around is full because of a holiday weekend)
>>


Lon, are those prices with some sort of discount, like Good Sams? Those
are great prices. Last trip we used the Good Sams book but never found
any that cheap. the cheapest one was $12, and the rest were over $20.
Cheyanne

Ron Recer

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 9:28:40 PM2/17/03
to
>From: rvn...@aol.com (RVnNOW)
>Date: 2/17/2003 4:53 PM Central Standard Time

<snip>

>You can have your 50 amps and the campgrounds in which you usually find it.

That is why there are RV parks with so many different features. Some like/want
one thing and others another.

If it is cold and I don't have to pay the electric bill I prefer 50 amps so I
can run both stages of my heat pump and reduce propane usage to almost nothing.
I also like it when it is hot so I can run both stages of the a/c. However, I
can run it all if there is a 30 amp circuit and a 20 amp circuit, but it is a
little more trouble hooking up. Other than the second stage of the heat pump,
I can run everything off a 30 amp hookup.

Ron

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 11:11:34 PM2/17/03
to
In article <b2s0e0$1fcgsj$1...@ID-85448.news.dfncis.de>, "Bob Hatch"
<bobh...@go.com> writes:

>Because of the power management systems in our rigs we can run both AC's on
>30 amp power. The only time I've ever blown a circuit breaker on 30 amp was
>when Mary had both coffee pots going, was frying eggs in the electric frying
>pan, had an electric heater on and then put the bread down in the toaster.
>POP, one of the branch breakers went, not the main. But, that would have
>happened on 50 amp...so (shrug).
>--

My power management system is ME. I know how much stuff can be run at the same
time and what stuff it is. I know what to turn off to run something else.

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 11:11:34 PM2/17/03
to
In article <20030217212840...@mb-mb.aol.com>, ro...@aol.common (Ron
Recer) writes:

>That is why there are RV parks with so many different features. Some
>like/want
>one thing and others another.
>
>If it is cold and I don't have to pay the electric bill I prefer 50 amps so I
>can run both stages of my heat pump and reduce propane usage to almost
>nothing.
> I also like it when it is hot so I can run both stages of the a/c. However,
>I
>can run it all if there is a 30 amp circuit and a 20 amp circuit, but it is a
>little more trouble hooking up. Other than the second stage of the heat
>pump,
>I can run everything off a 30 amp hookup.
>

I have a big A/C that is also a heat pump. It does a wonderful job
cooling/heating my 40 foot rig on 30 amp. Most of the credit probably goes to
Newmar who does such a great job in insulating and their central air ducting is
awesome to experience. The unit is towards the back of the fiver and the
bedroom in the front is usually too cold! I had 2 A/C units in my first fiver
(38') and even when we had 50 amp service we never ran both at the same time.
We figured why have the extra weight? It was a good decision for us.

RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 11:17:28 PM2/17/03
to
In article <20030217212840...@mb-mb.aol.com>, ro...@aol.common (Ron
Recer) writes:

>If it is cold and I don't have to pay the electric bill I prefer 50 amps so I
>can run both stages of my heat pump and reduce propane usage to almost
>nothing.
> I also like it when it is hot so I can run both stages of the a/c. However,
>I
>can run it all if there is a 30 amp circuit and a 20 amp circuit, but it is a
>little more trouble hooking up. Other than the second stage of the heat
>pump,
>I can run everything off a 30 amp hookup.
>
>Ron

Propane usage? We bought propane just south of Kansas City the second week of
October, and still had 1/3 tank in Bushnell last Monday. At the SKP park,
propane was $1.70/ gallon so we filled up. We use a Lightening Rod (from
Camper's Choice) to heat water, 2 ceramic electric heaters for heat, and the
microwave for most cooking. With the computer management system and 30 amp
service in our MH, we just don't worry about power. If both heaters, the
Lightening Rod, and the fridge are all running, I don't hesitate to fire up the
microwave. The computer keeps us from tripping a breaker. It has never
happened. Like I said, I wouldn't spend good money to have 50 amp service.

Lon

RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 17, 2003, 11:17:30 PM2/17/03
to
In article <aJg4a.545$vf5.5...@feed2.centurytel.net>, Randy and Cheyanne Gore
<alg...@centurytel.net> writes:

The two at $6, and the $7.49 were C2C. The 2 nights at $5 were in Shell Mound
County Park just outside of Cedar Key, Florida, right on the edge of the Lower
Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. This is a nice campground complete with 30
amp electric, nice clean shower building, and a boat ramp. (thanks to Mike
Hendrix for that tip-----Damn, I love this newsgroup)

Forget Good Sam discounts. Join Passport America. You can camp all over Florida
for $10 a night. I posted earlier about buying a membership through a
re-seller. We bought into a park in Crossville, Tennessee, for $299 with anual
dues frozen at $49, and an escape clause so we can get out at will. Our home
park is affiliated with both C2C and RPI, so we can belong to either or both.
In fact, they are also associated with AOR (Adventure Outdoor Resorts) so we
can join that as well, if we ever deem it wise. If you join Passport America,
tell em I sent ya. They pay a "finders fee" and I like money. <G> (just
kidding. They pay a fee if you sign up camgrounds, but not for members......to
my knowledge)

Lon

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 12:03:18 AM2/18/03
to
In article <20030217231728...@mb-mq.aol.com>, rvn...@aol.com
(RVnNOW) writes:

>Propane usage? We bought propane just south of Kansas City the second week of
>October, and still had 1/3 tank in Bushnell last Monday. At the SKP park,
>propane was $1.70/ gallon so we filled up. We use a Lightening Rod (from
>Camper's Choice) to heat water, 2 ceramic electric heaters for heat, and the
>microwave for most cooking. With the computer management system and 30 amp
>service in our MH, we just don't worry about power. If both heaters, the
>Lightening Rod, and the fridge are all running, I don't hesitate to fire up
>the
>microwave. The computer keeps us from tripping a breaker. It has never
>happened. Like I said, I wouldn't spend good money to have 50 amp service.
>
>Lon
>

Lon,
When parked in snowbird parks for long-term (monthly and longer) you usually
have to pay for electricity on the meter. Down here in The Valley that can be
anywhere from 6 cents to 17 cents a KWH, depending on the town and the
campground. Most of us down here use propane, which is cheap, instead of
electricity. We pay 12 cents a KWH where we are but we get our propane where
it only costs us $11.50 for a 40# can. Using propane saves almost $20 a month
on our electric bill and costs us one can worth per month. See what I mean.

When we are traveling and not paying for our own electricity, we run everything
on electric. Answer me something, please. Why have fifth wheels come equipped
with gas and electric water heaters since around '94 but motorhomes have to
have a hot rod installed to run off of electricity? I never understood this.

RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 9:51:24 AM2/18/03
to
In article <20030217231730...@mb-mq.aol.com>, rvn...@aol.com
(RVnNOW) writes:

>The two at $6, and the $7.49 were C2C. The 2 nights at $5 were in Shell Mound
>County Park just outside of Cedar Key, Florida, right on the edge of the
>Lower
>Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. This is a nice campground complete with 30
>amp electric, nice clean shower building, and a boat ramp. (thanks to Mike
>Hendrix for that tip-----Damn, I love this newsgroup)
>
>Forget Good Sam discounts. Join Passport America. You can camp all over
>Florida
>for $10 a night. I posted earlier about buying a membership through a
>re-seller. We bought into a park in Crossville, Tennessee, for $299 with
>anual
>dues frozen at $49, and an escape clause so we can get out at will. Our home
>park is affiliated with both C2C and RPI, so we can belong to either or both.
>In fact, they are also associated with AOR (Adventure Outdoor Resorts) so we
>can join that as well, if we ever deem it wise. If you join Passport America,
>tell em I sent ya. They pay a "finders fee" and I like money. <G> (just
>kidding. They pay a fee if you sign up camgrounds, but not for
>members......to
>my knowledge)
>
>Lon
>

I read this thread to Carolyn and she asked me why I didn't mention the 10 days
before this list. She, as usual, is right. We spent the last 7 days before this
trip in Deer Creek Resort (Davenport, FL), (regular price $40/ night), at $49
for the week. RPI. The 3 nights before that, we stayed free at the Thousand
Trails, Orlando, for listening to their sales pitch and saying NO THANK YOU.
Ten days at an average of $4.90 per night deserves to be on that list. Yes, I
know we have to factor in the cost of our memberships, but it won't take long
to get back at this rate.

I used to think I was frugal, but have decided that "cheap" really isn't an
insult.

Lon

RVnNOW

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 3:00:10 PM2/18/03
to
In article <20030218000318...@mb-cc.aol.com>,
pri...@aol.comupyours (Janet Wilder) writes:

>When we are traveling and not paying for our own electricity, we run
>everything
>on electric. Answer me something, please. Why have fifth wheels come
>equipped
>with gas and electric water heaters since around '94 but motorhomes have to
>have a hot rod installed to run off of electricity? I never understood this.
>
>Janet

Good question. Maybe we MHers haven't been smart enough to insist yet.
Another maybe might be that the gas/electric WHs use a pilot rather than
electric ignition. My Dad has the gas/electric WH in his Sunnybrook TT, and it
has a pilot he lights. I wouldn't trade even up for that system. When dry
camping, we leave the WH turned off, and fire it up just before showering or
doing dishes and such. It takes very little DC power to light the WH only twice
a day.

I get the impression, maybe a false one, that MHs are designed for more travel
than either TTs or 5-ers.

I would be interrested in hearing the opinions of others on these points. Maybe
Chris Bryant could shed a little light on the issue.

Lon

Lone Haranguer

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 5:40:23 PM2/18/03
to

Janet Wilder wrote:
>
>
> My power management system is ME. I know how much stuff can be run at the same
> time and what stuff it is. I know what to turn off to run something else.
>

Yabut, your power management system guzzles (okay sips) Margaritas.
LZ

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 10:35:04 PM2/18/03
to
In article <3E52B657...@direcway.com>, Lone Haranguer
<lin...@direcway.com> writes:

>> My power management system is ME. I know how much stuff can be run at the
>same
>> time and what stuff it is. I know what to turn off to run something else.
>>
>Yabut, your power management system guzzles (okay sips) Margaritas.
>LZ

Correct: sips! Just little, bitty, teeny, tiny sips! No diminishment of my
power management abilities. <g>

Lone Haranguer

unread,
Feb 18, 2003, 11:28:55 PM2/18/03
to

Janet Wilder wrote:
>
> In article <3E52B657...@direcway.com>, Lone Haranguer
> <lin...@direcway.com> writes:
>
> >> My power management system is ME. I know how much stuff can be run at the
> >same
> >> time and what stuff it is. I know what to turn off to run something else.
> >>
> >Yabut, your power management system guzzles (okay sips) Margaritas.
> >LZ
>
> Correct: sips! Just little, bitty, teeny, tiny sips! No diminishment of my
> power management abilities. <g>
> Janet

I suppose we'll have to take your word for it until we get the Prince
pickled on Margaritas and he spills the beans.
LZ

Janet Wilder

unread,
Feb 19, 2003, 10:11:02 AM2/19/03
to
In article <3E530807...@direcway.com>, Lone Haranguer
<lin...@direcway.com> writes:

Part of the job of power management here is to manage him. He's the one who
forgets what else is on when he has a hankering for toast. <g>

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