Todd Rundgren interview

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Jason Gross

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Jul 31, 2020, 10:28:35 PM7/31/20
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Greetings,

In the latest issue of Perfect Sound Forever <http://www.perfectsoundforever.com>, you'll find (among other things):


TODD RUNDGREN
Interview- studio wiz & torch songs
"Todd had been kind enough to revisit his glorious past, eager to rummage in the brief span of a 18 minutes interview and coming up with insightful ideas, not only about his music but also on his notoriously heartfelt comments on love, the most ancient and always recurring topic in popular music."


We're always looking for good writers and/or ideas so let us know if you have anything to share.

See you online,
Jason

Jason Gross

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Feb 2, 2021, 11:24:56 PMFeb 2
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Greetings,

In the latest issue of Perfect Sound Forever <http://www.furious.com/perfect/index0221.html>, you'll find (among other things):


MOODY BLUES
Timothy Leary's (not?) dead by David Chirko
"The Moody Blues were enamoured with Timothy Leary - advocate of psychedelic, or psychodysleptic, drugs, such as LSD, psilocybin, marijuana, and mescaline. It was November of 1969 during a love-in with the Jefferson Airplane at Elysian Park in Los Angeles which "...brought them face to face with the subject of Legend Of A Mind, when...Leary turned up with a train of followers. As the band started...the song, Leary sprang...to the stage...rattling a tambourine..." Later, they all embraced. This began a camaraderie that endured until Leary's passing."

Rink

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Feb 4, 2021, 7:38:15 PMFeb 4
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Op 3-2-2021 om 5:24 schreef Jason Gross:
Why posting in the 1970's newsgroup, when the song is from the 60's?

Jason Gross

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Jun 2, 2021, 10:17:12 PMJun 2
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Greetings,

In the latest issue of Perfect Sound Forever <http://www.furious.com/perfect/index0621.html>, you'll find (among other things):

CHRISTIAN ROCK- origins of a (hip?) style by Bob Gersztyn
"The 1960's began with a movement away from religion as college students scrawled Nietzsche's "God is Dead" quote on bathroom walls, followed by the 1966 TIME magazine cover asking the question "Is God Dead?" By the end of the decade, that question was answered with a definite "No!" Pop music radio had a string of hits talking about Jesus."


JOHN LENNON- reassessing his Yoko-less solo years by Kurt Wildermuth
"Some things never get their due. Consider John Lennon's "Aisumasen (I'm Sorry)," a track from his solo album Mind Games (1973). Some pop-rock music aficionados like to talk about "deep cuts," meaning worthy album tracks that get lost in the shuffle, and "Aisumasen" might be Lennon's deepest cut. Another hidden beauty is "Bless You," from Lennon's Walls and Bridges (1974). When was the last time you heard or heard about either of these songs?"


We also have a Spotify playlist with most of the artists above here:
<https://open.spotify.com/playlist/083TeO0jHc6IDCZg8UhRhP?si=9eeade82d8de4706>

Jason Gross

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Aug 2, 2021, 6:47:19 PMAug 2
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Greetings,

In the latest issue of Perfect Sound Forever <http://www.furious.com/perfect/index0821.html>, you'll find (among other things):

THE CARPENTERS
Karen & Richard's rock & roll past by Robin Cook
"Richard and Karen Carpenter stepped into the gulf between cool and square, mellow and edgy. At their best, they balanced these aspects superbly. During their commercial height, however, they seemed to be throwbacks to an earlier, mellower, squarer era. In the 1970s, when laid-back aesthetics and hipster cred could coexist (hello, James Taylor!), they just weren't considered acceptable to like."


RON GEESIN
Composer's early days & Floyd connection by Michael Freerix
"Ron Geesin is a composer and arranger of Dadaist surrealism, with an interest in very off-beat topics. Known significantly for writing the orchestral score for Pink Floyd's Atom Heart Mother, a project that is merely a footnote in an oeuvre of unmanageability. He released plenty of records under his own name that contain songs, song collages, and field recordings, additionally writing music for a wide array of cinematic works in film and advertisement."
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