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Two-valve trumpet??!?

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Michael Porter

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Nov 7, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/7/00
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I was in a pawn shop the other day, and came across a trumpet that
had only two valves. It was built that way, not modified or broken.
Forgive my ignorance, but what the heck is that? In all my years of
playing, I've never run across that yet. The guy behind the counter
said it was described to him as a bugle, which of course it isn't.
Does anyone have an answer, besides the Schmidt fanatic?
--
---Michael Porter (of GAMBIT)...

plunkettfam

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Nov 7, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/7/00
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It's probably a keyed bugle...

Pat

"Michael Porter" <ra3...@email.sps.mot.com> wrote in message
news:3A087C8C...@email.sps.mot.com...

Matt Carey

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Nov 7, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/7/00
to Michael Porter
Heya,

what you saw was a Bugle. Drum Corps bugles were 2 valved for a long
time.


Michael Porter wrote:
>
> I was in a pawn shop the other day, and came across a trumpet that
> had only two valves. It was built that way, not modified or broken.
> Forgive my ignorance, but what the heck is that? In all my years of
> playing, I've never run across that yet. The guy behind the counter
> said it was described to him as a bugle, which of course it isn't.
> Does anyone have an answer, besides the Schmidt fanatic?
> --
> ---Michael Porter (of GAMBIT)...

--
Matt Carey

matt....@ieee.org

Michael Porter

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Nov 7, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/7/00
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Matt Carey wrote:
>
> Heya,
>
> what you saw was a Bugle. Drum Corps bugles were 2 valved for a long
> time.

Well, I'll be darned. In all my years of playing (I'm 45), you'd think
I would have run across this at least *once*, especially since I did
the marching band bit for so long. I thought the very definition of
"bugle" started with "no valves", but I guess that was wrong.
Thanks for setting me straight.

John Kool

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Nov 7, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/7/00
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Probably a soprano bugle in G, as used by competitive drum and bugle corps
for years. (And presumably, still in use in spite of the recent DCI ruling
allowing 3 valves and different pitched instruments.)

> From: Michael Porter <ra3...@email.sps.mot.com>
> Organization: Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector
> Newsgroups: rec.music.makers.trumpet
> Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 16:05:00 -0600
> Subject: Two-valve trumpet??!?
>
> I was in a pawn shop the other day, and came across a trumpet that
> had only two valves. It was built that way, not modified or broken.
> Forgive my ignorance, but what the heck is that? In all my years of
> playing, I've never run across that yet. The guy behind the counter
> said it was described to him as a bugle, which of course it isn't.
> Does anyone have an answer, besides the Schmidt fanatic?

Padraic Brown

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Nov 8, 2000, 12:19:59 AM11/8/00
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A keyed bugle is a conical bored horn that has 6 or 7 actual keys, like
you'd find on a saxophone. They were common in the first half of the last
century, up until the 1860s or so. Very old cornets (1820s or 30s) had 2
valves; though this horn is most likely much newer and is, as mentioned
elsewhere, a bugle as played by drum and bugle corps. I think the valves
answer to valves 1 & 2 found on other brass instruments.

Padraic.

plunkettfam (plunk...@email.msn.com) wrote:
: It's probably a keyed bugle...

: Pat

: "Michael Porter" <ra3...@email.sps.mot.com> wrote in message
: news:3A087C8C...@email.sps.mot.com...

: > I was in a pawn shop the other day, and came across a trumpet that

JWarren911

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Nov 8, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/8/00
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I played 2 types in an Air Force Drum and Bugle Corps. The first had a piston
valve that was the same as a trumpet valve 1. The second valve was a rotary.
The other type of horn had 2 vertical piston valves just like a trumpet. The
play just like a trumpet, but for the same pitch, you need to hold down the
trumpet's 3d valve the whole time. Really a pretty fun horn to play above the
staff!

8va fff

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Nov 8, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/8/00
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It is a G bugle used in drum and bugle corps.

How much did they want for it? Was it silver or chrome finish? What
was the name on the bell (DEG, Getzen, Olds, Titleist).

Randy

Drum and Bugle Corps, my summer hobby.
Model Railroading, my winter hobby.

Sebastian Diel

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Nov 8, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/8/00
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Matt Carey wrote:

> Heya,
>
> what you saw was a Bugle. Drum Corps bugles were 2 valved for a long
> time.

I always thought, a bugle was a flügelhorn. Hm.
Can anyone enlighten me?

SeDi

W Souder

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Nov 10, 2000, 8:26:19 PM11/10/00
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>I always thought, a bugle was a flügelhorn. Hm.
>Can anyone enlighten me?

This is not a 'bugle' in the musicological sense of the word. What is refered
to here, is a drum and bugle corps bugle, which has 'evolved' over time from
the US military G bugle. In the early '30's, a D crook was devised, which was
replaced by a piston valve, resulting in a horn in G/D. It was during this
time that bugles in different sizes were introduced(french horn and baritone).
In the early '60's a rotary valve was added, creating a bugle in G/D/F, also
the contrabass bugle was introduced. In the late '60's the 'plumbing' was
rearranged to G/F/F#, aproximating the first two valves on a standard brass
instrument. In the mid '70's the piston/rotory arrangement was replaced by two
pistons. In '88 a third valve was added, and last year, the whole thing came
full-circle when Bb marching instruments were approved (but no sousaphones or
trombones. Long, I know, but I hope this helps.

Pax, Bill Souder l_P

Sebastian Diel

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Nov 10, 2000, 8:57:21 PM11/10/00
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W Souder wrote:

> Long, I know, but I hope this helps.

It does!
Thanks a lot for "ensmartening" me!

SeDi

W Souder

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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>
>> Long, I know, but I hope this helps.
>
>It does!
>Thanks a lot for "ensmartening" me!
>
>SeDi

One other interesting fact: the main reason for the unusual valve combination
(the G/D/F) back in the '60's was so the marching bugle would not be considered
a 'musucal instrument', and thus the arrangers of the music would not have to
make royalty payments to the original sources.

Pax, Bill Souder l_P

Scott Stephens

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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When you only have 2 valves, how do you play notes like low C#, Eb and Ab?
Or do you just not play them?

Scott Stephens

8va fff <krat...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3A096B71...@hotmail.com...

Glenn E.

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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Those are made for people who are just a cup and saucer short of a full
place setting. Like: "He was just a valve short of being a trumpet
player." lol! Glenn E.




Padraic Brown

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Nov 11, 2000, 8:49:35 PM11/11/00
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Those notes don't appear in the music as arranged for this family
of instruments.

Padraic.

Scott Stephens (scott-n...@fuse.net) wrote:
: When you only have 2 valves, how do you play notes like low C#, Eb and Ab?

: Scott Stephens

: >


W Souder

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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>When you only have 2 valves, how do you play notes like low C#, Eb and Ab?
>Or do you just not play them?

You just don't play them. I suppose that's one advantage of the horn being in
G; the music was just arranged higher on the horn.

Pax, Bill Souder l_P

Mike McCowan

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Oct 2, 2020, 5:53:30 PM10/2/20
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