Bebop heads?

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funkifized

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Oct 14, 2006, 11:21:50 PM10/14/06
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I'm working through Baker's How To Play Bebop, and have an advanced
student also checking it out. We talked about learning some Bebop
heads, as many (some here) have said that most of what should be
learned about Bebop can be found in learning Bebop heads.

Okay, so what are the best Bebop heads worth learning? Where do we see
some of these Bebop Scale phrases in heads? I'm looking through the
Real Book and not finding a lot of this. However, I'm not totally
positive about what people are considering Bebop. I've suggested to my
student some standard tunes that I know of, such as Oleo, Au Privave,
The Eternal Triangle, Ornithology, Anthropology, etc.

What's a good list of Bebop heads to learn some of these Bebop Scale
patterns? List of must-learn Bebop tunes? I don't see any of these
patterns and devices in say, Autumn Leaves or Just Friends.

Joe Montgomery

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Oct 14, 2006, 11:43:21 PM10/14/06
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> Okay, so what are the best Bebop heads worth learning?

Heads I have learned that have helped me slosh thru bebop language:

1. Hot House
2. Hallucinations
3. Confirmation
4. Dexterity
5. Moment's Notice
6. Our Delight
7. Daahoud (sp?)
8. Cheryl
9. Half Nelson
10. Quasimodo


jm

Max Leggett

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Oct 15, 2006, 12:00:57 AM10/15/06
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On 14 Oct 2006 20:21:50 -0700, "funkifized" <funki...@hotmail.com>
wrote:

Why not get the Omibook? All of Parker's heads plus a couple of
choruses of solos on each number to boot.


--------------------------------
Without music, life is a mistake.
Freidrich "Hep Daddy" Nietzsche
---------------------------------

Joey Goldstein

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Oct 15, 2006, 12:49:13 AM10/15/06
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Charlie Parker

--
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http://www.joeygoldstein.com
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tomb...@jhu.edu

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Oct 15, 2006, 1:04:23 AM10/15/06
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I'm going to be a little bit contrarian, and suggest checking out bop
heads by other guys too. Parker's stuff often has more of a long-line,
improvised feel, with not so many self-contained licks compared to a
lot of the other guys. The other guys usually just strung their hippest
licks together and called it a composition. Studying Parker will surely
get you into the bop language in a very legitimate fashion. But if you
want the cool licks in their easiest-to-digest form, try the other guys.

Tom R

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Oct 15, 2006, 2:43:10 AM10/15/06
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Yeah, like John Lewis' April in Paris ... good nuggety little motif
there.

I love Parker's blues heads though ... they really brought me to a
place where I was hearing the broader palette of tones available in
Bebop ... Cheryl remains one of my favourites, as well as Bloomdido.

Joe Montgomery

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Oct 15, 2006, 8:59:13 AM10/15/06
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OOPs...I forgot Donna Lee.

Transpose that head in all 12 keys and I think you'll have a good idea
that the Hokey Pokey is not what it's all about...bebop is!

jm

Slide

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Oct 15, 2006, 11:47:09 AM10/15/06
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Joy Spring in the real book is the bebop tune that got me started ...
and for me it's still the strongest ...

Rich D.

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Oct 15, 2006, 1:08:43 PM10/15/06
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funkifized wrote:
Where do we see
> some of these Bebop Scale phrases in heads? I'm looking through the

I am using an old book called modern Jazz. I found it used at a sale .
It has, what the book calls, over 250 progressive jazz numbers.
It looks old and may not be in print any more. if you can't find it
maybe I could email you some of them in jpeg form.

Rich D

Ps lots of parker and others

Marc Sabatella

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Oct 15, 2006, 1:10:51 PM10/15/06
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> Okay, so what are the best Bebop heads worth learning? Where do we see
> some of these Bebop Scale phrases in heads? I'm looking through the
> Real Book and not finding a lot of this.

For one thing, it's not like these guys were "using" the bebop scale in
the way we might think about it today. They were using the major and
minors scale, and tossing in some passing tones when it felt necessary.
Baker just codified this practice by putting names on particular
combinations of major and minor scales with passing tones. So one
shouldn't expect to see anything that looks quite as pat as Baker makes
it sound. Sure, beboppers used passing tones all the time, but in a way
MUCH more varied than would appear from learning a small set of fixed
"bebop scales".

Second, I think you'll find more use of this particular devices in
*solos* than in heads, simply because the heads don't tend to have quite
the same types of long streams of eighth notes in which these passing
tones are most effective. Heads are still great to learn to get a
general feel for the language in terms of phrasing and so forth, but if
you really need to see a lot of examples of people using passing tones
in the way Baker describes, look at the solos in the Omnibook (or
transcribe a few yourself). Personally, I don't feel the concept of
adding passing tones to one's lines is so hard to grasp that it really
requires examples in order to be able to do so oneself. Sure you might
come up with something slightly *different* from the ways Bird et all
used passing tones. As far as I am concerned, that's a *good* thing.

> What's a good list of Bebop heads to learn some of these Bebop Scale
> patterns? List of must-learn Bebop tunes? I don't see any of these
> patterns and devices in say, Autumn Leaves or Just Friends.

Neither of those are bebop tunes. Both are pop tunes of the era that
happened to be played by jazz musicians. You need to be looking at
tunes actually written by jazz musicians - and in particular, ones in a
bebop style. The starting place for this would be tunes you actually
have recordings of. And if you don't have any recordings of bebop, then
THAT'S the first step - you have no hope of playing in a style you don't
listen to a lot already.

That said, again, actual tunes don't tend to use the passing tones in
the particular way described by Baker as much as solos do.

---------------
Marc Sabatella
ma...@outsideshore.com

Music, art, & educational materials
Featuring "A Jazz Improvisation Primer"
http://www.outsideshore.com/


Ted Vieira

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Oct 15, 2006, 2:30:15 PM10/15/06
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On 10/14/06 8:21 PM, in article
1160882510.2...@m7g2000cwm.googlegroups.com, "funkifized"
<funki...@hotmail.com> wrote:

Anything from Parker. The Omni Book's a great source for this phrasing.

Ted Vieira

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Keith Freeman

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Oct 16, 2006, 10:38:12 AM10/16/06
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> Okay, so what are the best Bebop heads worth learning?
The ones that you have an emotional connection with!

-Keith

Portable Changes, tips etc. at http://home.wanadoo.nl/keith.freeman/
e-mail only to keith DOT freeman AT wanadoo DOT nl

Mike C.

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Oct 16, 2006, 2:32:06 PM10/16/06
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Who's the author of that book?

--
Mike C.
http://mikecrutcher.com
"A great percentage of people don't want a challenge. They want
something done to them, they don't want to participate. But there'll
always be maybe 15% that desire something more, and they'll search it
out. And maybe that's where art is."
- Bill Evans


"Rich D." <jazzs...@email.com> wrote in message
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JP

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Oct 16, 2006, 6:30:23 PM10/16/06
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To answer your question.

Scrapple
Ornithology
Donna Lee
Anthropology
Confirmation
Dexterity
Groovin High
Straight no chaser


Those are common, wll played heads of bebop. Mostly Partker. There are
many others. These will keep you busy for
some time.
A lot of them contain the language phrases that Baker talks about suitable
for using as building blocks as he describes.


btw, in Bakers book, he lists the bebop tunes to learn. It's a long list!

all the best

John


"Keith Freeman" <smtp.cablewanadoo.nl> wrote in message
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Rich D.

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Oct 16, 2006, 7:04:04 PM10/16/06
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Mike C. wrote:
> Who's the author of that book?

Hi Mike
No author
This book has no markings not even a publisher
Rich D

funkifized

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Oct 16, 2006, 11:44:41 PM10/16/06
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JP wrote:
> To answer your question.
>
> Scrapple
> Ornithology
> Donna Lee
> Anthropology
> Confirmation
> Dexterity
> Groovin High
> Straight no chaser
>
>
> Those are common, wll played heads of bebop. Mostly Partker. There are
> many others. These will keep you busy for
> some time.
> A lot of them contain the language phrases that Baker talks about suitable
> for using as building blocks as he describes.
>
>
> btw, in Bakers book, he lists the bebop tunes to learn. It's a long list!
>
> all the best
>
> John

Actually, I'm looking at the book right now, and ain't nothing showing
a list of bebop tunes to learn. Thanx for your list, though!

Rich D.

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Oct 17, 2006, 8:04:33 AM10/17/06
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> Actually, I'm looking at the book right now, and ain't nothing showing
> a list of bebop tunes to learn. Thanx for your list, though!

Do you mean bakers book ?

ray

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Oct 17, 2006, 11:14:26 AM10/17/06
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funkifized wrote:

>
>
> Actually, I'm looking at the book right now, and ain't nothing showing
> a list of bebop tunes to learn. Thanx for your list, though!
>

Baker's Bebop Volume 3 has the list of tunes based on the most common
sets of changes.

Ray

Mike C.

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Oct 17, 2006, 3:07:50 PM10/17/06
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"ray" <ray...@austin.rr.com> wrote in message
news:mr6Zg.265$xF1...@tornado.texas.rr.com...

That explains it. I only have Vol. 1 + 2.

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