I hate movie samples in industrial music

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Michael J. Salo

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Jun 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/18/97
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see subject.

It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing
old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts Robocop
or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.

So anyway, I'm wondering:

1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
industrial/electro music?

and

2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
whole concept?

I suspect front line ASSembly for #2. I won't make a guess on #1.


Michael J. Salo
sa...@andrew.cmu.edu

owen f

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Jun 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/19/97
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On Wed, 18 Jun 1997 21:39:45 -0400, "Michael J. Salo"
<fstf...@pacbell.net> wrote:

>2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
>whole concept?

Well, PWEI uses a HELL of a lot of samples.

And some of Negativland's stuff is JUST samples. I don't know -
sometimes samples can be realy good - you have to be careful with
them.

Favourite sample: The Electric Helfire Club - Mr.44 - "I like girls a
lot. I like pretty girls. I only shoot pretty girls." (don't know
where it's from...)

NP: Wipers - The Pod (What a shitty album - I boughit it because I
liked the case, and now I'm forcing myself to listen to it, to "get my
money's worth")

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Brian J Parker

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Jun 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/19/97
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In article <33A88D...@pacbell.net>,

Michael J. Salo <fstf...@pacbell.net> wrote:

>1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
>industrial/electro music?

I'm sure an old-timer will corrrect me, but I've always been under the
impression that Genesis P-Orridge had a lot to do with early sampling.

brian j parker ----------------- "The Web is basically 'text for people
black-clad cliche -------------- who can't read'"
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http://www.pitt.edu/~bjpst6 ---- --A. Eldritch

--
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(c)Flamma 1996 -----------------
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Adam K Rixey

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Jun 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/19/97
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"Michael J. Salo" <fstf...@pacbell.net> writes:
> It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing
> old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts Robocop
> or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.

Sometimes they're fun. But they do get tiring. I think the worst
sample I've heard in recent ages is in a :wumpscut: song off Bunkertor
7. I can't remember the title (haven't played it in a bit), but it's
a nice, peaceful, piano tune. Very relaxing. Then, in the middle,
for no apparent reason, there's a big demon voice saying "Tonight you
sleep in hell!", then it goes back to the piano ditty. UTTERLY ruins
what would've been a great instrumental.

> 2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
> whole concept?
>

> I suspect front line ASSembly for #2. I won't make a guess on #1.

Depends what you mean by overuse. I _despise_ voice samples
repeated ad infinitum. "Church in Hell" from Skinny Puppy's _Bites_
album springs to mind instantly as one of My Most Hated Songs Of All
Time.

On the other hand, sometimes it's fun to have "industrial sample
movie night". Legend of Hell House was actually a lot better than I
was expecting...

AkR http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/~nyarl/ die with your eyes on -LPD


<daemonus>

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Jun 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/19/97
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On Thu, 19 Jun 1997, Adam K Rixey wrote:

> Sometimes they're fun. But they do get tiring. I think the worst
> sample I've heard in recent ages is in a :wumpscut: song off Bunkertor
> 7. I can't remember the title (haven't played it in a bit), but it's
> a nice, peaceful, piano tune. Very relaxing. Then, in the middle,
> for no apparent reason, there's a big demon voice saying "Tonight you
> sleep in hell!", then it goes back to the piano ditty. UTTERLY ruins
> what would've been a great instrumental.

"Thorns"


<r.glass>
"What if I'm not lying? What if Milkman
Dan has beaten God at his own game..
"The most beautiful just imagine, if you will, what kind of
experience we can delicious suffering awaits you at the
have is the mysterious" hands of the most powerful milkman in
-Albert Einstein the universe."
-Max Cannon

NP:

daem...@asu.edu http://www.public.asu.edu/~sickman/main.htm


Serial.Port.Killer

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Jun 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/19/97
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Michael J. Salo (fstf...@pacbell.net) wrote:

: It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing


: old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts Robocop
: or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.

*shrug* To each their own. I tend to like it, although there are a
handful of films which have been sampled to death. Hellraiser,
Bladerunner and Aliens spring immediately to mind.

: 1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
: industrial/electro music?

It's been done forever. Portion Control heavily sampled from Wargames,
Puppy did it since the beginning, etc. etc.

I'm inclined to say it started with the early-eighties and
post-industrial, but I could be way off on that.

: 2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
: whole concept?

Probably Skinny Puppy, actually. At least, they were the ones who
overdid it with the horror genre. FLA probably get the prize for
overdoing it with science fiction movies.

Later...
Morgan
--
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mwo...@gladstone.uoregon.edu to describe the realistic."
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FS jake J

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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best sample I heard was a song from skinny puppy:remission - " Pornograpy
is a matter of artistic creativity " - ronald regan.
<><> Jake Jarnigon

" So I hear you're practicing the piano . What the hell are you ? SOME KIND OF FAGGOT?!?!?"
- quote said by walt disney in the biography "Walt Disney - the Dark Prince of Hollywood"
( documented by an eye-witness )


FS jake J

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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skinny puppy is the earliest group I've heard that sampled *movies*. But
I think the first sampling person was probably Peter Christopherson in not
GP in the early days of Throbbing Gristle.

Morrigu198

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Peter Christopherson, but also Christ Carter who designed most of the
equipment and created alot of the samples. but before that there were
alot of "dadaist" artists in the early 1950's electronic music scene
creating "audio collages" with found speech from television and film, so i
guess that presents an early use

-ben


BODART Olivier

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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In article <19970620032...@ladder02.news.aol.com>, fsj...@aol.com (FS jake J) writes:
|> best sample I heard was a song from skinny puppy:remission - " Pornograpy
|> is a matter of artistic creativity " - ronald regan.
|> <><> Jake Jarnigon
|>
|> " So I hear you're practicing the piano . What the hell are you ? SOME KIND OF FAGGOT?!?!?"
|> - quote said by walt disney in the biography "Walt Disney - the Dark Prince of Hollywood"
|> ( documented by an eye-witness )
|>

I also liked very much this :
"...And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger,
those who attempt to poison and destroy my brother, and you will know..."
(from Pulp fiction),
in a hard techno piece by The Horrorist aka Miro entitled Frozen.

Joff

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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On Wed, 18 Jun 1997 21:39:45 -0400, "Michael J. Salo"
<fstf...@pacbell.net> wrote:

>see subject.


>
>It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing
>old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts Robocop
>or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.
>

>So anyway, I'm wondering:
>

>1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
>industrial/electro music?
>

>and


>
>2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
>whole concept?
>

>I suspect front line ASSembly for #2. I won't make a guess on #1.
>
>

>Michael J. Salo
>sa...@andrew.cmu.edu

Well, I don't know you started it but FLA, as much as I luv 'em,
surely as hell blew it out of proportion. At least Rhys and Bill have
kept their local video stores in business quite comfortably.
By far the *worst* example of sample atrocities would be on Millenium.
I swear at least half of Falling Down is on the CD.

But still, 'We are not the same... I'm an American, you're a sick
asshole!' is a great way to start a CD.

crisp insect flavour

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Brian J Parker wrote:

> >1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
> >industrial/electro music?
>

> I'm sure an old-timer will corrrect me, but I've always been under the
> impression that Genesis P-Orridge had a lot to do with early sampling.

yes and no, throbbing gristle was certainly one of the first bands to
sample things other than instruments for live performances/records, but
that was mainly chris carter and sleazy, not gen.
but i don't think they sampled anything directly from movie dialogues;
somehow i imagine that may have been done by a "pop" band first, either
that or it was cabaret voltaire?

& as for the people who made it horribly tired, certainly fla are
partially to blame, but i didn't get tired of it until bands like
leaether strip and endless bad fla/puppy knockoffs started using like
ten retarded samples per song, and repeating them over and over...the
original poster is right in saying that it's a nauseatingly overused
practice, but that's what modern industrial music is based
on...nauseatingly overused gimmicks.

--
Here lies a youth who died of consumption:
you know why
Do not pray for him

Tom Shear

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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I think the main probelm with movie/tv/dialogue samples in music is that 9
times out of 10 the samples have nothing to do with the theme of the
song... they are just there to 'sound cool'... if used properly I think
they can actually be very effective...
--Tom
Assemblage 23
-----------------------------------------------------------
"I don't want to be some big, brown hole." - Scott Sturgis
-----------------------------------------------------------
"You must be the pot and the kettle." - Goat Boy
===========================================================
Visit the Assemblage 23 Home Page:
http://members.aol.com/tomshear/private/tomshear1.html

Francis X. Connor

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Adam K Rixey (nya...@andrew.cmu.edu) wrote:

I think the worst
: sample I've heard in recent ages is in a :wumpscut: song off Bunkertor
: 7. I can't remember the title (haven't played it in a bit), but it's
: a nice, peaceful, piano tune. Very relaxing. Then, in the middle,
: for no apparent reason, there's a big demon voice saying "Tonight you
: sleep in hell!", then it goes back to the piano ditty. UTTERLY ruins
: what would've been a great instrumental.

Congratulations. You competely missed the point of the song. Think about
the title--"Thorns"--and what it implies. Then think about why one would
want to disturb such a nice tune with such a disturbing sample. Very
clever, methinks.

In any case, I've heard that the line is not a sample at all, but Rudy's
heavily distorted voice. I'm not vouching for the veracity of that, but
some have specualted such.

And as far as band who pioneered sampling: were anyone to crawl out from
their Industrial holes, they'd realize that the band that probably has the
highest movie samples-to-notes ratio in popular music is Big Audio
Dynamite. Play _This Is Big Audio Dynamite_ and keep in mind that it
predates most second-generation industrial/sample bands. "Go ahead,
London" indeed.

Also influential: M/A/R/R/S's "Pump Up the Volume," heralded as innovative
in its time because of its reliance on samples (still a great song, BTW).

Of course, no one's mentioned Cabaret Voltaire's pioneering cut-ups. But
that's to be expected.

Later,
Fran "The 70 Billion people of Earth...where are they hiding?" Connor

--
______________________________________________________________________________
"A man, who has had no opportunity of comparing the different kinds of
beauty, is indeed totally unqualified to pronounce an opinion with regard
to any object presented to him."
--David Hume, "Of the Standard of Taste"
______________________________________________________________________________
Francis X. Connor Career English Major George Washington University

Nicole Gustas

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Francis X. Connor wrote:
>
> Congratulations. You competely missed the point of the song. Think about
> the title--"Thorns"--and what it implies. Then think about why one would
> want to disturb such a nice tune with such a disturbing sample. Very
> clever, methinks.

Go Fran! Also, the instrument in question is HARP, not piano. Geez...
IMNSHO, the sample absolutely MAKES the song.

> In any case, I've heard that the line is not a sample at all, but Rudy's
> heavily distorted voice. I'm not vouching for the veracity of that, but
> some have specualted such.

Good thing you didn't vouch for the veracity of that. Go rent
"Highlander", preferably the director's cut because it's a better film,
and watch for the great battle between the Kurgan and Ramirez. The line
is what the Kurgan says to Ramirez at the top of the staircase at the
end of the battle.

> And as far as band who pioneered sampling: were anyone to crawl out from
> their Industrial holes, they'd realize that the band that probably has the
> highest movie samples-to-notes ratio in popular music is Big Audio
> Dynamite. Play _This Is Big Audio Dynamite_ and keep in mind that it
> predates most second-generation industrial/sample bands. "Go ahead,

Hey, don't forget PWEI; hell, there are some songs on "This Is The
Day..." that are nothing BUT samples. "Defcon One", anyone?

-rednikki

Mister Sister

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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crisp insect flavour wrote:

> & as for the people who made it horribly tired, certainly fla are
> partially to blame, but i didn't get tired of it until bands like
> leaether strip and endless bad fla/puppy knockoffs started using like
> ten retarded samples per song, and repeating them over and over...the
> original poster is right in saying that it's a nauseatingly overused
> practice, but that's what modern industrial music is based
> on...nauseatingly overused gimmicks.

At least FLA doesn't repeat the same movie samples in the same song.
Even though Time Cop was a pretty silly movie, I think the samples sound
pretty cool in "Plasticity". TKK tends to repeat samples in a lot of
their songs, but I think those songs were intended to be mindless
anyway. One of my favorite samples is "And everybody thinks I'm high
and I am" from "The Devil Does Drugs". One band that really seems to be
movie sample happy is Xorcist. Their latest album, Soul Reflection, is
chock full of them. I like the album, but the samples do get redundant.

Mr. Sister

--
********************-- mrsi...@ix.netcom.com --*******************
*******-- http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Alley/4935 --*******
*-- Visit for gothic/industrial music info and recommendations, --*
******-- band links, concert ratings, and vampire poetry --********

Al Crawford

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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And lo, toms...@aol.com (Tom Shear) spake unto the masses, saying...

>
> I think the main probelm with movie/tv/dialogue samples in music is that 9
> times out of 10 the samples have nothing to do with the theme of the
> song... they are just there to 'sound cool'... if used properly I think
> they can actually be very effective...

Couldn't agree more - part of the problem though isn't just that they've got
nothing to do with the song, but that the same ones get used again and again
and again. Even if a (to pick the prime offender) Bladerunner or Aliens
sample is highly suited to the track in question, the main reaction it gets
from me is "Oh god, no, not *that* again".

The deja vu effect isn't limited to the big sampling sources too. Some Puppy
sample might be from a really obscure horror flick, but if someone then reuses
it not only does the re-user sound cliched but the Puppy track loses something
in future.

Of course, sometimes mischievous malice on the part of the artist plays a part
too - I know for a fact that New Mind/Bio-Tek projects *deliberately* use
samples that other artists have used in the past because it drives people
nuts. Oh, and because they're appropriate too, of course :-) I'd be more
concerned if I didn't know that JS9 is a BIG movie buff (his day job is ample
evidence of this) so it's not laziness, just messing with our minds.

On a related note, I don't think it's a coincidence that the stuff from
the techno/electronica sphere that appears to me most tends to be either
sample-less or uses samples minimally. Good thing really, since mainstream
dance music makes the industrial scene look positively innovative in its
choice of samples.

Al

--
Al Crawford - aw...@pobox.com
"Art/Empire/Industry"

Skarekroe

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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:skinny puppy is the earliest group I've heard that sampled *movies*. But

:I think the first sampling person was probably Peter Christopherson in
:not
:GP in the early days of Throbbing Gristle.

pink floyd had movie samples in 1979, though they were used to represent
what the character was watching on tv, not as part of the music.

sk

Ian Giesbrecht

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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> = "jesus had days like this..." - i don't remember the song; by FLA or leather strip, i think;
> = but definitly one of the coolest samples.

It's Mindphaser by FLA...Sheesh, some people!
IAN

Bradley Barkett

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Joff diarrhetically offered:
: On Wed, 18 Jun 1997 21:39:45 -0400, "Michael J. Salo"

: <fstf...@pacbell.net> wrote:
:
: >see subject.
: >
: >It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing
: >old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts Robocop
: >or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.
: >
: >So anyway, I'm wondering:
: >
: >1) who was the first band to incorporate movie samples into
: >industrial/electro music?
: >
: >and

: >
: >2) who was the first to shamelessly overuse and make a mockery of the
: >whole concept?
: >
: >I suspect front line ASSembly for #2. I won't make a guess on #1.
: >
: >
: >Michael J. Salo
: >sa...@andrew.cmu.edu
:
: Well, I don't know you started it but FLA, as much as I luv 'em,
: surely as hell blew it out of proportion. At least Rhys and Bill have
: kept their local video stores in business quite comfortably.
: By far the *worst* example of sample atrocities would be on Millenium.
: I swear at least half of Falling Down is on the CD.
:
: But still, 'We are not the same... I'm an American, you're a sick
: asshole!' is a great way to start a CD.

SP outdoes FLA in this dept., no?
Agree on the Millenium thing. That's a pretty choppy metal album all the
way. I gave mine away.
--

,---------------------------------------,
| Bradley A. Barkett |
'---------------------------------------'

sig...@sprintmail.com

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Jun 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/20/97
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Ian Giesbrecht wrote:

and from hellraiser no less.

--
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appropriation time will intensify
the government knows your name
so you can rest assured things will never be the same
a phone call in the middle of the night like brain dead news
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which you’re getting accused


-- m.b.m.

Al Crawford

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Jun 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/21/97
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And lo, wax...@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu (Francis X. Connor) spake unto the masses, saying...

>
> Congratulations. You competely missed the point of the song. Think about
> the title--"Thorns"--and what it implies. Then think about why one would
> want to disturb such a nice tune with such a disturbing sample. Very
> clever, methinks.

In that case the title should really be "Thorn" :-)

I'd only call it moderately clever though - if I can figure it out, it has to
be. Isn't the melody itself a steal from something else too? Seems familiar.

Tom Shear

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Jun 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/22/97
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Ian Giesbrecht wrote:

> > = "jesus had days like this..." - i don't remember the song; by FLA
> or leather strip, i think;
> > = but definitly one of the coolest samples.
>

See, that is a perfect example of what I think is WRONG with movie
samples... what the hell does it have to do with the lyrics (don't even
get me started on Leeb's lyrics...) and it's from Hellraiser, fer crying
out loud...

<daemonus>

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Jun 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/22/97
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On 22 Jun 1997, Tom Shear wrote:

> See, that is a perfect example of what I think is WRONG with movie
> samples... what the hell does it have to do with the lyrics (don't even
> get me started on Leeb's lyrics...) and it's from Hellraiser, fer crying
> out loud...
> --Tom
>

Oh, if you haven't given up on industrial lyrics yet, what's the point?
Samples though, I think, provide more of a musical element than anything
lyrical...a well placed sample can provide emphasis or some of other
aural quality to the music...again, I'm talking about the tone, rhythm
and spacing of the spoken sample, as opposed to the actual content.

Rev Ammonia D.

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Jun 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/22/97
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Well, my 2 cents. i love samples from movies. I think that there is
something subversive about snatching speach from a culture and using it
to hammer your point home.
I do think folks need to fingd some untouched movies and such. Aliens,
Bladerunner ect
have been done to death.


The Rev
Manhole Vortex( 38th top sampling band and proud of it)

kaffeetante!

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Jun 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/22/97
to Nicole Gustas


On Fri, 20 Jun 1997, Nicole Gustas wrote:

> Francis X. Connor wrote:
> >
> > Congratulations. You competely missed the point of the song. Think about
> > the title--"Thorns"--and what it implies. Then think about why one would
> > want to disturb such a nice tune with such a disturbing sample. Very
> > clever, methinks.
>

> Go Fran! Also, the instrument in question is HARP, not piano. Geez...
> IMNSHO, the sample absolutely MAKES the song.
>

****


> -rednikki


what makes you think that it is a harp? i was thinking more along the
lines of a nylon-stringed guitar, or a sampled one.

unfortunately i erased your statement about the director's cut being
better, but i'd venture that even the cool line 'whatever you say jack,
you're the master race' doesn't justify all of those extra backflips
we saw in the parking garage.....
yours,
niall.

Flavius

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Jun 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/22/97
to

>> > = "jesus had days like this..." - i don't remember the song; by FLA
>> or leather strip, i think;
>> > = but definitly one of the coolest samples.

It's from FLA's Mindphaser off Tactical Neural Implant.

>See, that is a perfect example of what I think is WRONG with movie
>samples... what the hell does it have to do with the lyrics (don't even
>get me started on Leeb's lyrics...) and it's from Hellraiser, fer crying
>out loud...

You IDIOT! The "Jesus had days..." sample is from ROBOCOP 2, not
Hellraiser! It fits perfectly well with the lyrics, if you had any idea what
the lyrics were about. they are not for the feeble minded.

Flavius

Brett Murden

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Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
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Morrigu198 (morri...@aol.com) wrote:
: Peter Christopherson, but also Christ Carter who designed most of the

: -ben

How about Perrey and Kingsley?
They were on of the fist people to use tpae loos, as far as I know anyway.


Serial.Port.Killer

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Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
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sig...@sprintmail.com wrote:

: and from hellraiser no less.

Nope. Try Robocop. :p

Later...
Morgan

--
...Serial.Port.Killer... "When all roads lead to death, there's
mwo...@gladstone.uoregon.edu no sense in running down any of them."
rive...@netcom.com -Robin Hobb
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To mail me, use either of the addresses in my .sig file, not the replyto

Dagonet

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Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to

See, I too think sampling is a matter of context. In some places, it's
all wrong and kinda fucks up the feel of the song. One example of this
is the fucking unneccessary and inappropriate "Tonight you sleep in
hell" Higlander quote in the middle of :Wumpscut:'s "Thorns". Great song
butchered by a arbitrary sample.
However, some songs are made superior by their use of samples. For
example, while I know Heavy Water Factory isn't the most original of
bands, their track "Dialog", was an incredible display of sampling.
Although "Aliens" is far from a new source for samples, HWF used Newt
and Ripley's bedtime discussion of monsters to chilling effect.
I know what you mean about FLA, though. Talk about sample saturation!
Kinda fun to play the "Where the fuck's that sample from" game,
though... I'm still busting myself in the chops trying to figure out
where that sample in the beginning of Chemlab's "Exile on Mainline" is
from....

--

Dagonet

Perkslayer and general Curmudgeon.

"The ceremony invokes the primal chaos in the surroundings,
and causes a temporary, localized change in physical reality.
Unfortunately, our human brains will ignore this change, so it will
appear as though nothing has happened. If nothing seems to happen, then
the ceremony was successful. If it starts raining cheese, you fucked
up."


-Principia Discordia

Nicole Gustas

unread,
Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to

Dagonet wrote:
>
> See, I too think sampling is a matter of context. In some places, it's
> all wrong and kinda fucks up the feel of the song. One example of this
> is the fucking unneccessary and inappropriate "Tonight you sleep in
> hell" Higlander quote in the middle of :Wumpscut:'s "Thorns". Great song
> butchered by a arbitrary sample.

Here I think you are absolutely, totally wrong. I think the song would
have been very good without the sample. However, the sample turns it
from good to fucking brilliant. Gives the song a dark twist it would
otherwise not have had.

Of course, this is why everyone's allowed to have their own opinion.

> However, some songs are made superior by their use of samples. For
> example, while I know Heavy Water Factory isn't the most original of
> bands, their track "Dialog", was an incredible display of sampling.

Great use of sampling: Machines of Loving Grace's "All I Really Need".
Very danceable and DAMN amusing (due to the samples). The samples give
a nice counterpoint to the lyrics.

-rednikki

Donald R. Harvill

unread,
Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to

> And as far as band who pioneered sampling: were anyone to crawl out from
> their Industrial holes, they'd realize that the band that probably has the
> highest movie samples-to-notes ratio in popular music is Big Audio
> Dynamite. Play _This Is Big Audio Dynamite_ and keep in mind that it
> predates most second-generation industrial/sample bands. "Go ahead,
> London" indeed.

Definitely Don Letts' influence; he was a filmmaker before joining the
band, and is credited with "F.X., vocals" on the disc. "The horses ...
are on the track."

> Also influential: M/A/R/R/S's "Pump Up the Volume," heralded as innovative
> in its time because of its reliance on samples (still a great song, BTW).

The band Colourbox (brothers Steven and Martyn Young) were half of
M/A/R/R/S, and made extensive use of samples in their music. Their s/t
EP from 1983 is a brilliant mixture of soul, synthpop, dub, and dialogue
samples. "Just Give 'em Whiskey" from their s/t LP from 1985 used
samples from lots of science fiction films, and there are many more
examples. Everyone here on RMI should find Colourbox's two CDs
interesting artifacts, if not enjoy them in their own right.

> Of course, no one's mentioned Cabaret Voltaire's pioneering cut-ups. But
> that's to be expected.

Considering most of this thread is folks complaining about
misuse/overuse of samples, perhaps that's for the best -- Donald R.
Harvill

-----
(Now Playing: <This is Big Audio Dynamite>)

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.
Inside of a dog it's too dark to read." -- Groucho Marx

Join the fight for legal measures against unsolicited commercial email
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Rocky Bergen

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Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to

>Well, I don't know you started it but FLA, as much as I luv 'em,
>surely as hell blew it out of proportion. At least Rhys and Bill have
>kept their local video stores in business quite comfortably.
>By far the *worst* example of sample atrocities would be on Millenium.
>I swear at least half of Falling Down is on the CD.
>
>But still, 'We are not the same... I'm an American, you're a sick
>asshole!' is a great way to start a CD.


No shit... but I LOVE that movie so I forgive them... Maybe Millenium is
actually the Falling Down soundtrack... yeah... sure...

Rock.

Raistlin Majere

unread,
Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to

[posted and mailed]

On 20 Jun 1997 15:17:17 GMT, wax...@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu (Francis X. Connor)
hath spoken thus:

>In any case, I've heard that the line is not a sample at all, but Rudy's
>heavily distorted voice. I'm not vouching for the veracity of that, but
>some have specualted such.

As far as I know, it's a sample from a Highlander movie, probably the first.

Another little piece of :w: trivia: did anyone ever wonder why Selene is
credited with the vocals to "Thorns" in BT7's liner notes? Well, she was
supposed to sing on that song (she already provided the French vocals for
"Black Death"), but at some point during production Rudy decided to make
"Thorns" an instrumental. Salt didn't get around to changing the liner notes
in time, though =;)

Raist


Ein Neuer Mensch ist unsichtbar, Neuer Mensch ist schoen
Neuer Mensch ist kampfbereit, Neuer Mensch ist grausam kalt

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arschgeil!

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Jun 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/23/97
to Flavius

hello, flavius...
eeeeyyuuugh i don't know about fla lyrics not being for the feeble-minded.
the only cool lyrics in 'mindphaser' are the ones bill stole from
clock dva, and those aren't very great, either. sorry if that shear
fellow's post offended your literary sensibilities. or something.
yours,
niall.


the street of crocodiles is a weekly radio show showcasing eleqtro,
darkwave, experimental, and techno on 90.9, wcdb, albany, new york.
call at 518.442.4242 thursdays from 8pm to 11pm for requests or heavy
breathing. ask for niall.
'street' is loosely affiliated with the millennium corporation:
http://www.rpi.edu/~webbc for details.


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year's mouldering newspapers.'
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praenatal rust is coming.

Wesley Alan Johansen

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

In <0neKu5200YUf0=Rv...@andrew.cmu.edu> Adam K Rixey
<nya...@andrew.cmu.edu> writes:
>
>"Michael J. Salo" <fstf...@pacbell.net> writes:
>> It's so unbelievably overdone and so pointless. It gets so f---ing
>> old. I'm going to kill the next generic electro band that puts
Robocop
>> or Bladerunner quotes in the middle of their songs.

The worst in one someone samples the CROW. like you won't know you it
is. I like samples but only if they aren't obvious or made by the
artist. The only people you can infinitly sample are ministers.

Mephistopheles

unread,
Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

Dagonet (co...@bgnet.bgsu.edu) wrote:
: I know what you mean about FLA, though. Talk about sample saturation!

: Kinda fun to play the "Where the fuck's that sample from" game,
: though... I'm still busting myself in the chops trying to figure out
: where that sample in the beginning of Chemlab's "Exile on Mainline" is
: from....

If that's the "Move when I say move you mother-fucker" sample, that
bit is from Shawshank Redemption when Clancy Brown (kick-ass actor who
also did the Kurgan) is beating up the fat inmate. Great sample. :)

It's true that the obscure samples are the best. Being a really big
movie-buff, I love noticing clips from those more obscure films I
like. While I haven't seen the original material, I really like what
Bile does with the porno samples in I think Part II on Teknowhore...

: Dagonet

: Perkslayer and general Curmudgeon.

- DeViL BeN


Mister Sister

unread,
Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

Has anyone ever sampled "The Princess Bride"? I think that would be
funny. They've got some great lines in there. "Incontheivable!" "As
you wish." "May I live a thousand years and never hunt again." "Hello.
My name is Inigo Montoyo. Prepare to die." "I would not say such
things if I were you." "Have fun storming the castle!"

Nicole Gustas

unread,
Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

kaffeetante! wrote:
> [re: :wumpscut: - Thorns]

> what makes you think that it is a harp? i was thinking more along the
> lines of a nylon-stringed guitar, or a sampled one.

Aside from industrial and gothic, I also listen to classical and Irish
harp music. I've also played nylon-stringed guitar, and this sounds way
more like harp than guitar to me. Of course, he could just be using the
"harp" function on his Casio keyboard.

> unfortunately i erased your statement about the director's cut being
> better, but i'd venture that even the cool line 'whatever you say jack,
> you're the master race' doesn't justify all of those extra backflips
> we saw in the parking garage.....

Perhaps not, but I think the backstory on Rachel does.

-rednikki

Raistlin Majere

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

[posted and mailed]

On Mon, 23 Jun 1997 11:05:25 -0400, Nicole Gustas <redn...@obscure.org>
hath spoken thus:

>Here I think you are absolutely, totally wrong. I think the song would
>have been very good without the sample. However, the sample turns it
>from good to fucking brilliant. Gives the song a dark twist it would
>otherwise not have had.

Anyway, we'll never know as long as Rudy doesn't release the lyrics that
were originally planned for "Thorns".

Skarekroe

unread,
Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

:Another little piece of :w: trivia: did anyone ever wonder why Selene is

:credited with the vocals to "Thorns" in BT7's liner notes? Well, she was
:supposed to sing on that song (she already provided the French vocals for
:"Black Death"), but at some point during production Rudy decided to make
:"Thorns" an instrumental. Salt didn't get around to changing the liner
:notes
:in time, though =;)

which begs the rather rhetorical questions... is there a version of thorns
WITH the vocals? and will it ever be released?

sk

Marc42

unread,
Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
to

The problem with movie samples is everybody knows the source. Even if
it hasn't been used in any other songs, people are familiar with it.

The key is to either A) use samples from movies no one has seen, B)
avoid horror/sci-fi/violent movies, or C) preferably both.

For example, the band I manage has a song that is basically a
description of a nightmare the lead singer had. We used a sample that
said "You don't want to hear about my dreams, they're sick...they make
Blue Velvet look like National Velvet." The line was spoken by Kevin
Bacon in an obscure romantic comedy called Pyrates. It fits the song
perfectly, and no one has ever identified it. Every industrial fan has
seen Robocop, but how many have seen Pyrates.

At their last show, the band was doing a improv experimental thing. I
threw on a video of a performance artist and turned up the sound. The
video was from the film "Fear, Anxiety, & Depression", but several
people asked me after the show if we had shot it ourselves. The
trash-talking performance artist sounded great against the music and
it will probably get used someday as a sample.

Anyway, movie samples are great...the key is being creative. If it
seems too obvious...don't use it! (We are guilty of using ONE tiny
Blade Runner sample before we knew better and it kinda stuck.)

;p
Marc

The keys to Marc42's Gate are here again
http://www.azaccess.com/~marc42
-----------------------------------------
"Let's face it...there's nothing more fun than
shaving...and there's nothing more ironic than
shaving a baby...and if there's one thing kids
love, it's irony!"
- Johnny Bluejeans & The former Mrs Laupan
-----------------------------------------
E-Mail: mar...@azaccess.com

Dagonet

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

Raistlin Majere wrote:
>
> As far as I know, it's a sample from a Highlander movie, probably the first.
>


Yup. Just as Ramirez is about to be beheaded in Connor's crumbling
castle, the fateful words are spoken....

--

Dagonet

Perkslayer and general Curmudgeon.

"The ceremony invokes the primal chaos in the surroundings,

Dagonet

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

Nicole Gustas wrote:
> Here I think you are absolutely, totally wrong. I think the song would
> have been very good without the sample. However, the sample turns it
> from good to fucking brilliant. Gives the song a dark twist it would
> otherwise not have had.
>
> Of course, this is why everyone's allowed to have their own opinion.


What relevance did the sample have, though? Admittedly, it's a nice
sample, but to me, "Thorns" is a beautiful, emotional, melancholy piece
with medieval overtone. I just think that it's dearth of lyrics made it
a vessel for pure emotion. The vessel was made somewhat unclean by the
loud, hard-assed, arbitrary Highlander quote. It seems that a sample was
quite neccessary at that juncture in the song, but something heartbroken
or forlorn wouldv'e seemed more appropriate to me. But, again, we have
the whole opinion thing. :P


> g.
>
> Great use of sampling: Machines of Loving Grace's "All I Really Need".
> Very danceable and DAMN amusing (due to the samples). The samples give
> a nice counterpoint to the lyrics.
>
> -rednikki

Agreed. "All I Really Need" still makes me laugh. Makes you wanna dance
as well. But that song was more upbeat and lyrical anyway (not that the
lyrics rang with any great profundity, mind you). It's an example of a
song that thrives on it's samples, however many obscenities they may
involve... :)

Serial.Port.Killer

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

Marc42 (look.in.m...@if.you.have.something.to.say) wrote:

: The key is to either A) use samples from movies no one has seen, B)


: avoid horror/sci-fi/violent movies, or C) preferably both.

Yeah, but unfortunately the vast majority of films from non-horror
non-scifi genres don't have any lines worth sampling. When was the
last time anyone saw a romantic comedy which was worth laying down over a
4-4 beat? ;)

Most "industrial" bands write lyrics with horror/sci-fi qualities to
them. If you want the sample to fit the song, you're pretty much forced
to look in those genres. The trick, is to keep your choices obscure.
Claus Larsen is great at this: raise your hand if you can actually
identify the "I can fucking smell your dreams" sample.

: Anyway, movie samples are great...the key is being creative. If it
: seems too obvious...don't use it! (We are guilty of using ONE tiny
: Blade Runner sample before we knew better and it kinda stuck.)

Bladerunner samples can still be interesting. Forma Tadre's an obvious
example.

Hellraiser, is another matter entirely. ;)

Peter Ronaszeki

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

It is interesting to see that some people dislike movie samples so much...
It was FLA's great taste in movies (Carpenter, Cameron, Scott, Raimi,
etc.), combined with Bill/Rhys' technical wizardry and superb sense of
atmosphere, that attracted me to their sound in the first place. FLA use
selected cult movie samples to inject the mood of a film into their music.
This fits perfectly with the themes of FLA's tracks, and I wouldn't have
it any other way.


Peter Ronaszeki (pred...@tartarus.uwa.edu.au)

_THE ENTERTAINMENT NEXUS_
( Movies, video games, sci-fi, multimedia downloads, etc. )

*** http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/~predator ***

S. N. Wetherbee

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

>> Here I think you are absolutely, totally wrong. I think the song
would
>> have been very good without the sample. However, the sample turns
it
>> from good to fucking brilliant. Gives the song a dark twist it
would
>> otherwise not have had.
>>
>> Of course, this is why everyone's allowed to have their own opinion.
>
>
> What relevance did the sample have, though? Admittedly, it's a
nice
>sample, but to me, "Thorns" is a beautiful, emotional, melancholy
piece
>with medieval overtone. I just think that it's dearth of lyrics made
it
>a vessel for pure emotion. The vessel was made somewhat unclean by the
>loud, hard-assed, arbitrary Highlander quote. It seems that a sample
was
>quite neccessary at that juncture in the song, but something
heartbroken
>or forlorn wouldv'e seemed more appropriate to me. But, again, we have
>the whole opinion thing. :P

I took in stride as part of Xian mythology, Christ (wearing the crown
of thorns), dies in descends into hell (hence the sample) in order to
save the souls of sinners. Pretty effective in my book.

web

T. Elkington

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to


On Wed, 25 Jun 1997, Dagonet wrote:

> Nicole Gustas wrote:
> >
> > Great use of sampling: Machines of Loving Grace's "All I Really Need".
> > Very danceable and DAMN amusing (due to the samples). The samples give
> > a nice counterpoint to the lyrics.
> >
> > -rednikki
>
> Agreed. "All I Really Need" still makes me laugh. Makes you wanna dance
> as well. But that song was more upbeat and lyrical anyway (not that the
> lyrics rang with any great profundity, mind you). It's an example of a
> song that thrives on it's samples, however many obscenities they may
> involve... :)
>

Speaking of Machines of Loving Grace, have they done anything since
"Gilt"? Granted, that album isn't the greatest, but some of their other
stuff is pretty good. I haven't heard anything lately, though.

Trevor

Marc42

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

On Wed, 25 Jun 1997 06:01:59 GMT, rive...@netcom.com
(Serial.Port.Killer) wrote:

>Marc42 (look.in.m...@if.you.have.something.to.say) wrote:
>
>: The key is to either A) use samples from movies no one has seen, B)
>: avoid horror/sci-fi/violent movies, or C) preferably both.
>
>Yeah, but unfortunately the vast majority of films from non-horror
>non-scifi genres don't have any lines worth sampling. When was the
>last time anyone saw a romantic comedy which was worth laying down over a
>4-4 beat? ;)
>

Actually, I gave an example of one we used and here's another... We
used a line from "Say Anything" in a environmental doomsday song.
("When I think about the future, I am really...scared".) I've had
people tell me it sounded familiar, but no one has identified it.

You're sort of right about typical mainstream hollywood garbage, but
if you dig slightly under the surface and find a film with smart
writing, there's a goldmine of good lines, no matter what the genre.

>Most "industrial" bands write lyrics with horror/sci-fi qualities to
>them. If you want the sample to fit the song, you're pretty much forced
>to look in those genres.

I don't believe that at all. The trick is taking the lines out of
context. Who cares what kind of movie it's from, as long as that one
little snippet fits?

> The trick, is to keep your choices obscure.
>Claus Larsen is great at this: raise your hand if you can actually
>identify the "I can fucking smell your dreams" sample.
>

I can't, but I can identify the samples in "Guilty"...they from
"Girlfriend From Hell.". Definately not a FUNNY movie, but I guess it
would be classified a "comedy" by definition. See, Claus does it
too...

>: Anyway, movie samples are great...the key is being creative. If it
>: seems too obvious...don't use it! (We are guilty of using ONE tiny
>: Blade Runner sample before we knew better and it kinda stuck.)
>
>Bladerunner samples can still be interesting. Forma Tadre's an obvious
>example.
>

Yeah, but PWEI did the definitive Blade Runner song IMHO.

>Hellraiser, is another matter entirely. ;)
>

Haven't even seen it :)

h-son

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

In article <rivethedE...@netcom.com>, rive...@blow.me.spammer.scumbag wrote:
>Marc42 (look.in.m...@if.you.have.something.to.say) wrote:
>
>: The key is to either A) use samples from movies no one has seen, B)
>: avoid horror/sci-fi/violent movies, or C) preferably both.
>
>Yeah, but unfortunately the vast majority of films from non-horror
>non-scifi genres don't have any lines worth sampling. When was the
>last time anyone saw a romantic comedy which was worth laying down over a
>4-4 beat? ;)

More often than you'd think. Newscasts/documentaries make excellent sample
sources. Romantic sob movies and crap TV "drama" (yes, I've seen those - girl
influence!) can often be very "dramatic" (i.e. they say the lines to be as
dramatic as possible); great and obscure enough to be unidentifiable. Or,
almost any 60:s TV series with a narrator - those guys always used to speak in
a very "dramatic" voice (making them sound really silly). Be creative.

(And, just to respond to the comedy reference: haven't you ever seen a bad
comedy where a punchline is "I'll kill you, man, I swear I'll kill you."? I
have. So 'industrial' it's a stereotype.)

That said, I too am getting rather fed up with film samples in music. If you
find a really good one that fits with the song, use it. Otherwise, forget it.

Just my $.02.

/h-son

------------------------------------+------------------------------
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http://www.ludd.luth.se/users/h-son | F0 41 36 01 23 01 01 13 7F F7
------------------------------------+------------------------------

crisp insect flavour

unread,
Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
to

Marc42 wrote:
>
> The problem with movie samples is everybody knows the source. Even if
> it hasn't been used in any other songs, people are familiar with it.

the actual problem w/ movie samples is that it has been done to death.
even if i can't recognize a band's sample sources, i can still recognize
the type of cookie cutter they were cut from...
also, the few bands who do use movie samples well have their creativity
sucked away by the millions who do it poorly. even a brilliant sample
will seem lackluster, just because it's a tired old gimmick.

np: link "arcadian"
--
Here lies a youth who died of consumption:
you know why
Do not pray for him

Serial.Port.Killer

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

@netcom.com:> <5os9qe$lo0$1...@news.luth.se>
Organization: Netcom On-Line Services
Reply-To: rive...@blow.me.spammer.scumbag
Distribution:

h-son (do...@want.spam) wrote:

: More often than you'd think. Newscasts/documentaries make excellent sample

: sources. Romantic sob movies and crap TV "drama" (yes, I've seen those - girl
: influence!) can often be very "dramatic" (i.e. they say the lines to be as
: dramatic as possible); great and obscure enough to be unidentifiable. Or,
: almost any 60:s TV series with a narrator - those guys always used to speak in
: a very "dramatic" voice (making them sound really silly). Be creative.

Yeah, that occurred to me after I hit the post button. The vast majority
of informatik and Din_Fiv samples sound like they come from romances of
some sort, and deffinitely work in the song.

Although I still don't think Sleepless in Seattle is going to beat out
Bladerunner for over-sampling anytime soon. ;)

Raistlin Majere

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

[posted and mailed]

On 24 Jun 1997 16:52:43 GMT, skar...@aol.com (Skarekroe) hath spoken thus:

>which begs the rather rhetorical questions... is there a version of thorns
>WITH the vocals? and will it ever be released?

From what Rudy told me, the vocal track was never recorded.

Alex

unread,
Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

T. Elkington (telk...@u.washington.edu) plastered all over the bandwidth...
: Speaking of Machines of Loving Grace, have they done anything since

: "Gilt"? Granted, that album isn't the greatest, but some of their other
: stuff is pretty good. I haven't heard anything lately, though.
:
According to Mike Fisher, they've been doing pre-production on a new album
that'll be *much* more electronic than Gilt. The lineup hasn't changed at
all though.

Check out my homepage for the band at Gardens of Grace,
http://cspo.queensu.ca/~fletcher/Molg/


F.
--
Erm... Yeah. Whatever.


Robby Johnson

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Jun 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/27/97
to

i heard the same from josh wittman at mammoth. i spoke with him briefly
at the masss symposium. he said they were now writing new stuff for an
upcoming release.

vrooom!


Don Muerte

unread,
Jun 28, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/28/97
to

S. N. Wetherbee wrote:
> I took in stride as part of Xian mythology, Christ (wearing the crown
> of thorns), dies in descends into hell (hence the sample) in order to
> save the souls of sinners. Pretty effective in my book.
>
> web

I think this is the answer we've been looking for. Good one Mr.
Wetherbee! :)
--
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Don Muerte

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Jun 28, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/28/97
to

Dagonet wrote:
>
> See, I too think sampling is a matter of context. In some places, it's
> all wrong and kinda fucks up the feel of the song. One example of this
> is the fucking unneccessary and inappropriate "Tonight you sleep in
> hell" Higlander quote in the middle of :Wumpscut:'s "Thorns". Great song
> butchered by a arbitrary sample.
> However, some songs are made superior by their use of samples. For
> example, while I know Heavy Water Factory isn't the most original of
> bands, their track "Dialog", was an incredible display of sampling.
> Although "Aliens" is far from a new source for samples, HWF used Newt
> and Ripley's bedtime discussion of monsters to chilling effect.

> I know what you mean about FLA, though. Talk about sample saturation!
> Kinda fun to play the "Where the fuck's that sample from" game,
> though... I'm still busting myself in the chops trying to figure out
> where that sample in the beginning of Chemlab's "Exile on Mainline" is
> from....

Mr. Dagonet,
Why are you always so wrong? (Don't worry, I know him personally. He
can fight for himself.) Thorns is a great song. The song would be
incomplete without that one little sample, however. I've been finding it
hard, lately, to criticize an artist's work. I find it extremely easy to
say that I don't care for certain things; however, I feel that whatever
Rudy's reasoning for including that sample is perfectly alright with me
and it doesn't give the song a different feel one bit, in my oppinion.

Dagonet

unread,
Jun 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/29/97
to

Don Muerte wrote:
>
> S. N. Wetherbee wrote:
> > I took in stride as part of Xian mythology, Christ (wearing the crown
> > of thorns), dies in descends into hell (hence the sample) in order to
> > save the souls of sinners. Pretty effective in my book.
> >
> > web
>
> I think this is the answer we've been looking for. Good one Mr.
> Wetherbee! :)
> --
> Live long and prosper, /\ /\
> - 'Coffee' \ \"````"/


I think that's the biggest goddamn stretch I've ever heard.
Typical of Don Muerte to back the flimsiest bullshit he can find, just
to support his own senseless opinions. I love that boy...

Dagonet

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Jun 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/29/97
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Don Muerte wrote:
> Mr. Dagonet,
> Why are you always so wrong?

Why are you always convinced you have all the answers? As a humna,
you're as falliable as the rest of us. That means that you are (dare I
say it) capable of being not only wrong, but belligerently so.

Thorns is a great song.

Yes. It is.

The song would be
> incomplete without that one little sample, however.

I believe I mentioned that the song truly did require a sample at that
point, just that the particular quote used was hard-assed and
inappropriate.

I've been finding it
> hard, lately, to criticize an artist's work. I find it extremely easy to
> say that I don't care for certain things;

OK. Ummm, what's the fucking difference? Criticism is the very act of
saying what you do and don't think is good about a piece. Christ,
Coffee, you're such a bleeding mongoloid.

however, I feel that whatever
> Rudy's reasoning for including that sample is perfectly alright with me
> and it doesn't give the song a different feel one bit, in my oppinion.

Sounds like a bit of hero worship to me. It sounds to me like his
reasoning was simply "What would sound cool here"? It doesn't sound
sincere, or valid or genuine. It just sounds like he wanted something
"cool and dark". SO, again, fuck you. But that's just my oppppppinion.

plonk.

> --
> Live long and prosper, /\ /\

> - 'Coffee' \ \"````"/ /
> ________ //^\ /^\\
> |J ______|_ ;/ ~_\ /_~ \;
> |o|J . . | <IDONTWANTTOWASTEYOURTIMEBYPUTTING> | / \\// \ |
> |k| )\_/( | <POINTLESSBANDNAMESINMYSIGSOILLJUST> (, \0/ \0/ ,)
> |e| @ @ | <USEPOINTLESSBSTOMAKEITAPPEARASTHO> | / \ |
> |r| ( ~ ) | <IDIDTOTHOSEWHOAREILLITERATEASWELL> | (_\.__./_) |
> |_| \O/ | <ASTHOSEWHOAREBLIND~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~> \ \-v..v-/ /
> |_______I| \ `====' /
> `\\\///'
> '\\//'
> COME SEE THE GLORIES OF N3UR0C0RE.CACH3: \/
> http://members.aol.com/xbaconbitz/dragons.html

--

corpsehea...@gmail.com

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Nov 13, 2014, 2:42:31 PM11/13/14
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I love movie samples in industrial music!! Takes the listener to a diff level !!! Ministry sampled the hell out of platoon and full metal jacket!! Combichrist does it.... skinny puppy does it.... Hater!!! The internet is full of haters behind a keyboard!! Go tell the bands this!! Just add em on facebook and tell them you hate movie samples!!! Who cares what you think
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dj_evol_eno

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Dec 5, 2014, 11:54:06 AM12/5/14
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On Wednesday, December 3, 2014 3:08:28 PM UTC-5, je.s...@hehxduhmp.org wrote:
> corpseheadgraphics wrote:
> > I love movie samples in industrial music!! Takes the listener to a diff level !!! Ministry sampled the hell out of platoon and full metal jacket!! Combichrist does it.... skinny puppy does it.... Hater!!! The internet is full of haters behind a keyboard!! Go tell the bands this!! Just add em on facebook and tell them you hate movie samples!!! Who cares what you think
>
> It got to an absurd point in the late 90s (e.g. Velvet Acid Christ!) but
> I do mourn the loss of them

I think it all comes down to how well it's done and if the sample or the movie the sample comes from hasn't already been over played.

Ministry sampling Full Metal Jacket was good and early one could almost say innovative... well, maybe, but a decade later, it seemed as though every other industrial band thought they should sample it as well. This happened so much many of us got to enjoy the campaign started by Caustic, "Stop Sampling Full Metal Jacket!"
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UMan

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Jan 28, 2015, 5:44:51 PM1/28/15
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> > I think it all comes down to how well it's done and if the sample or the movie the sample comes from hasn't already been over played.
>
> This NG used to have a list in the 90s of the most sampled sources and the
> most sampling bands. The two were pretty neat to look at, particularly the
> former. As one might expect, Blade Runner was always right at the top.

I loved a lot of the samples 242 used back in the day. So many of them were just there because they found them interesting and built songs with them. Which meant most of their samples were not from recognizable nerd-genre-classic movies.

Negativland was interesting in that they built pieces around the samples themselves as the sort of foundation artifact. They also didn't tend to sample from well-known movies. One of their best-known pieces, "Christianity Is Stupid," comes from a bizarre christian exploitation ("christsploitation") movie in the 70s that not too many people have heard of.

The problem with overuse of movie samples, I think, has to do with a band trying to stamp their music with some kind of genre cred and thereby make it legit somehow. That's different than just using it purely creatively.
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mimus

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Mar 23, 2015, 6:24:06 PM3/23/15