Girls and aggresive rap

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Tony1er

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Sep 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/15/98
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I was chilling with my gilr last night and we started talking about hip hop and
what she likes and dislikes. let me first say that she does not like most rap
and mostly listens to jazz, funk and shit like portishead (no disrespect cause
they are dope). anyway, it dawns on me, for the first time in my life, why most
girls will never get deep into rap (there are exceptions). girls do not like
overly agressive music. you will never hear a girl give freddie foxxx props.
you will never hear a girl say how much she likes that new MOP album. to
agressive.I was playing my girls some beats I made and she loved the meloncholy
ones but as soon as I started with the fat hip hop tracks, she wasn't having
it. even the beats were too aggressive. and I'm not basing this all on this one
girl. every girl I've ever made a mix tape for was the same. they want groups
like pharcyde, tribe, de la,freestyle fellowship,the coup but put some co-flow
on it....that tape is in the never listen to bin.
with battle rapping comes a certain agressiveness, therefore girls don't like
battle rhyming.therefore girls don't like 75% of all good hip hop. of course
this is a generalization but, guys, am I for the most part right? and girls,
can you see how your sisters are like this?
later tony


Tim Brown

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Sep 15, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/15/98
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Tony1er <ton...@aol.com> wrote in article
<199809151812...@ladder01.news.aol.com>...


> I was chilling with my gilr last night and we started talking about hip
hop and
> what she likes and dislikes. let me first say that she does not like most
rap
> and mostly listens to jazz, funk and shit like portishead (no disrespect
cause
> they are dope). anyway, it dawns on me, for the first time in my life,
why most
> girls will never get deep into rap (there are exceptions). girls do not
like
> overly agressive music. you will never hear a girl give freddie foxxx
props.
> you will never hear a girl say how much she likes that new MOP album. to
> agressive.I was playing my girls some beats I made and she loved the
meloncholy
> ones but as soon as I started with the fat hip hop tracks, she wasn't
having
> it. even the beats were too aggressive. and I'm not basing this all on
this one
> girl. every girl I've ever made a mix tape for was the same. they want
groups
> like pharcyde, tribe, de la,freestyle fellowship,the coup but put some
co-flow
> on it....that tape is in the never listen to bin.

I made two tapes for one of my friends who wants to learn more about hip
hop. She really liked "Preschool Break Mix" when I played it in her car and
she wanted to borrow it.....she was like "This is cool, what is this,
techno? Hip Hop?"

I put some Tribe, Siah and Yeshua, "Travelin' Man," some Rakim tracks from
Follow the Leader (I think she'll like "Eric B Never Scared"), some Co Flow
tracks (Collude/Intrude, The Fire...., End to End), "Luchini," "TROY," some
Roots tracks, some Digable Planets (like Rebirth of Slick), and I don't
remember the rest. I also let her borrow 3 ft. High and Rising (if she
doesn't return it I will kill her). I am determined to make a hip hop head
out of her yet.

> with battle rapping comes a certain agressiveness, therefore girls don't
like
> battle rhyming.therefore girls don't like 75% of all good hip hop. of
course
> this is a generalization but, guys, am I for the most part right?

What about the girls who like No Limit, DMX and Busta Rhymes? They're never
aggressive?

Neiladri

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Sep 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/16/98
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Tony1er wrote:
> of course
>this is a generalization but, guys, am I for the most part right?

I would say so.

But once a "hard" or "roughneck" artist makes a popular r&b flavored track,
then (huge generalization here) a lot of girls start feeling him. examples?
Method Man, Busta, Tupac, Biggie, Big Pun.

But, recently, a lot of girls seem to be bucking that trend. Maybe it's
because radio stations play more 'commercial hardcore' (Nore, Big Pun, DMX) but
it's just weird to me when I see a shorty jamming to _Get At Me Dog_ at the
club.

peace,

Neil


"Cuz I'ma cool cat, just like Heathcliff"
-A.G.

Ruckstuhl

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Sep 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/16/98
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Ay Tony,
so I've read your message and I must give ou the right. It's really very
often that the girls don't like the aggressive Hip Hop, but I'm a girl too
and I don't like the "soft" HH. I love Heltah Skeltah, Gravediggaz, Wu
thangs, Mobb Deep and so on.....I think that a lot of girls like the other
things 'cause they want to listens some more romantic things. But what's
your prob ? Just 'cause the girls don't like the same things you do ? I
didn' t understand it all
so enjoy every day in your life and listen to the deadly melody of the daily
wind
Queen T-Zai

Tony1er schrieb in Nachricht

>with battle rapping comes a certain agressiveness, therefore girls don't
like

>battle rhyming.therefore girls don't like 75% of all good hip hop. of
course
>this is a generalization but, guys, am I for the most part right? and

Tony1er

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Sep 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/16/98
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I think my problem with the interest most ladies have shown in hip hop is their
taste. like a few people said, it's all groups that hot 97 play. i really don't
think most girls feel kool g rap or rakim. I'm not mad at them it's just kind
of funny that hip hop is like that. it almost makes music specifically for
males and when there is a song for girls, it's wack(R&B joints).
When I make a mix for girls (which I have done many times and always get
sweated for more from their friends) I put on very certain groups. I don't go
to co-flow. I don't put on rakim or even P.E.. I go with stuff that is either
light hearted, jazzy, or kind of sensitive. from my experiences girls love
aceyalone. hate mop.
more power to them. the only thing is, in most cases,girls will not hunt down
good hip hop. guys will. how many ladie sdo you know that fiend for new
groundbreaking hip hop? I don't know any. and I live in a big city where most
girls I know like hip hop in one way or another.
later tony

Spirit68

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Sep 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/16/98
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>i really don't
>think most girls feel kool g rap or rakim

are you kidding?

every (black) girl over 14 when Rakim dropped his first album feels him...

you ever see a club when they drop "eric b is president"?

Peace,

Spirit
Spread Love/Amphibians

The Amphibians' debut single "Lettuce (Entertain You)" b/w "Journey" is
available NOW, on vinyl ($5) and cassettes ($3), add $2 for shipping tapes, $3
for shipping vinyl. E-mail me for more details...

Steve 'Flash' Juon

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to Spirit68
Yeah. And a lot of fuckin people front.
You think not? Trust me. Unless it's a hip-hop audience or it's
a majority urban crowd with an average age of 25, nobody knows it.
Sad times. The classics are all forgotten.

The DJ can throw on "The Symphony" at a Common Sense show and everybody
gets buck buck buck but if the DJ at your local club drops it they'll
scream, "FUCK THAT SHIT PLAY SOME MASTER P FOOL!!!"

Peace, Flash

Spirit68 wrote:
> you ever see a club when they drop "eric b is president"?
>
> Peace,
>
> Spirit
> Spread Love/Amphibians
>
> The Amphibians' debut single "Lettuce (Entertain You)" b/w "Journey" is
> available NOW, on vinyl ($5) and cassettes ($3), add $2 for shipping tapes, $3
> for shipping vinyl. E-mail me for more details...

--
"Under a microscope I walk a tightrope
A thin line between insanity and sanity" --> Del
Steve 'Flash' Juon --> remove 'nospam' from message for e-mail
Hip-Hop Lyrics Archive --> http://www.OHHLA.com
Suite 101's Hip-Hop --> http://www.suite101.com/topics/page.cfm/116

Jupiter

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
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ton...@aol.com (Tony1er) wrote:

>more power to them. the only thing is, in most cases,girls will not hunt down
>good hip hop. guys will. how many ladie sdo you know that fiend for new
>groundbreaking hip hop? I don't know any. and I live in a big city where most
>girls I know like hip hop in one way or another.
>later tony


There was this cute blonde at the local recordshop who came in asking
"did the new King Tee arrive yet?"

huge turn-on.

peAce,
Joe "oeh, me legs gone" Piler.


angela

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
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: >more power to them. the only thing is, in most cases,girls will not hunt down

: >good hip hop. guys will. how many ladie sdo you know that fiend for new
: >groundbreaking hip hop? I don't know any. and I live in a big city where most
: >girls I know like hip hop in one way or another.
: >later tony

Man, I wish you guys read girlie magazines. I mean like Glamour and
Mademoiselle. There was a nice quote in one of my mags from a woman who
is on Vibe's staff about how she feels about hip-hop. She likened hiphop
to an errant boyfriend. Exactly how I feel. I have a serious love-hate
relationship with it. I love it to death cause when it's good...it's
really good.

But when it's bad...

Anyway...

Do women fiend for new groundbreaking hiphop? Not many, but I think not
many men do either. RMHH may give one a distorted view. Most men I know who
listen and know hiphop don't actively search out new acts.

Being a fiend for hiphop does not necessarily mean actively seeking out
new acts who are dropping it. I fiend for the music, but not as actively
as I have in the past. I now fiend for people's interactions with hiphop
music: what it does to them, how it changes their views, how and if they
feel they belong in the culture.

When I have convos with my hiphop colleagues, this is what we discuss.
Sure, a peripheral conversation might touch on a Mad Skillz or Mountain
Brothers, we're always hype to have our hands on some fly tracks, but it's
the movement of the culture *beyond* those tracks that entices me the most.

: There was this cute blonde at the local recordshop who came in asking


: "did the new King Tee arrive yet?"

: huge turn-on.

Until she yelled out to her big Black boyfriend waiting in the car "Yeah,
they got it, honey!"

Jokes.

Angieee (not blonde, but I do have fun)

--
homepage: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~anissel

ICQ: 18426949

AlanPage

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
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>Yeah. And a lot of fuckin people front.

Yeah, and you didn't read my post. I was referring to girls 14 and up when
"Eric B is President" first dropped. They will all hit the dance floor when
Rakim comes on and they all currently in their mid-20s or above, which leads to
your next statement...

>Unless it's a hip-hop audience or it's
>a majority urban crowd with an average age of 25,

Wow...what a surprise, those were actually the people I was talking about in my
post.

Peace,

Spirit
Spread Love/Amphibians

The Amphibians' debut single "Lettuce (Entertain You)" b/w "Journey" will be
available August 9th, on vinyl ($5) and cassettes ($3), add $2 for
shipping/handling. E-mail me for more details...

Olskool74

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to

>Do women fiend for new groundbreaking hiphop? Not many, but I think not
>many men do either. RMHH may give one a distorted view. Most men I know who
>listen and know hiphop don't actively search out new acts.

Yeah. I see that. May be a money thing. That's why I'm always at the mixtape
stand. You get to sample. If I hear something good, I'll find out who the kid
is and maybe check out more of his / her stuff.

Have you ever checked out female hip-hop writers? When I do talk to women about
hiphop, they seem to delve more into the political aspects. They also know what
they are talking about. Maybe it's my environment, I'm surrounded by hiphop
lovers. If I was living in a suburb or something, maybe I wouldn't know any
hiphop females.

>When I have convos with my hiphop colleagues, this is what we discuss.
>Sure, a peripheral conversation might touch on a Mad Skillz or Mountain
>Brothers, we're always hype to have our hands on some fly tracks, but it's
>the movement of the culture *beyond* those tracks that entices me the most.

Has any music had more influence? I'll admit, I'm more ignorant than I'd like
to be on other musical genres. Hiphop permeates into every sector. Did anyone
see Fox Files the night they profiled the wealthy white suburban kids who said
they identified more with black hiphop culture than their own culture? The
upset parents? Funny, but crazy interesting.

>: There was this cute blonde at the local recordshop who came in asking
>: "did the new King Tee arrive yet?"
>
>: huge turn-on.
>
>Until she yelled out to her big Black boyfriend waiting in the car "Yeah,
>they got it, honey!"
>
>Jokes.
>
>Angieee (not blonde, but I do have fun)

Oh God. =-)

OlSkool.

Steve 'Flash' Juon

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to AlanPage
Then we agree.
Doesn't remove the merit of my point though:
too many fuckin people front on the hip-hop classics.
There's no educational structure to bring up the next
generation of hip-hop with the history of the past days
and consequently we get all bent out of shape when all
they want to listen to is No Limit and Puffy yet they
call Rakim and BDP wack. If we taught them about it
from the jump so they could appreciate it, then the shorties
could listen to both No Limit and BDP and appreciate each
for their own unique merits.

Peace, Flash

AlanPage wrote:
> Wow...what a surprise, those were actually the people I was talking about in my
> post.
>
> Peace,
>
> Spirit
> Spread Love/Amphibians
>
> The Amphibians' debut single "Lettuce (Entertain You)" b/w "Journey" will be
> available August 9th, on vinyl ($5) and cassettes ($3), add $2 for
> shipping/handling. E-mail me for more details...

--

Olskool74

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to

webm...@ohhla.com said:
>Then we agree.
>Doesn't remove the merit of my point though:
>too many fuckin people front on the hip-hop classics.

Where are you from? Who is fronting? If you are claiming that they are
fronting, what are you doing to educate them? All this online sh*t is good and
all, but most of the people who front probably aren't reading this, naw?

>There's no educational structure to bring up the next
>generation of hip-hop with the history of the past days
>and consequently we get all bent out of shape when all
>they want to listen to is No Limit and Puffy yet they
>call Rakim and BDP wack.

Yo, then what are you doing 'bout it, bout it?
Who is the "we" that is getting all bent out of shape? You're overgeneralizing
with this. Maybe the youngbucks you know dis KRS, but if you grew up in NYC,
the kids here (at least the young highschool age black ones I know) know all
about early BDP, etc. It's like their history.

Who is the "we" and what are you doing about it?



>If we taught them about it
>from the jump so they could appreciate it, then the shorties
>could listen to both No Limit and BDP and appreciate each
>for their own unique merits.

So, when do your classes start?

Olskool.


Nikol Hopkins

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
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angela wrote:
> Anyway...

>
> Do women fiend for new groundbreaking hiphop? Not many, but I think not
> many men do either. RMHH may give one a distorted view. Most men I know who
> listen and know hiphop don't actively search out new acts.
>
> Being a fiend for hiphop does not necessarily mean actively seeking out
> new acts who are dropping it. I fiend for the music, but not as actively
> as I have in the past. I now fiend for people's interactions with hiphop
> music: what it does to them, how it changes their views, how and if they
> feel they belong in the culture.
>
> When I have convos with my hiphop colleagues, this is what we discuss.
> Sure, a peripheral conversation might touch on a Mad Skillz or Mountain
> Brothers, we're always hype to have our hands on some fly tracks, but it's
> the movement of the culture *beyond* those tracks that entices me the most.


Danyel Smith. Isn't she the editor-in-chief?


Nikol Hopkins

:::supporting women in journalism:::

Steve 'Flash' Juon

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to Olskool74
http://www.ohhla.com/YFA_rakim.html#paid

Expect more lessons from OHHLA and Mtu...@aol.com coming next week.
We gonna SCHOOL y'all knuckleheads, especially those of y'all who
claim "olskool" yet don't know the first DAMN thing about Melle Mel,
Grandmaster Caz, and Kool Herc. Old school is NOT ninety-two and it's
NOT eighty-eight.

Peace, Flash

Olskool74 wrote:
> So, when do your classes start?
>
> Olskool.

--

Steve 'Flash' Juon

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Sep 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/17/98
to Maseo27
MtumeS and I have been planning this classics thing for weeks now.
That post was just the perfect excuse to get the ball rolling.

Maseo27 wrote:
> Maseo

BSE

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Sep 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/18/98
to
I make tapes for my girl, she asks for "just singing stuff" which means
that "the turntablist anthem" goes on as does "Travellin man" and tehn
after half a side I run out of non-"one more chance" tracks and resort
to touchy feely normal hip hop. So these tracks get a trojan horse type
break:

Nas - The message
Phi life ctpher - A time of chaos
De La - keepin the faith
Jungle Brothers - Good lookin out
Public Enemy - he got game
OC - Ma dukes

this is jsut on the lates one which has a side left to do, gonna try and
sneak some Siah and Yesh and some OK on :)

Peace, BSE.


----BSE----------------------------------------
"clyde gets cocked in my face" - O.C (In a voice over for a porn film)


__________________BSE hip hop__________________
_____________ http://www.bseuk.com ____________


Maseo27

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Sep 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/18/98
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>http://www.ohhla.com/YFA_rakim.html#paid
>
>Expect more lessons from OHHLA and Mtu...@aol.com coming next week.
>We gonna SCHOOL y'all knuckleheads, especially those of y'all who
>claim "olskool" yet don't know the first DAMN thing about Melle Mel,
>Grandmaster Caz, and Kool Herc. Old school is NOT ninety-two and it's
>NOT eighty-eight.
>
>Peace, Flash
>
>

Get off of it.
Maseo

"I've only been wrong once in my life: I once thought I was wrong, but I was
mistaken."--Troy Superstar.

"Its Never Personal, you know how it is."--Me.


ba...@home.com

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Sep 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/18/98
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In article <3600D489...@ohhla.com>,

webm...@ohhla.com wrote:
> Yeah. And a lot of fuckin people front.
> You think not? Trust me. Unless it's a hip-hop audience or it's
> a majority urban crowd with an average age of 25, nobody knows it.
> Sad times. The classics are all forgotten.
>
> The DJ can throw on "The Symphony" at a Common Sense show and everybody
> gets buck buck buck but if the DJ at your local club drops it they'll
> scream, "FUCK THAT SHIT PLAY SOME MASTER P FOOL!!!"

I think the response depends on how much exposure the city has had to hip-hop
in general. If hip-hop has a minor or newer following in the city, I don't
think the classics will be recognized. Even here in Vancouver, I'm surprised
sometimes. A DJ will put on some pre-90's joints and some heads will know
the joints. But they're always a bigger response for Puff and Master P.
Sick.


--
One Love,
Terry Malko

'A rich man is one with knowledge, happiness and his health'
--Com

-----== Posted via Deja News, The Leader in Internet Discussion ==-----
http://www.dejanews.com/rg_mkgrp.xp Create Your Own Free Member Forum

Richard D. Allen

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Sep 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/18/98
to
The most popular hip-hop act amongst hip white girls is
unquestionably De la Soul. You're right, they don't like the hard stuff
but throw on De la and they all go "I love this album!"

As for hip-hop females (I've never liked that term - "yo did you
check the females?" uh, you mean the women? It's an adjective not a noun)
I have met lots of them. These are people are actively involved in the
culture and have a background in it (i.e. not the hip white girls, God
love em). But they tend to be into the classics or artsy shit, not battle
rhymes or gangsterism.

Although it seems like punk rock white girls can appreciate
hardcore rap more than others. I know a lot of girls like that with
Wu-Tang albums.


--

Richard Allen

aug...@email.unc.edu


SpaceOrbit

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Sep 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/21/98
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tony1er contributed:

> how many ladie sdo you know that fiend for new
>groundbreaking hip hop? I don't know any. and I live in a big city where most
>girls I know like hip hop in one way or another.
>later tony

Hi! I'd like to introduce myself...

I'm about to bum some money offa my pops (tellin him it's "field trip money")
so that I can drive around over the weekend to get Black Star's LP (if I can
find it in Mickeytown, FL). I'm under the assumption that Rassassination is
going to be good, so if I can dig through the sofa cushions and scrounge for
some change, then perhaps that will make my buying list as well. Company Flow
gets a lot of play on my tape deck in my car, much more than Acey, in fact.

Not to say that I am strictly aggressive rap. Nah. I check De La about as
much as I check Wu-Tang. I have no real preference on what tone of Hip-Hop I
listen to, it's all on what mood I'm in.

Peace

NyceStylez
:::listening to Wu right now... 36 Chambers:::
-------
From the Infamous Miss NyceStylez
Subscribe to Hip-Hop's "News You Can Eat" nyces...@hotmail.com

--Straight Hip-Hop, fresh for '81, suckas!!--

"When I hear music, it makes me dance..." Debbie Deb

PEST1

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Sep 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM9/22/98
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