Even Cowboys Like A Little Rock N Roll (was Dixie Chicks)

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SinWagon01

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Sep 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/15/99
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Heath said:
It's great to make fun of the way people dress while picking their
pockets? The Chicks are a disgrace and an insult to anyone who leads a
western lifestyle, is a cowboy, or grew up on a farm. They're making a
mockery of real cow-folks like George Strait and Chris LeDoux, while
attempting to sell their product to the same audience. >>

You must be the guy who Chris LeDoux was talking about in a recent article I
read of his. He opened the show with ''Even Cowboys Like A Little Rock N
Roll'' and this Cowboy and his family got up and left in disgust. LOL Or
maybe you forgot about his song ''Long Haired Outlaw''. Maybe you forgot that
Chris teamed up with Jon Bon Jovi...or maybe you don't know his guitar trick he
got from Ace Frehley. Lighten up---because as Chris says....''Even Cowboys
Like A Little Rock N Roll''.

Heath Seremet

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Sep 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/16/99
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sinwagon01 wrote:
<<You must be the guy who Chris LeDoux was talking about in a recent
article I read of his. He opened the show with ''Even Cowboys Like A
Little Rock N Roll'' and this Cowboy and his family got up and left in
disgust. LOL   Or maybe you forgot about his song ''Long Haired
Outlaw''. Maybe you forgot that Chris teamed up with Jon Bon Jovi...or
maybe you don't know his guitar trick he got from Ace Frehley. Lighten
up---because as Chris says....''Even Cowboys Like A Little Rock N
Roll''.>>
----------------------------------------
Oh boy. You don't need to educate me about Chris LeDoux. I used to
drink beer with K.W. Turnbow. Any questions? Obviously, you haven't
read any of my earlier posts about LeDoux or how I feel about rock &
roll and country colliding, so I won't hold it against you. But you
completely missed my point about the Dixie Chicks. I was talking about
the way they dress. They wear big orange straw cowboy hats. They look
like a hip-hop group trying to be cowgirls. Better yet, they look like
Halloween costumes! The worst part is, they want people to think they
are the real deal. But it's an insult to those of us who wear Wranglers
and Justin boots and Resistol hats because we ARE the real deal, not
because we are playing "dress up."

-Heath
"I'm from the country.... and I like it that way!"


Dixie Chicks Fan

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Sep 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/16/99
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Hea...@webtv.net wrote:
>I was talking about
>the way they dress. They wear big orange straw cowboy hats. They look
>like a hip-hop group trying to be cowgirls. Better yet, they look like
>Halloween costumes! The worst part is, they want people to think they
>are the real deal. But it's an insult to those of us who wear Wranglers
>and Justin boots and Resistol hats because we ARE the real deal, not
>because we are playing "dress up."

I know I just jumped in the middle of a discussion so excuse me but I'm just
trying to clarify what I *think* you are saying.

It sounds like you are saying clothes makes the person? Are you saying that
anyone then can put on a pair of Wranglers, boots, and hat and "be country"?
Surely not....I must be misunderstanding your comments. That would be like
saying you have no clue about the internet because you use WebTv (cheesy orange
hat) instead of a PC (real hat - Resistol).

To email me, simply remove the "pose" at the end of my email address above.

Country Boy

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Sep 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/17/99
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Heath Seremet <Hea...@webtv.net> wrote in article
<1145-37...@newsd-621.iap.bryant.webtv.net>...


>>They wear big orange straw cowboy hats. They look
like a hip-hop group trying to be cowgirls. Better yet, they look like
Halloween costumes! The worst part is, they want people to think they
are the real deal. But it's an insult to those of us who wear Wranglers
and Justin boots and Resistol hats because we ARE the real deal, not
because we are playing "dress up."

---

I've seen them a bunch of times and I've never seen the hats you describe.
They're 20-somethings, and they dress like typical 20-somethings. Such as
that is. But the costume you describe (jeans, hat, and boots) sounds
better suited to a male act. I'm not sure I want my lady to come dressed
like a guy. Know what I mean?


thecoun...@my-deja.com

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Sep 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/17/99
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I was going to keep my mouth shut here, but this really went all over
me! I live in the south, I've listened to country music my whole life,
I have worked in the country music industry for 11 years, I could go on
and on. I would not EVER EVER EVER be caught dead in a pair of
Wranglers or cowboy boots. You cannot say that because these girls
don't dress like that that they are not country. What female singers
DO you consider country?? Off the top of my head I can only think of
one girl--Terri Clark--who even dresses remotely like that, and she's
from Canada for pete's sake! I don't think they're even TRYING to look
like cowgirls. They're just having fun.

And look at Emily and Martie. They play what I would consider COUNTRY
instruments: fiddle, mandolin, banjo. They've played them since they
were young. And I don't think Natalie has a voice for anything BUT
country music.

You can go drink your beer and wear your Wranglers and act like a
cowboy, but you cannot say because I would wear designer clothes
instead of Ropers that I am not country.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

countrymusicnz

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Sep 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/18/99
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I have a song that relates my thinking on this. The chorus...

"Out in the backcountry, where country is as country does, you don't need to
wear a hat out here, cause countries in your soul, it's not what you wear,
and you can't say you're country, if you aint been out here".

The point being, it doesn't matter a damn what you wear. if you are the real
deal you are regardless of your boots hats and jeans. I wear all of the
above, but when I'm not wearing them it doesn't effect who or what I am.


Country Boy <UDL...@prodigy.com> wrote in message
news:01bf00b2$863bade0$2316fed1@default...

Todd R. Brown

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Sep 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/21/99
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In article <1145-37...@newsd-621.iap.bryant.webtv.net>,
Hea...@webtv.net (Heath Seremet) wrote:

> sinwagon01 wrote:
> <<You must be the guy who Chris LeDoux was talking about in a recent
> article I read of his. He opened the show with ''Even Cowboys Like A
> Little Rock N Roll'' and this Cowboy and his family got up and left in

> disgust. LOL =A0 Or maybe you forgot about his song ''Long Haired


> Outlaw''. Maybe you forgot that Chris teamed up with Jon Bon Jovi...or
> maybe you don't know his guitar trick he got from Ace Frehley. Lighten
> up---because as Chris says....''Even Cowboys Like A Little Rock N
> Roll''.>>
> ----------------------------------------
> Oh boy. You don't need to educate me about Chris LeDoux. I used to
> drink beer with K.W. Turnbow. Any questions? Obviously, you haven't
> read any of my earlier posts about LeDoux or how I feel about rock &
> roll and country colliding, so I won't hold it against you. But you

> completely missed my point about the Dixie Chicks. I was talking about
> the way they dress. They wear big orange straw cowboy hats. They look


> like a hip-hop group trying to be cowgirls. Better yet, they look like
> Halloween costumes! The worst part is, they want people to think they
> are the real deal. But it's an insult to those of us who wear Wranglers
> and Justin boots and Resistol hats because we ARE the real deal, not
> because we are playing "dress up."
>

> -Heath
> "I'm from the country.... and I like it that way!"

Country and Rock colliding? They're practically the same thing anyway (at
least country transmuted into rock). Steve Earle, Jerry Lee Lewis, Son
Volt ...

Who cares what you wear? You don't have to put on a 10-gallon hat to
enjoy country music.

Heath Seremet

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Sep 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/21/99
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Again, I feel I must clarify my statements, as too many here have taken
what I said the wrong way. There were some great points made about how
the way you dress does not make you country. I never said a person had
to dress like George Strait to be considered country. Someone might
wear flannel shirts and work boots, or overalls, or sweats and a
t-shirt, etc. Normally I wouldn't judge a person for the way they
dress, but IMO, the Dixie Chicks make a mockery of people who are
cowboys and dress that way. For anyone who doesn't know what I'm
talking about when I say, "big, orange hats," look at the video for
"Wide Open Spaces." Now, let me make a comparison. There is an
exercise program on ESPN in which the instructers sometimes teach line
dancing as a work out. Normally they wear shorts, spandex, or whatever
you would normally wear to workout. When they do line dances, however,
they don cowboy hats and vests with sheriff's badges, along with their
shorts and sneakers. They look utterly ridiculous. If a person is not
comfortable wearing a certain kind of clothing, then why do they do it?
The Dixie Chicks, as accomplished country/bluegrass performers should
know better. I wouldn't care if they wore slacks and blouses or shorts
and t-shirts or whatever, but they look like they're making a really
poor attempt at dressing "country." Cowgirl clothes look as out of
place on the Chicks as those sheriff's badges and cowboy hats look on
the aerobics instructors on ESPN. I feel that it represents country
music in a very poor way, as in if we can't take ourselves and our own
culture seriously, then how can we expect the rest our the world to take
us seriously. Maybe I'm being too sensitive about this, or maybe I've
had one too many people judge me because I do wear Wranglers and boots
and a Resistol hat and it's just rubbed off. I just feel that when the
Chick's wear their make believe cowgirl type clothes that they're
insulting those who are the real deal, sort of like if a cowboy-type
decided to do gangsta rap and wore gold chains like Mr. T and a big
clock around their neck like Flavo Flav. No doubt the rap comunity
wouldn't espect them. Remember Vanilla Ice? I guess I would call the
Dixie Chicks the Vanilla Ice of country music. I hope ya'll get my
point.

-Heath
"I'm from the country.... and I like it that way!"

CMA stands for Country My A$$!


SinginCJ

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Sep 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/21/99
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Heath,
I get your point and I thinkn you're blowing this WAY out of proportion.
I really have to address this comment here:

> I feel that it represents country
>music in a very poor way, as in if we can't >take ourselves and our own
>culture seriously, then how can we expect >the rest our the world to take
>us seriously.

There's nothing worse for a culture than when they start to take themselves too
seriously. You start going crazy because every little thing that's said about
you is taken as an attack o some sort. Have a little humor.

>but they look like they're making a really
>poor attempt at dressing "country." >Cowgirl clothes look as out of
>place on the Chicks as

<SNIP>

The Chicks are dressing how they want to dress. I think that's great. They're
country, they're good, they can wear what they want. Are you proposing a dress
code?
CJ

Clark Reid

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Sep 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/22/99
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On reading your clarification heath i agree with you 100%

Cheers

Clark.
At a bar I used to play at a guy there used to wear a sherrifs badge and the
rest of his "garb" was pure "old west". I always asked him if he thought it
was a "FANCY DRESS" party. That's the associated philosophy. I too found it
insulting to those of us who wore a hat and boots etc as part of an
associated culture.

Clark Reid
"Country aint what sing, it's what I am".
www.hi-tek.net/clark


Heath Seremet <Hea...@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:18242-37...@newsd-622.iap.bryant.webtv.net...


> Again, I feel I must clarify my statements, as too many here have taken
> what I said the wrong way. There were some great points made about how
> the way you dress does not make you country. I never said a person had
> to dress like George Strait to be considered country. Someone might
> wear flannel shirts and work boots, or overalls, or sweats and a
> t-shirt, etc. Normally I wouldn't judge a person for the way they
> dress, but IMO, the Dixie Chicks make a mockery of people who are
> cowboys and dress that way. For anyone who doesn't know what I'm
> talking about when I say, "big, orange hats," look at the video for
> "Wide Open Spaces." Now, let me make a comparison. There is an
> exercise program on ESPN in which the instructers sometimes teach line
> dancing as a work out. Normally they wear shorts, spandex, or whatever
> you would normally wear to workout. When they do line dances, however,
> they don cowboy hats and vests with sheriff's badges, along with their
> shorts and sneakers. They look utterly ridiculous. If a person is not
> comfortable wearing a certain kind of clothing, then why do they do it?
> The Dixie Chicks, as accomplished country/bluegrass performers should
> know better. I wouldn't care if they wore slacks and blouses or shorts

> and t-shirts or whatever, but they look like they're making a really


> poor attempt at dressing "country." Cowgirl clothes look as out of

> place on the Chicks as those sheriff's badges and cowboy hats look on

> the aerobics instructors on ESPN. I feel that it represents country


> music in a very poor way, as in if we can't take ourselves and our own
> culture seriously, then how can we expect the rest our the world to take

Clark Reid

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Sep 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/22/99
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I don't think it's a case of a drss code. I agree it's important to be able
to laugh at yourself too. I also think there's a self respect issue. There
is a line that can be crossed. I don't know if the line has been crossed in
the Chicks case. I think they're great. But it's important to remember there
is a line and to be aware of it. The same in the music itself.


SinginCJ <sing...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:19990921110548...@ng-cj1.aol.com...


> Heath,
> I get your point and I thinkn you're blowing this WAY out of
proportion.
> I really have to address this comment here:
>

> > I feel that it represents country
> >music in a very poor way, as in if we can't >take ourselves and our own
> >culture seriously, then how can we expect >the rest our the world to take
> >us seriously.
>

> There's nothing worse for a culture than when they start to take
themselves too
> seriously. You start going crazy because every little thing that's said
about
> you is taken as an attack o some sort. Have a little humor.
>

> >but they look like they're making a really
> >poor attempt at dressing "country." >Cowgirl clothes look as out of
> >place on the Chicks as

Buck Johnson

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Sep 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/22/99
to
Heath Seremet wrote:
> Maybe I'm being too sensitive about this, or maybe I've
> had one too many people judge me because I do wear Wranglers and boots
> and a Resistol hat and it's just rubbed off. I just feel that when the
> Chick's wear their make believe cowgirl type clothes that they're
> insulting those who are the real deal,

In the words of Terry Allen (from "Amarillo Highway"):

Well I don't wear no Stetson
But I'm willin' to bet son
That I'm as big a Texan as you are

Anybody but the Chicks and I probably would have ignored your comments,
Heath,
but for years they were a real-deal struggling group. Amazing the price
of a
little success. I think your sensitivities are focused in the wrong
direction, especially in the case of artists and their creative videos.

Buck

XG

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Sep 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/23/99
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Brent C <nos...@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:67937B738B0C2011.F286DE03...@lp.airnews.net...

Anyone who was that fly wouldn't give two ghetto passes what the rap
community thought. Besides, I think you better go pick up last month's
Rolling Stone and check out the Kid Rock pictures. Your country-rap
superhero pimp may be more of a reality than you know. Ever heard of
hick-hop?
>

giggles...nope but at least now i know it's been named!!!ROFL i love it hick
hop...and i love kid rock too you are so right he is pretty close to a
country-rap-more rock rap maybe?-but close....ROFLMFAO!!!

><snip>As for my boy Vanilla Ice, he's a living legend, with the highest
selling (20 million copies) rap album of all time. I know you think his new
hardcore punk band is a silly idea and all, but now that Ice and his wife
have a little baby girl (Dusty Rain), he's all settled down. I think he
should record a folky hip hop album, something like Everlast.


> >"I'm from the country.... and I like it that way!"

hey i thoughti heard not too long ago he had something in the works?!?!?!?!?
(vanilla ice that is)

> Well I be from the concrete jungle...Htown, Texas, and I wouldn't have it
any other way. But I sure love cows.


yeah they're cute but i dont eat em-LOL

anjel

--
******************************************************
http://www.geocities.com/heartland/fields/6766
Have you registered? http://findme.org
what's up in texas? ---->http://www.txcare.org
Do you have your non-i.d.??
****************************************************
If it's not fun it ain't worth doing!
*******************************************************

> >CMA stands for Country My A$$!
>

> Cash Money Association?

J.B.

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Sep 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/24/99
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> Besides, I think you better go pick up last month's
>Rolling Stone and check out the Kid Rock pictures. Your country-rap
>superhero pimp may be more of a reality than you know. Ever heard of
>hick-hop?

In all seriousness, I understand that Kid Rock is employing pedal steel
guitarist Lynn Owsley, formerly of the Texas Troubadours, on the road.
No, I am not kidding.
I haven't had a chance to hear rapper Kid Rock yet. But I am familiar with the
Troubadours. *grin*
-JB


Busgal58jb

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Sep 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/25/99
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>>In all seriousness, I understand that Kid Rock is employing pedal steel
>>guitarist Lynn Owsley, formerly of the Texas Troubadours, on the road.
>> No, I am not kidding.
>>I haven't had a chance to hear rapper Kid Rock yet. But I am familiar with
>the
>>Troubadours. *grin*
Lynn was talking about his tours over in the Steel Gutair Forum
BUS
busgaljan 's Home Page http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/3886/index.html
favorete artests
http://www.dalewatson.realcountry.net/index.html
http://br5-49convoy.com/
http://cornellhurdband.com

James Michael Randorff

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Sep 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/25/99
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In article <37E8BF47...@ix.netcom.com>, Buck Johnson <bu...@ix.netcom.com>
writes:

>Anybody but the Chicks and I probably would have ignored your comments,
>Heath, but for years they were a real-deal struggling group. Amazing the
price
>of a little success. I think your sensitivities are focused in the wrong
>direction, especially in the case of artists and their creative videos.

Well... two of the current three have paid their dues as a real-deal
struggling group.

Later,
~~ James Michael Randorff (jran...@aol.com)
~~ http://hometown.aol.com/jrandorff/index.html

"Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world... she walks into
mine." -- The late, great, Humphrey Bogart, from "Casablanca"

Soccer Hooligan

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Sep 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/25/99
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James Michael Randorff <jran...@aol.compliment> wrote in message
news:19990925041548...@ngol04.aol.com...

You are right. It was no "overnight success". They slugged it out in Texas
for years.

James Michael Randorff

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Sep 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/28/99
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In article <dbcH3.2671$yc1....@news1.atl>, "Soccer Hooligan"
<afc...@post.co.uk> writes:

>> Well... two of the current three have paid their dues as a real-deal
>> struggling group.
>

>You are right. It was no "overnight success". They slugged it out in Texas
>for years.

Again, I say, two of the current three slugged it out in Texas for years, and
aren't "overnight successes."

Buck Johnson

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Sep 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/28/99
to
James Michael Randorff wrote:
>
> Again, I say, two of the current three slugged it out in Texas for years, and
> aren't "overnight successes."

Hey James, wasn't Natalie's daddy a pretty big steel man from
way-up-north
Texas? Do you know what kinda roots she has, or maybe how long she's
been
working in music, apart from when she joined the Chicks? Just curious.

Buck

James Michael Randorff

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Sep 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM9/29/99
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In article <37F0902A...@ix.netcom.com>, Buck Johnson
<bu...@ix.netcom.com> writes:

>Hey James, wasn't Natalie's daddy a pretty big steel man from way-up-north
>Texas? Do you know what kinda roots she has, or maybe how long she's
>been working in music, apart from when she joined the Chicks? Just curious.

Buck,
Yes, Lloyd Maines (Natalie's father) is an amazing pedal steel player, and
producer (not to mention that he plays just about every other stringed
instrument known to man) from West Texas (Lubbock, to be precise). Lloyd has
now moved to Austin and is producing quite a few Texas musicians and bands. As
for Natalie, while her father was quite the country picker, her roots are in
rock, pop, R&B, and metal, and she never really had any use for country
whatsoever. Lloyd had been working with the Chicks for their second and third
albums (Little Ol' Cowgirl and Shouldn't a Told You That), so he was already in
with Emily and Martie. When he found out that Laura Lynch and the Erwin
sisters were parting ways, the Erwin sisters already knew about Natalie, and
what a talent she was (hey, I may not be too fond of her, but I'd be an idiot
to try and discount her talent), and Natalie ended up joining the group.
Shortly after, they started working on a deal with Sony, and BOOM, Natalie is a
major label Dixie Chick. Amazing what a paying gig will do to your outlook on
life and music, eh? :)

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