WNCN-FM New York "Eine Kliene"

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Jeremy

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Jan 28, 2004, 10:38:28 AM1/28/04
to
My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in New York
City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and 70s.
"Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by the
Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening signature
theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
Nachnmusik."

I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were listeners back
then.

Might anyone know what specific recording he used? It was probably
monophonic, and my recollection was that is was a small chanber ensemble,
not a full orchestral version.

Just for nostalgia's sake, I'd like to obtain a copy if it is still in
print. If anyone remembers the show please post the recording information.
Thanks.

--
Unfortunately nobody can control the disruptive behavior of sociopaths who
wish to post to an unmoderated newsgroup such as this one. Informed readers,
however, will have no trouble at all sorting the wheat from the chaff.


ajb723

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Jan 28, 2004, 3:59:50 PM1/28/04
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> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and 70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
> Nachnmusik."
>
> I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were listeners back
> then.
>
> Might anyone know what specific recording he used? It was probably
> monophonic, and my recollection was that is was a small chanber ensemble,
> not a full orchestral version.
>
> Just for nostalgia's sake, I'd like to obtain a copy if it is still in
> print. If anyone remembers the show please post the recording information.
> Thanks.
>
>

While we're on the subject of WNCN, did anyone catch the obit of a former
NCN announcer- Fleetwood?
--
Alan

B. A. Nilsson

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Jan 28, 2004, 5:53:31 PM1/28/04
to
I can't tell you which "Eine Kleine" recording Bill Watson used, but I
also recall that he opened with a spoken quote from "The Merchant of
Venice," part of the text Vaughan Williams set.

Watson was a cantankerous, opinionated fellow who would as soon play
several hours of Gieseking or Bjoerling recordings as talk -- but when
he talked, he was hard to shut up. He went from WQXR to WNCN to WBAI,
and at the last-named he indulged in marathon reading sessions, from
"Remembrance of Things Past" to "Alan Mendelsohn, Boy from Mars."

-- Byron

Jeremy

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Jan 28, 2004, 10:18:34 PM1/28/04
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"B. A. Nilsson" <by...@nospamforbanilsson.com> wrote in message
news:L3XRb.60650$Fe1....@twister.nyroc.rr.com...

> I can't tell you which "Eine Kleine" recording Bill Watson used, but I
> also recall that he opened with a spoken quote from "The Merchant of
> Venice," part of the text Vaughan Williams set.
>

Opening Reading: "Here will we sit and let the sounds of music creep into
our ears. Soft stillness, and the night, become the touches of sweet
harmony."

Closing reading: "Jean Jaques, Jean Pierre, awake to music in the air!"


Marc Perman

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Jan 28, 2004, 11:26:21 PM1/28/04
to

"Jeremy" <jer...@nospam.thanks.com> wrote in message
news:UHQRb.292$GO6...@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...

> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM
in New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and
70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored
by the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His
opening signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine
Kleine
> Nachnmusik."
>
> I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were
listeners back
> then.

Ah, WNCN. Its transition to rock was abrupt and harsh. It's now
Q-104, a classic rock station, and I admit that I do listen
sometimes. My favorite NY rock station, WLIR, inexplicably
switched to a Spanish language salsa station a couple of weeks
ago.

Marc PErman


Bill McCutcheon

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Jan 28, 2004, 11:41:16 PM1/28/04
to

"Jeremy" <jer...@nospam.thanks.com> wrote in message
news:UHQRb.292$GO6...@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in
New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and
70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by
the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening
signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
> Nachnmusik."
>
> I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were listeners
back
> then.
>
> Might anyone know what specific recording he used? It was probably
> monophonic, and my recollection was that is was a small chanber
ensemble,
> not a full orchestral version.
>
> Just for nostalgia's sake, I'd like to obtain a copy if it is still
in
> print. If anyone remembers the show please post the recording
information.
> Thanks.
>
Sorry, I can't help with your quest nor do I remember Mr. Watson.
What I recall from NY is a classical station, based on Long Island
IIRC, with "Charles Duvall, your continental host," said with a heavy
(possibly fake?) French accent. Does anyone else recall that and
remember the call letters or the frequency of that station?
-- Bill McC.


Digiti

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Jan 29, 2004, 2:35:38 PM1/29/04
to
The Lake Success station was WTFM one of the first full time stereo
multiplex stations in the city. Do you remember Michael Botula[spelling?]one
of their first DJs?
R.Q.

"Bill McCutcheon" <wjm...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:M90Sb.1086$GO6...@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...

Bill McCutcheon

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Jan 29, 2004, 6:14:47 PM1/29/04
to

"Digiti" <dig...@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:egdSb.282539$0P1....@twister.nyc.rr.com...

> The Lake Success station was WTFM one of the first full time stereo
> multiplex stations in the city. Do you remember Michael
Botula[spelling?]one
> of their first DJs?
> R.Q.
>
>
WTFM ... that sounds familiar and the timing is about right, indeed
about the time that FM stereo was the latest and greatest in radio
broadcasting. I don't recall Botula although, truth be told, I was
only an occasional listener to classical at that time. I was more
into Cousin Brucie and Murray the K at that time; my heavy-duty
interest in classical came considerably later. Thanks for the memory
jogger!
-- Bill McC.


michae...@gmail.com

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Feb 3, 2014, 11:36:56 PM2/3/14
to
I looked forward to Bill Watson's smooth and pleasant voice every night for years when he was at his peak. That is when most of us remember him and his fine selections of classical music. Late at night, all night long, or when we opened our eye in the morning and he was still there. A small string group of any kind would be enough nostalgia for me. Of further note was that I had a musical cuckoo clock that played Eine Kleine Nachtmusic on the hour.

cmar...@gmail.com

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May 5, 2014, 1:43:33 PM5/5/14
to
On Wednesday, January 28, 2004 10:38:29 AM UTC-5, Jeremy wrote:

arri bachrach

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May 5, 2014, 9:28:24 PM5/5/14
to
I listened to the program for years and also heard the last day of broadcast. there was no warning or advance notice. 104.3 FM was converted into some kind of Spanish music station which I beliveve still exists.

AB

li...@mtnlion.com

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Dec 2, 2014, 3:39:32 PM12/2/14
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I produced his American Airlines show and we used the Music Heritage Society version. He was cantankerous and paranoid as hell, but he was great fun to know and became a good friend.

fritz...@gmail.com

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Jan 2, 2015, 8:52:26 PM1/2/15
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My middle school daughter plays flute, and as we live near Ann Arbor, I thought the UofM would have student recitals. So a quick search shows the head of the flute department is an woman named Amy Porter and among the pieces she has posted on youtube is a sonatine by Geiseking. Huh? the pianist? wrote flute music?
I first heard of Mr Geiseking on wncn when Mr. Watson on his late night program explained how some listener had, as a memorial to a loved one, presented the station with a set of discs which were previously unplayed. I don't remember what pieces the recordings were of, but I do remember Mr. Watson reading the dedication on several occasions when he played the recordings.
Late night radio for me in the sixties consisted of Jean Shepard on wor, then "Listening with Watson" on wncn, the la la land.
When wncn first tried to go to pop music there was a great noise made and the classical format was 'saved' for a while. Then, without much fuss or anything, it one night went pop. Mr. Watson had already left the station, I think, due to the strength of his personality.

m41...@gmail.com

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Jan 4, 2015, 11:45:31 PM1/4/15
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2004 2:53:43 PM UTC-8, B. A. Nilsson wrote:
On Wednesday, January 28, 2004 2:53:43 PM UTC-8, B. A. Nilsson wrote:
I was delighted to see all these post about Bill Watson, my favorite radio host of all time. He was special, wonderful and often weird.

I have fond memories of him playing recordings of Scarlatti sonatas interspersed with readings from Henry James.

I remember when, late in his career, WNCN insisted that he do hourly news summaries. After a lengthy tirade -- the gist being that there were 50 other stations on the dial doing hourly news and that you, as an American citizen, were entirely within your rights to rotate the dial -- he started doing an hourly news report. The startling thing was then when he read news dispatches from the Vietnamese War he would often intersperse them with unintroduced readings from Caesar's Gallic Wars. I think the point was: Plus ca change.....

But the thing I remember most from Bill was the night he played Klemperer's recording of Bach's St. Matthew Passion -- certainly one of the longest ever made. As the final notes died away, Watson came on, exclaimed with relish "That was good, let's play it again!." And so he did another few hours of Klemperer at his most stately speed.

I thought that was great and highly unusual programming and I remember him doing the same thing with, I think, Die Meistersinger. But years later I met someone who knew him. He said Bill often entertained young ladies in the studio at night and sometimes he got sidetracked and didn't have time to look for something new to play. Hearsay, of course, but I would not be surprised if it were true.

Martin Cohn

Norman Schwartz

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Jan 5, 2015, 9:58:10 AM1/5/15
to
fritz...@gmail.com wrote:
> made and the classical format was 'saved' for a while. Then, without
> much fuss or anything, it one night went pop.

I used to receive WNCN's monthly program guide and IIRC something went
strange regarding my renewal subscription to its future issues, so I had a
good idea about that which was about to happen. The "pop" that bugged the
hell out of me, although adequately forewarned, was when the so-called
'Radio Station of the New York Times' (WQXR AM/FM) sold its assigned FM
frequency (96.3) to a Spanish pop music station. Of course we know it came
back into existence as WQXR.org with many of the same announcers and
available on the internet and over the air at the end of the dial (105.9 FM)
at greatly reduced signal strength. I've held that against the New York
Times to this very day.


cooper...@gmail.com

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Jan 5, 2015, 2:23:17 PM1/5/15
to
I'll ditto Norman's comments about WQXR, noting also the banality of most of the programming. (Handel's "Water Music" and a Vivaldi Mandolin Concerto while I was exercising this AM.) We just survived another turning-of-the-year "Top 100" by turning off the radio. WQXR's partner station, WNYC, had good classical music every afternoon pre-9/11. After their transmitter went down they launched a fundraising campaign, promising to rebuild and restore things to the way they were. Then they eliminated the afternoon music in favor all-talk.

There was so much classical music on FM in the NYC area back in the day! I wonder if I'm the only one here who remembers the glory days of WDHA out in Dover, NJ (!)--a pioneer in stereo broadcasting, featuring 18 solid hours of classical music every day (http://doverhistoricalsociety.com/files/pages/radiohistory/radiohistory1.htm). And today? See http://www.wdhafm.com/. Sic transit & all that. But enough: time to think cheery thoughts.

AC

Steve de Mena

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Jan 5, 2015, 3:20:13 PM1/5/15
to
On 1/4/15, 11:45 PM, m41...@gmail.com wrote:

>
> I was delighted to see all these post about Bill Watson, my favorite radio host of all time. He was special, wonderful and often weird.
>
> I have fond memories of him playing recordings of Scarlatti sonatas interspersed with readings from Henry James.
>
> I remember when, late in his career, WNCN insisted that he do hourly news summaries. After a lengthy tirade -- the gist being that there were 50 other stations on the dial doing hourly news and that you, as an American citizen, were entirely within your rights to rotate the dial -- he started doing an hourly news report.

The rationale behind a classical music station doing briefly hourly
news updates is not that there aren't other stations with news, but
that if a listener tunes away for some news they'll likely stay tuned
to that news station and not come back. Or not come back within 5-10
minutes.

Steve

Terry

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Jan 6, 2015, 9:21:33 AM1/6/15
to
On Thursday, 29 January 2004 02:38:29 UTC+11, Jeremy wrote:
> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and 70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
> Nachnmusik."
>
> I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were listeners back
> then.
>
> Might anyone know what specific recording he used? It was probably
> monophonic, and my recollection was that is was a small chanber ensemble,
> not a full orchestral version.
>
> Just for nostalgia's sake, I'd like to obtain a copy if it is still in
> print. If anyone remembers the show please post the recording information.
> Thanks.
>

Check this out:

http://tinyurl.com/molxs25

Norman Schwartz

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Jan 6, 2015, 12:47:10 PM1/6/15
to
cooper...@gmail.com wrote:

WNYC, had good classical music every
> afternoon pre-9/11. After their transmitter went down they launched
> a fundraising campaign, promising to rebuild and restore things to
> the way they were. Then they eliminated the afternoon music in favor
> all-talk.
>

My experience with WNYC originated about 65 years ago. My parents received a
copy of their program guide listing composers with dates and times their
compositions would be aired, and it was free for the asking. In fact I
recall my mom going through the guide upon receiving it marking a wall
calendar accordingly. (That calendar from the 'Corn Exchange Bank' was also
free and readily available at their branches.) Eventually WNYC charged some
nominal fee for their schedule, but we got it anway, as well as the one from
'The Radio Station of the NY Times'.

It was Dick Sequerra (of audio fame)
http://www.sequerra.com/common/data/whois.html who was largely responsible
for putting WNCN on the air, as well as having monitored and improved its
signal. ".1976: Conceived and designed complete FM Radio Station WNCN in New
York. Designed special test equipment to measure FM Performance off the air.
(He was also involved in the design of the Marantz 10B and Sequerra Model FM
tuners.)

> AC


mrjpw...@gmail.com

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Jan 23, 2015, 9:47:33 PM1/23/15
to
Jeremy,

He used: Collectors Series (mono only) MOZART: EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSIK, K 525/A MUSICAL JOKE, K.522 VIENNA KONZERTHAUS QUARTET Josef Hermann, double bass/Hans Berger, 1st horn/Josef Koller, 2nd horn (Westminister ABC Records W-9035) (18292)

Sincerely,

Jean-Pierre Watson

THANK YOU FOR BEING A LISTENER!

cooper...@gmail.com

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Jan 24, 2015, 11:48:12 AM1/24/15
to
Thanks for that nostalgia-inducing information, Jean-Pierre. This recording of EKM was reissued on CD7 of the 59-disc(!) Westminster Legacy, vol. 1; Ein Musikalischer Spass is on CD11. Charming old-fashioned performances.

AC

arri bachrach

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Jan 24, 2015, 1:22:38 PM1/24/15
to
I would love to hear Watson's voice again...... I listenend to that station from the beginning till the end.

AB

wade

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Jan 24, 2015, 3:31:58 PM1/24/15
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I remember listening to his program. I recall often he would play ocean sounds under his readings. I recall that his show was my first exposure to the 1965 Munich recording of Meistersinger. Great speaking voice, but nowhere near as sexy sounding as Jim Svejda, the Barry White of classical radio.

Andrew Clarke

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Jan 24, 2015, 6:21:25 PM1/24/15
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On Thursday, January 29, 2004 at 2:38:29 AM UTC+11, Jeremy wrote:
> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and 70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
> Nachnmusik."

Was Eine Kliene Nachtmusik (in the subject line) recorded by Leonard Bernstien and Bruce Springstien?

I'm interested in why in America, Jewish names in -ein are sometimes pronounced to rhyme with "seen" instead of "brine".

Has this pronunciation been adopted

(a) to sound less Jewish and more Anglo (c.f. Murray for Moishe and Shirley for Sarah)
(b) to sound less German (understandably since 1933)
(c) because non-Jewish and non-German Americans usually pronounced it to rhyme with "seen" anyway?
(d) some other reason?

BTW is Mr Klein pronounced Mister Clean?

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

Jerry

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Jan 24, 2015, 10:34:22 PM1/24/15
to
Andrew,

I had always assumed that the INE is the expected pronunciation in German while
the EEN is based on Yiddish pronunciation of the same letter combination. Since
I do not know any Yiddish, I would be interested in any other opinions on your
question.

As for German, I am sad to report that too many of my countrymen cannot
handle German pronunciation or spelling.

Jerry

John Wiser

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Jan 24, 2015, 11:15:10 PM1/24/15
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"Jerry" <gpge...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:16de2d24-d9de-40b6...@googlegroups.com...
Not to mention English.

jdw

Andrew Clarke

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Jan 25, 2015, 12:00:30 AM1/25/15
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Jeremy, from what I can gather on the web, there are 2 different Yiddish pronunciations of -ei- (or "bifurcation" if you want to sound impressive!).

In some Yiddish words the modern German [ai] sound is used, but in others, it's [ei] pronounced as in "day". Neither give long [i]. It's all to do with the evolution of Middle High German.

But of course Standard Yiddish is a 20th century invention, so there were possible dialectal differences.

I must write to my old high school friend who is about to retire from teaching pure maths in Haifa, and who started learning Yiddish in middle age in memory of his late parents whom he could remember speaking Yiddish to each other in Melbourne, Australia, when he was very young child.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

Herman

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Jan 25, 2015, 2:49:02 AM1/25/15
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I doubt the "Kliene" in the subject line is misspelled due to pronounciation issues.

Many Americans will misspell such words no matter what.

Andrew Clarke

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Jan 25, 2015, 5:16:58 AM1/25/15
to
On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 6:49:02 PM UTC+11, Herman wrote:
> I doubt the "Kliene" in the subject line is misspelled due to pronounciation issues.
>
> Many Americans will misspell such words no matter what.

Slip of the keyboard in Jeremy's case, because he spells it correctly in the body of the entry,

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

Francis Fisher

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Feb 4, 2015, 11:27:01 PM2/4/15
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2004 at 3:59:54 PM UTC-5, ajb723 wrote:
......
> While we're on the subject of WNCN, did anyone catch the obit of a former
> NCN announcer- Fleetwood?
> --
> Alan

Fleetwood was a staff announcer at NBC when I met him in the late 60s. I was a radio engineer. He was a good guy that everyone liked and he always put a smile on your face. We knew him as Harry although he never used his first name on air.

I worked the overnight in radio master control for a couple of yrs and often listened to Listening with Watson on WQXR. He was my primary mentor for classical music. During those years he limited the music he played to Bach, Beethoven and Mozart saying that was enough for anyone. I left the city in 1972 and I'm curious to know if Watson expanded beyond the three. I've added Chopin to the list.

Fleetwood -- Harry -- was a vocal music fan. I think he and I left NBC at about the same time and I never heard his show on NCN. I've wondered if he was able to play his vocal music.

This is an old thread ...so what, I'm an old guy and I've just come across it after reading Watson's NY Times obit. Guess I'll look for Harry's.

preparato...@gmail.com

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Jun 21, 2015, 9:21:14 PM6/21/15
to
Dear Jean-Pierre Watson,

I met you (and your brother) as a tiny boy in the spring of 1964. Here's how it happened:

As a 16-year-old habitual listener to Bill Watson's free-form overnight program, I was compelled to call him one night from suburban New Jersey to express my appreciation. He invited me to drop in, which I did that very night (what an adventure getting there!). He was a most gracious host: he generously played a few tracks from LPs I brought with me and invited me to announce them on the air. When the show was over he offered to drive me home. When I told him I lived in Hackensack, he said he did too and invited me to breakfast at his home (totally unannounced, I think) with your lovely maman and you and your brother. Then I understood his nightly sign-off to his sons. As a fatherless kid I was charmed out of my mind! Then he drove me the mile to my home. A treasured memory from my youth.

After professional education and training in Europe, I am a long-time working classical musician in New York. Bill Watson was a positive, formative influence. My LP copy of that precise recording of his signature music has a place of honor at home.

I hope your life has been happy too.

With very best wishes,
Tony Piccolo
preparato...@gmail.com

cepro...@gmail.com

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Jul 22, 2015, 12:23:08 PM7/22/15
to
Hello!
I had the morning drive show on WNCN from 1968 to 1971 and had a lot of contact with Bill. I have no idea what recording he used for Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. If you'd like to read my recollections of those days, including about Bill, you might want to take a look at my on-going memoir: http://stationbreaksbygordonspencer2.blogspot.com/
You'll need to scroll way down to the "WBAI and WNCN" section starting with "In early 1968..."
Here will we sit.
Gordon Spencer

lipit...@gmail.com

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Dec 31, 2015, 7:55:57 PM12/31/15
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Here it is NY Eve 2015 and I find myself missing Bill Watson. I used to call in and talk to him. I totally loved his ornery eccentricity. I wish he was still with us. I wish there was a recording of one his shows somewhere. I loved his voice and taste in music.

AB

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Dec 31, 2015, 9:30:56 PM12/31/15
to
On Thursday, December 31, 2015 at 7:55:57 PM UTC-5, lipit...@gmail.com wrote:
> Here it is NY Eve 2015 and I find myself missing Bill Watson. I used to call in and talk to him. I totally loved his ornery eccentricity. I wish he was still with us. I wish there was a recording of one his shows somewhere. I loved his voice and taste in music.

yes, that brings back memories for me also. I got a kick out of his voice but he really did not know much about music (but who cared)?

AB

itchk...@gmail.com

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Jul 11, 2016, 1:13:23 AM7/11/16
to
On Wednesday, January 28, 2004 at 10:38:28 AM UTC-5, Jeremy wrote:
> My introduction to the world of classical music came via WNCN-FM in New York
> City, a 24-hour commercial classical station back in the 60s and 70s.
> "Classical DJ" Bill Watson did an all-night program, sponsored by the
> Cattlemen Restaurant, called "Listening With Watson." His opening signature
> theme every night was the second movement of Mozart's "Eine Kleine
> Nachnmusik."
>
> I'm thinking that there may be others on this NG that were listeners back
> then.
>
> Might anyone know what specific recording he used? It was probably
> monophonic, and my recollection was that is was a small chanber ensemble,
> not a full orchestral version.
>
> Just for nostalgia's sake, I'd like to obtain a copy if it is still in
> print. If anyone remembers the show please post the recording information.
> Thanks.
>
>
>
> --
> Unfortunately nobody can control the disruptive behavior of sociopaths who
> wish to post to an unmoderated newsgroup such as this one. Informed readers,
> however, will have no trouble at all sorting the wheat from the chaff.

Watson started his reading of The Willows by Algernon Blackwood by playing Smetana's The Moldau which hooked me for the rest of the night as I drove my cab around Manhattan. I couldn't bear to speak anymore than necessary with my passengers as he read, and I remember the consternation I felt when getting back to my own car's radio that I'd missed the ending while cashing in at the garage. I have since read and enjoyed The Willows, but it was missing something and that was Bill Watson and Bedric Smetana.

m41...@gmail.com

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Jul 11, 2016, 2:00:38 AM7/11/16
to
I was just telling a friend about Bill Watson the other day at lunch. Specifically, when he did the night shift on WNCN and would do weird and wonderful things, such as play the complete St. Matthew Passion two times in a row. At the final chord, Bill would come on and say "That was great, let's do it again." And this wasn't just any recording of the St. Matthew, it was Klemperer's which, as I remember, may be the slowest ever recorded.

If memory serves, I think one night he did Die Meistersinger twice in a row. Years later I met someone who said they worked with Bill and that he often entertained young ladies in the studio and didn't have time to choose something else to play. Of course, this is hearsay and may be total BS.

I think my favorite thing he did was to read Henry James and break it up with Scarlatti sonatas on the piano. Near the end of Bill's tenure, when they insisted he do the news, he would often weave in paragraphs or even pages from Caesar's Gallic Wars. The point? I think it was that nothing had really changed in 2,000 years!

Martin

Mort

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Jul 11, 2016, 10:57:41 AM7/11/16
to
WQXR-FM has a mirror transmitter in Ossining, New York, which gives a
good signal here in northern Westchester County. Before that, the signal
from NYC on the new frequency was miserable.

Mort Linder

Mort

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Jul 11, 2016, 2:45:32 PM7/11/16
to
Years ago, during the Cold War, I managed with great difficulty to
secure from Poland a recording of a Cantor from my Dad's home town of
Lemberg, latterly Lviv,, singing Jewish folk songs. I invited my parents
to my apartment and with great joy and pride, started to play that 10"
LP. My Dad heard about 30 seconds of it, then stomped out of the room
saying "Galitz". In Eastern Europe, there were 2 Yiddish dialects:
Galician and Lithuanian = Litvak. For the word fleisch = meat, my Dad
said the word to rhyme with rice. My Mom said it to rhyme with the word
face. It was ludicrous, really, yet they fought over these things. The
Galician pronunciation parallels that of German, of course.

Hitler solved that problem in his own gruesome way.

Mort Linder


ang...@gmail.com

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Aug 27, 2016, 8:18:33 PM8/27/16
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anders...@gmail.com

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Dec 25, 2016, 10:36:26 PM12/25/16
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jass....@yahoo.com

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Mar 24, 2018, 12:21:49 AM3/24/18
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In trying to read something about my boyhood classical music idol Bill Watson, I was delighted to read a post from his son. I was introduced to the show by a professional musician who said your father knew more about classical music than anyone else on the air. I would love to know if there is a recording available of his sign on - including his reading
Dan Jass

hirschfe...@gmail.com

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Jun 5, 2019, 6:36:13 AM6/5/19
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Does anyone have a recording of the radio transcript of Watson doing his show? If anyone does I would love to see it posted on YouTube. I especially remember hearing him the night that he got fired because he read the poem “Dover Beach” right after a pompous religious program that preceded his show.

digiti...@gmail.com

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Jun 26, 2019, 5:42:02 PM6/26/19
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Bill Watson's show on WNCN introduced me the Wagner's Ring over several nights of listening. I had WNCN on every night as a routine.

AB

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Jun 26, 2019, 7:31:44 PM6/26/19
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was listening to WNCN when it went off the air..... never forget it

lambiase...@gmail.com

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Dec 9, 2019, 4:01:40 PM12/9/19
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I'm sorry I can't help but maybe you can help me. There was a DJ who used the word Baracoco. Do you or any of your friends remember his name?

louis_r_...@sbcglobal.net

sci.space

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Dec 10, 2019, 8:38:08 AM12/10/19
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On Monday, December 9, 2019 at 4:01:40 PM UTC-5, lambiase...@gmail.com wrote:
> I'm sorry I can't help but maybe you can help me. There was a DJ who used the word Baracoco. Do you or any of your friends remember his name?
>
> louis_r_...@sbcglobal.net

DeKoven. did not like anyone to use his first name. Also used OTW and Super-OTW, mostly for fast movements of Vivaldi concertos.

AB

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Dec 10, 2019, 2:08:46 PM12/10/19
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I remember him from way back...sort of a bit strange if IRC

AB

Frank Berger

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Dec 10, 2019, 2:54:29 PM12/10/19
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Possibly because it was Seymour.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seymour_DeKoven

Ed Presson

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Dec 10, 2019, 7:23:25 PM12/10/19
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"Frank Berger" wrote in message
news:F8udnZVAm_dwanLA...@supernews.com...
I remember listening to DeKoven many decades ago when his show was carried
on a classical FM station in Seattle.

I found his both amusing and annoying, especially when he went way overboard
on a piece of music that I
found more annoying than amusing.


radio...@cs.com

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Jan 24, 2020, 2:49:47 PM1/24/20
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> >
> > DeKoven. did not like anyone to use his first name. Also used OTW and
> > Super-OTW, mostly for fast movements of Vivaldi concertos.
> >
>
> >Possibly because it was Seymour.
>
> >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seymour_DeKoven
>
> I remember listening to DeKoven many decades ago when his show was carried
> on a classical FM station in Seattle.
>
> I found his both amusing and annoying, especially when he went way overboard
> on a piece of music that I
> found more annoying than amusing.



Hius show was on WRFM in NY, on 105.1. He bought airtime and provided tapes to be played. He was apparently quite successful at it, getting donations, many cash, mailed in. I saw him and his engineer opening envelopes splitting the take between checks which went to the bank, and cash which (I'm told) disappeared.

If it weren't for Nonesuch records of baroque music, there were few baroque recordings those days, but Vivaldi, Sammartini, Bach and others filled his hour-long broadcasts. The music always sounded the same, and in fact old and newly recorded shows were intermixed

jze...@gmail.com

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Jun 4, 2020, 10:32:05 AM6/4/20
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Didn't Charles Duvall do "To FranceWith Music"on WQXR?

JohnGavin

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Jun 4, 2020, 11:56:45 AM6/4/20
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Anyone remember “The Age of Baroque” hosted by Igor Kipnis? I think it WQXR. We’re taking the 60s.
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