Carlos Paita

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music...@gmail.com

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Jul 5, 2013, 6:20:58 AM7/5/13
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rkhalona

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Jul 18, 2013, 9:17:54 PM7/18/13
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On Friday, July 5, 2013 3:20:58 AM UTC-7, music...@gmail.com wrote:
> http://www.ultraaudio.com/music/keepers_20080601.htm

Someone here, many years ago (going by memory, his name may have been Keith Edgerley) about Paita conducting the Brahms "Academic Festival Overture", IIRC, with the Washington National Symphony. Apparently he and the orchestra fell out of sync at some point and Paita was heard to tell at the musicians from the podium: "Ay caramba!"
Mr. Edgerley then said that since that concert the overture would forever be referred to as the "Ay Caramba Festival Overture".

I had heard some stories that Paita was independently wealthy and that Lodia was actually his label. Richard Freed mentions none of that in his writeup, so that makes me doubt. I did not think much about his Bruckner, but I did like his Dvorak 7th a great deal.

Ramon Khalona

piano...@gmail.com

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Jul 18, 2013, 9:50:57 PM7/18/13
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I have to say that the Pathetique is simply ne plus ultra. The march is "to die".

Paita may be many things, but he was never dull.

TD

daw

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Jul 19, 2013, 12:55:12 PM7/19/13
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I was fortunate to hear the performance with the National Symphony. Indeed, Paita conducted a raucous
Brahms (more Festival than Academic!), a stunning Tristan "Prelude and Liebestod" and an unforgettable
Bruckner 4th. He became so carried away during the Bruckner that he "rent his garment", tearing his tux up the back. I went back with a friend afterwards and many of the orchestra members were clearly
quite put off; I consider it one of the most memorable orchestral concerts I have ever attended.

Do not miss his "Symphonie Fantastique". It deserved its "Grand Prix du Disque". Also his Dvorak 7th and Mahler 1st.

Truly one of a kind.

jrsnfld

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Jul 19, 2013, 2:32:46 PM7/19/13
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On Friday, July 19, 2013 9:55:12 AM UTC-7, daw wrote:

> I was fortunate to hear the performance with the National Symphony. Indeed, Paita conducted a raucous
>
> Brahms (more Festival than Academic!), a stunning Tristan "Prelude and Liebestod" and an unforgettable
>
> Bruckner 4th. He became so carried away during the Bruckner that he "rent his garment", tearing his tux up the back. I went back with a friend afterwards and many of the orchestra members were clearly
>
> quite put off; I consider it one of the most memorable orchestral concerts I have ever attended.
>
>
>
> Do not miss his "Symphonie Fantastique". It deserved its "Grand Prix du Disque". Also his Dvorak 7th and Mahler 1st.
>
>
>
> Truly one of a kind.

I wish I'd heard him conduct live. I agree that his Berlioz is a must-hear. The Wagner disc of preludes and chunks, especially the Tristan Liebestod, is also very compelling.

--Jeff

Gerard

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Jul 19, 2013, 3:53:44 PM7/19/13
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daw <pmc...@cox.net> typed:
>
> I was fortunate to hear the performance with the National Symphony.
> Indeed, Paita conducted a raucous
> Brahms (more Festival than Academic!), a stunning Tristan "Prelude
> and Liebestod" and an unforgettable
> Bruckner 4th. He became so carried away during the Bruckner that he
> "rent his garment", tearing his tux up the back. I went back with a
> friend afterwards and many of the orchestra members were clearly
> quite put off; I consider it one of the most memorable orchestral
> concerts I have ever attended.
>
> Do not miss his "Symphonie Fantastique". It deserved its "Grand Prix
> du Disque".

I have that.
Deserves a "Razzie du disque".

Steve de Mena

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Jul 20, 2013, 2:50:18 PM7/20/13
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I don't doubt that Lodia was his label. They only featured his
recordings, no?

I see most of the Lodia recordings still available in the US at iTunes
ans Amazon MP3.

Steve

music...@gmail.com

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Jul 20, 2013, 4:37:01 PM7/20/13
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Paul

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Jul 20, 2013, 5:52:09 PM7/20/13
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Lodia also offered at least one CD by the Fine Arts Quartet, with Mozart K. 465 and Schubert D. 810. The catalog number is LO-CD 7700 and it was published in 1986. Excellent sound, good performances, not at all like Paita's wild interpretations.

Paul Goldstein

MiNe 109

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Jul 20, 2013, 6:29:05 PM7/20/13
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In article <nKSdneyJ4Px3RnfM...@giganews.com>,
I might check that out. I've tried to enjoy his Berlioz on cd but have
been discouraged by a screechy recording quality.

Stephen

operafan

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Jul 21, 2013, 3:27:19 PM7/21/13
to
On Saturday, July 20, 2013 6:29:05 PM UTC-4, MiNe 109 wrote:
>
>
> I might check that out. I've tried to enjoy his Berlioz on cd but have
>
> been discouraged by a screechy recording quality.

So was I. This was the only Paita recording I was able to obtain through my local library network, and I found it so shrill as to be unlistenable.

Steve de Mena

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Jul 24, 2013, 3:54:50 AM7/24/13
to
On 7/18/13 6:50 PM, piano...@gmail.com wrote:

> I have to say that the Pathetique is simply ne plus ultra. The march is "to die".
>
> Paita may be many things, but he was never dull.
>
> TD
>

Played it once and didn't feel it was to die for, compared to
Karajan's DG 1970s recording. WIll play it a few more times.

Anyone else here have the Paita Tchaikovsky 6th? It's on iTunes.

Steve

gggg gggg

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Aug 3, 2021, 9:58:35 PMAug 3
to
On Friday, July 19, 2013 at 9:55:12 AM UTC-7, daw wrote:
> On Thursday, July 18, 2013 9:50:57 PM UTC-4, piano...@gmail.com wrote:
> > On Thursday, July 18, 2013 9:17:54 PM UTC-4, rkhalona wrote:
> >
> > > On Friday, July 5, 2013 3:20:58 AM UTC-7, music...@gmail.com wrote:
> >
> > >
> >
> > > > http://www.ultraaudio.com/music/keepers_20080601.htm
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > > Someone here, many years ago (going by memory, his name may have been Keith Edgerley) about Paita conducting the Brahms "Academic Festival Overture", IIRC, with the Washington National Symphony. Apparently he and the orchestra fell out of sync at some point and Paita was heard to tell at the musicians from the podium: "Ay caramba!"
> >
> > >
> >
> > > Mr. Edgerley then said that since that concert the overture would forever be referred to as the "Ay Caramba Festival Overture".
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > > I had heard some stories that Paita was independently wealthy and that Lodia was actually his label. Richard Freed mentions none of that in his writeup, so that makes me doubt. I did not think much about his Bruckner, but I did like his Dvorak 7th a great deal.
> >
> >
> >
> > I have to say that the Pathetique is simply ne plus ultra. The march is "to die".
> >
> >
> >
> > Paita may be many things, but he was never dull.
> >
> >
> >
> > TD
> I was fortunate to hear the performance with the National Symphony. Indeed, Paita conducted a raucous
> Brahms (more Festival than Academic!), a stunning Tristan "Prelude and Liebestod"...

This London Phase 4 lp may be of interest:

https://www.wolfgangs.com/jazz-record-mart-vinyl-cds-and-dvds/carlos-paita/vinyl-12/ZZZ044005.html

gggg gggg

unread,
Aug 3, 2021, 10:02:01 PMAug 3
to
According to this:

- When Paita became dissatisfied with the sonic focus of Decca/London's "Phase 4" series, in which his recordings were issued from 1968 to 1978, his backers bought all the master tapes and formed their own company, Lodia, on which label the recordings were reissued after being re-edited and remixed under Paita's supervision.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/style/1983/02/27/carlos-paitas-inspired-timing/a8c0f562-0469-4550-888b-179956ba686b/
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