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Chopin Etudes recommendation wanted

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Kwai Chang Caine

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Jun 15, 2005, 3:52:32 AM6/15/05
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I have just started learning Op. 10, No. 3 and I am curious as to what
everyone thinks are the best recordings of the Etudes. They don't have
to be a set.

I have Op. 10 no. 1 and no. 12 by Richter and they are of course
fabulous. However, I would like recommendations on the others in both
Op. 10 and Op. 25.

Thanks!

KCC

François Charton

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Jun 15, 2005, 4:39:36 AM6/15/05
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"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
1118821952.5...@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

You should listen to Cortot. He recorded the pieces several times (at least
twice the complete set, in the 30s and 40s, the latter being usually
considered the best one, and some specific ones in the 20s, in less than
optimal quality). Not many pianist play them in this way nowadays, but it is
in my opinion the most musical version of the etudes.

If you are studying them, consider buying or borrowing his study edition of
the score. It has very detailed (and often ingenious) fingering indications,
exercises tailored to each study's specific difficulties (which are not
always where they seem to be at first glance), and interesting notes on
interpretation.

In the same style, but in a more modern version (and therefore better
sound), you could also try Samson Francois (one of Cortot's pupils) for a
very special reading of the etudes (not to everyone's taste, though, sounds
very very french...)

Francois


fh...@yahoo.com

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Jun 15, 2005, 6:15:09 AM6/15/05
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Pollini is my favourite for the entire set, but François and Cortot
also offer good alternatives.

b.a.

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Jun 15, 2005, 7:59:32 AM6/15/05
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fh...@yahoo.com wrote:

>Pollini is my favourite for the entire set, but François and Cortot
>also offer good alternatives.
>
>
>

I completely agree with this statement: Pollini, with Cortot and
Francois as additional recordings.

b.a.

will_ne...@hotmail.com

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Jun 15, 2005, 8:17:15 AM6/15/05
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For me: Louis Lortie on Chandos (CHAN8482)

Bill Carroll

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Jun 15, 2005, 8:42:05 AM6/15/05
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I've just picked up a 2-cd Decca set with Ashkenazy playing all three
sonatas as well as all of the etudes. If you like Vladimir, this is a great
buy.
--
bill carroll, toronto

lv...@sympatico.ca


"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118821952.5...@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Matt

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Jun 15, 2005, 8:58:56 AM6/15/05
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"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118821952.5...@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Sokolov in Op. 25.

Regards,
Matt


Sam

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Jun 15, 2005, 10:04:00 AM6/15/05
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On 15 Jun 2005 00:52:32 -0700, "Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

For speed and accuracy, the sets by Gavrilov and Duchable are hard to
beat. I've seen them, at various times, selling for less than $4,
each. In comparison, Cortot is sloppy and slow.

Simon Roberts

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Jun 15, 2005, 10:11:12 AM6/15/05
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In article <1118821952.5...@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, Kwai Chang
Caine says...

Gavrilov, Berezovsky, Freire, Francois and Cortot for the whole lot, plus
Ginzburg and Sokolov in Op. 25.

Simon

Vaneyes

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:05:19 PM6/15/05
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Kwai Chang Caine wrote:

> I would like recommendations on the others in both
> Op. 10 and Op. 25.

Technique & finesse--Berezovsky (my favorite). Technique &
"whup-ass"--Gavrilov.

Regards

Kwai Chang Caine

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:31:28 PM6/15/05
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Thank to all who replied! That was extremely useful - I'll try to
find the recommendations at the public library before I decide which
one to get.

By the way, I followed Francois Charton's recommendation and looked up
the Cortot recordings. This may be common knowledge, but a version is
available online at: http://www.geocities.com/alfredcortot/etudes.htm

While I have not listened to any of others yet, Cortot's playing has
given mea very clear sense of a) how sad and yet wonderful this piece
is b) my own profound inadequacies as a pianist. Hopefully, time and
practice will enable this old dog to learn a new trick or two yet!

Kwai Chang Caine

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:33:46 PM6/15/05
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Kwai Chang Caine wrote:

> While I have not listened to any of others yet, Cortot's playing has
> given mea very clear sense of a) how sad and yet wonderful this piece
> is b) my own profound inadequacies as a pianist. Hopefully, time and
> practice will enable this old dog to learn a new trick or two yet!

I was referring to the Op. 10, No. 3 that I am currently in the process
of learning.

patter

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Jun 15, 2005, 1:38:12 PM6/15/05
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Arrau.

ajb723

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Jun 15, 2005, 8:57:09 PM6/15/05
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Many good sets are available: Cortot (but the wrong notes get tiresome).
Gavrilov, Cziffra( fabulous playing, but don't let this be your only set).
Perahia, Earl Wild, Juana Zayas, Freire in op. 25.-anxious to hear his op.10
--
Alan

Michael Lehrman

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Jun 15, 2005, 10:40:49 PM6/15/05
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"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118856688.5...@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
[snip]

>
> While I have not listened to any of others yet, Cortot's playing has
> given mea very clear sense of a) how sad and yet wonderful this piece
> is b) my own profound inadequacies as a pianist.[snip]
>
Even to a greater extent Cortot demonstrates his own inadequacies in this
music . Don't like his preludes either.
ML


Kwai Chang Caine

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Jun 16, 2005, 12:25:03 AM6/16/05
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Maybe Cortot is inadequate compared to others, and I certainly have not
listened to any Cortot other than the few minutes on the Art of Piano
DVD, but as a piano neophyte, I have not yet fully developed the
discriminating capability to distinguish the good from the great. I am
sure that with experience, I will be able to be engage in more critical
listening. Thanks again for the other recommendations!

Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 1:56:25 AM6/16/05
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"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118856688.5...@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...


Perhaps, but you should make a mental note
that in op. 10/3 no one comes even close to
Richter -- and definitely not Cortot.


dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 1:59:41 AM6/16/05
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"ajb723" <ajb...@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:BED646A5.DBE46%ajb...@optonline.net...

>>
> Many good sets are available: Cortot (but the
> wrong notes get tiresome). Gavrilov, Cziffra(
> fabulous playing, but don't let this be your
> only set). Perahia, Earl Wild, Juana Zayas,
^^^^^^^^^^^
---------------------------------|||||||||||


Are you kidding?

BTW some of the other recommendations are
almost equally bad: Gavrilov plays them
like a sewing machine, and Moron Perahia
somehow manages to imbue each and every
one of them with his own unique brand of
stiffness -- almost as if he were trying
to out-Wilhelm Wilhelm the 1st.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:15:22 AM6/16/05
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"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118895903....@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...


Don't underestimate yourself.

As a piano neophyte, you have much better
ability to distinguish the great from the
good than many experienced listeners, and
certainly more then professional reviewers.

You have not (yet I hope) had a chance to
borrow other people's ideas of how these
works ought to the performed.

Just use your years and don't let critics,
reviewers, teachers, pundits and kibbitzers
brainwash you.

Back to the original topic: the must have
and must hear Chopin Etudes go somewhat
like this:

For complete sets, my only current picks
are Cziffra and Yuki Matsuzawa. Yes, that
is correct, I haven't forgotten anyone:
Pollini is too cold, Ashkenazy (Decca)
is too lush, Ashkenazy (Melodiya) is too
dry, Perahia is stiff and uninspired,
Anievas, Browning and Wild too athletic,
Cortot too self-indulgent, Berezovsky
and Gavrilov compete for speed records,
Juana Zayas is too superficial, etc...

For complete op. 25 only, Sokolov and
Ginzburg are unmatched. I cannot think
of a single op. 10 that is competitive
with Richter's almost complete traversal
(IIRC he recorded 9 or 10 of them), and
some of them (e.g. 1, 3, 10, 12) are the
standard by which everyone else must be
judged.

For individual pieces, grab anything you
can by Ann Schein, Van Cliburn, Horowitz,
Rubinstein, Rosenthal, Friedman and Lhevinne.

As a counter example you may want to
listen to Wilhelm the 1st (Backhaus)
for one of the grossest butcheries
ever perpetrated in music.

I trust other pianophiles in the group
will fill in the gaps in my memories.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:17:10 AM6/16/05
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"patter" <patte...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118857092.6...@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> Arrau.
>

As a substitute for Valium or for Prozac?

At the same time Very heavy handed and
very under-driven. How this man was
allowed in a concert hall is beyond
my understanding. He should have
tended cows and sheep in Chile.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:19:17 AM6/16/05
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"Vaneyes" <van...@excite.com> wrote in message
news:1118855119.7...@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

>
>
> Kwai Chang Caine wrote:
>
>> I would like recommendations on the others in both
>> Op. 10 and Op. 25.
>
> Technique & finesse--Berezovsky (my favorite).


Technique and vulgarity with no feel for the music.

Mr. Berezovsky has never acquired the concept of
phrasing, nor would he recognize it if he heard
it.


> Technique & "whup-ass"--Gavrilov.


Technique and complete insensitivity. Sewing
machine.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:21:45 AM6/16/05
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"Sam" <sa...@nospammy.com> wrote in message
news:svc0b1po35o7gaq9i...@4ax.com...

>
> For speed and accuracy, the sets by
> Gavrilov and Duchable are hard to
> beat.


However, they do not compete in any
othre respect.


> I've seen them, at various times,
> selling for less than $4, each.


Far more than they deserve.


> In comparison, Cortot is sloppy
> and slow.


No doubt. But somehow he manages to
convince the listener that somewhere
beyond the notes there is music, even
though he is personally incapable of
delivering it.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 16, 2005, 2:22:25 AM6/16/05
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"Bill Carroll" <lv...@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:omVre.5144$Qr3.7...@news20.bellglobal.com...

> I've just picked up a 2-cd Decca set with Ashkenazy playing all three
> sonatas as well as all of the etudes. If you like Vladimir,

Which one?

dk


sidoze

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Jun 16, 2005, 5:22:00 AM6/16/05
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>Yuki Matsuzawa

Interesting, thanks. I will certainly get that (despite disagreeing
about Cziffra ;) ). Agreed Sokolov and Ginsburg rule op. 25 though.

sidoze

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Jun 16, 2005, 5:25:22 AM6/16/05
to
>Arrau

This is being remastered by EMI Japan and released at the end of July.
I would like to hear it again as it's been ages.

baldric

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Jun 16, 2005, 5:44:14 AM6/16/05
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A number of options IMO:

For Op 10 Gavrilov plays these very well and with amazing technical
ability. The Op 10 etudes do call on virtuoso performance more than Op
25 and in this respect Gavrilov is exceptional. So is Pollini but his
performance just doesn't have the bite that Gavrilov's has. But Op 25
is Gavrilov's downfall where he continues in the same mode when a
change of approach is called for.

Op 25 has two contenders for me - Cziffra and Ginsburg (I haven't heard
the Sokolov). The Ginsburg, recorded in the early 50s is both lyrical
and technically secure. The same could also be said of the Cziffra.

But for an overall set you have only four choices, two each by the same
pianist. Vladimir Ashkenazy recorded the complete set in 1959 and 1960
in Moscow for Melodiya in mono sound. He manages to bring out the
virtuosic elements in these works and present them as eminently musical
at the same time. A decade later he repeated the feat for Decca. Both
sets have their pros and cons but no other pianist I've heard is as
consistent over all 24 etudes.

The other contender (who also recorded them twice) gains points for his
sheer musicality but his technique is flawed. Alfred Cortot shows his
insight in so many ways but too many fingerslips tend to mar the
performances, magnificent as they are.

Overall, Ashkenazy in either set wins hands down and maybe the better
sound (though that is also flawed) of the Decca comes up trumps.

Other versions worth hearing come from

Elisso Virssaladze
Augustin Anievas (another fabulous technician)
Maurizio Pollini

Tom Deacon

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:00:34 AM6/16/05
to


On 6/16/05 2:15 AM, in article 42b118fa$1...@news.meer.net, "Dan Koren"
<dank...@yahoo.com> wrote:


> For complete op. 25 only, Sokolov and
> Ginzburg are unmatched. I cannot think
> of a single op. 10 that is competitive
> with Richter's almost complete traversal
> (IIRC he recorded 9 or 10 of them), and
> some of them (e.g. 1, 3, 10, 12) are the
> standard by which everyone else must be
> judged.

No. 1?

Richter?

I presume, then, that you have never heard Op. 10 No. 1 by the young Martha
Argerich in Warsaw as part of her etudes competition.

TD

Tom Deacon

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:12:42 AM6/16/05
to


On 6/16/05 5:44 AM, in article
1118915054.5...@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "baldric"
<bal...@australia.edu> wrote:


> But for an overall set you have only four choices, two each by the same
> pianist. Vladimir Ashkenazy recorded the complete set in 1959 and 1960
> in Moscow for Melodiya in mono sound. He manages to bring out the
> virtuosic elements in these works and present them as eminently musical
> at the same time. A decade later he repeated the feat for Decca. Both
> sets have their pros and cons but no other pianist I've heard is as
> consistent over all 24 etudes.

I had the opportunity to hear Ashkenazy perform all 24 etudes in one recital
at about the same time the first set was recorded.

It was an unbelievable demonstration of pianistic ability, finesse, poetry
and technical agility. He was laying is bona fides on the table of the West
and his entire career was the result of this demonstration.

Somehow, however, neither the Melodiya nor the Decca recordings come close
to capturing the effect of that live performance. Perhaps no recording can.

But one thing is clear: Ashkenazy owned this repertoire at that time, if not
for all time.

TD

Tom Deacon

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:08:44 AM6/16/05
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On 6/16/05 5:25 AM, in article
1118913922.7...@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com, "sidoze"
<sid...@gmail.com> wrote:

I doubt that "remastering" will help this recording.

I have owned it in various forms since its first release in 1955/6 on two
LPs. The recording is very plummy, in a typical EMI mono way, and Arrau
plays these pieces like studies rather than Etudes.

TD

alanwa...@aol.com

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Jun 16, 2005, 8:36:53 AM6/16/05
to

I am very happy, as mentioned in another thread, with either Joyce
Hatto or Augustin Anievas with JH slightly more "characterful" in my
opinion.
Either way you have artists with complete technical command of these
pieces so that they are able, in my opinion, to concentrate on the
musical expression that comes with them.

Joyce Hatto's latest recording includes a very interesting memoire of
Cortot. She played both sets to him and all this is recounted in her
notes. He insisted on encoring her several times. Cortot discusses
some aspects of his recordings of them and these are recounted, too.

Joyce herself suggests that another great interpreter on record was the
Polish pianist Raul Koczalski, taught solely, she says, by Milkuli,
Chopin's favourite pupil. She has recordings of Koczalski playing the
complete Etudes and also Ecossaises. He died in 1948.

I would strongly support the suggestion, as always, that you should go
with your own ears.

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins

Josep Vilanova

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Jun 16, 2005, 9:52:22 AM6/16/05
to

When I was 10 I got the LP of Tamas Vasary playing the Etudes and that
performance got imprinted on me. I haven't found any other recording I like
better. Has it been reissued on CD?


J

On 16/6/05 1:36 pm, in article
1118925413.9...@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,

Vaneyes

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Jun 16, 2005, 12:41:45 PM6/16/05
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Josep Vilanova wrote:
> When I was 10 I got the LP of Tamas Vasary playing the Etudes and that
> performance got imprinted on me. I haven't found any other recording I like
> better. Has it been reissued on CD?

http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product//4775510.htm

Regards

Josep Vilanova

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Jun 16, 2005, 12:52:30 PM6/16/05
to
Thanks, I've just ordered it. It's always a bit scary to see if our
childhood memories correspond with reality.


j


On 16/6/05 5:41 pm, in article
1118940105.0...@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "Vaneyes"

John Harrington

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Jun 16, 2005, 1:54:36 PM6/16/05
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Dan Koren wrote:
> "patter" <patte...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1118857092.6...@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > Arrau.
> >
>
> As a substitute for Va<snip>

Jeeezus. Do you ever bore yourself to sleep? You've been doing this
same tired shtick for decades.


J

Steve Emerson

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Jun 16, 2005, 4:52:26 PM6/16/05
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In article <42b118fa$1...@news.meer.net>, "Dan Koren" <dank...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

> Back to the original topic: the must have
> and must hear Chopin Etudes go somewhat
> like this:
>
> For complete sets, my only current picks
> are Cziffra and Yuki Matsuzawa. Yes, that
> is correct, I haven't forgotten anyone:
> Pollini is too cold, Ashkenazy (Decca)
> is too lush, Ashkenazy (Melodiya) is too
> dry, Perahia is stiff and uninspired,
> Anievas, Browning and Wild too athletic,

Wild, athletic?

> Cortot too self-indulgent, Berezovsky
> and Gavrilov compete for speed records,

But probably often lose to your Cziffra (I'd put him in this sentence instead).

Berezovsky seems to me enormously more satisfactory than Gavrilov.

> Juana Zayas is too superficial, etc...

Must listening: Timofeyeva on a Voice of Lyrics CD. This is stronger than her
Melodiya recording, which OTOH has probably the only Op 10/9 that can compete
with Cortot's '30s account.

SE.

Andy Evans

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Jun 16, 2005, 6:26:05 PM6/16/05
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Arrau plays these pieces like studies rather than Etudes>

Does this mean he has a tendency to 'play' them plutot que de les
jouer? .

Tom Deacon

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Jun 16, 2005, 6:57:59 PM6/16/05
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On 6/16/05 6:26 PM, in article
1118960765.2...@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "Andy Evans"
<performan...@gmail.com> wrote:

More that il les travaille en etudes plutot que les jouer en musique.

TD

patter

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Jun 16, 2005, 7:57:25 PM6/16/05
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As I stated earlier; Arrau.

John Oster

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Jun 16, 2005, 10:03:14 PM6/16/05
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On 16 Jun 2005 16:57:25 -0700, patter wrote:

> As I stated earlier; Arrau.
>
April Fool's Day has passed.

LaVir...@aol.com

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Jun 17, 2005, 1:48:27 AM6/17/05
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Here's a list from a site called '"Piano Forum":

Aide, William (CBC CD [Note: Autographed])
Anda, Geza (Eurodisc LP, Op.25 only, 1955 live)
Anda, Geza (Testament CD, Op.25 only, 1956)
Anda, Geza (Arua CD, Op.25 only, 1965 live)
Anievas, Augustin (EMI CD)
Arrau, Claudio (EMI CD)
Ashkenazy, Vladimir (Saga LP)&(Melodiya-RCA CD)&(Melodiya-Bukok CD)
Ashkenazy, Vladimir (Decca CD)&(Repubblica Sabato musica CD)
Backhaus, Wilheim (Monopoly CD)
Badura-Skoda, Paul (Westminster LP)
Badura-Skoda, Paul (Op.25 only, MP3 format, live in 2000, from mp3.com)
Baglini, Maurizio (Phoenix Classics CD, on a steinway piano)
Baglini, Maurizio (Phoenix Classics CD, on chopin's piano, MP3 only)
Berezovsky, Boris (Teldec CD [Note: Autographed])
Berzins, Gints (Pavane CD, Op.10)
Bingham, John (Meridian CD)
Binns, Malcolm (Pearl CD, Mp3 only)
Biret, Idil (Naxos CD)
Biret, Idil (Op.25 only, 2000 live in Nurnberg, Mp3, from
idilbiret.com)
Boganyi, Gergely (Ondine CD, Op.25 only)
Bonnecaze, Veronique (Arcobaleno CD)
Brailowsky, Alexander (RCA LP, Special Thanks: Springna)
Browning, John (RCA Victrola CD)
Carbone, Pedro (RCA LP Germany Pressing, Special Thanks: Claudio
[Gift])
Cherkassky, Shura (Allegro Classica d'Oro CD)
Chiu, Frederic (Harmonia Mundi CD, Op.10 only)
Chiu, Frederic (Harmonia Mundi CD, Op.25 only)
Ciani, Dino (Dynamic box-set CDs)
Cortot, Alfred (Philips CD, 1933-34)
Cortot, Alfred (EMI CD, 1942)
Cziffra, Gyorgy (Philips CD)
Drzewiecki, Jaroslaw (Canyon Classics CD)
Duchable, Francois-Rene (Erato CD)
Ebi, Akiko/海老彰子 (Camerata CD)
Egorov, Youri (Musical Heritage Society LP, Special Thanks: Springna)
Fialkowska, Janina (Opening Day CD)
Fou, Ts'ong (Renaissance LP, Special Thanks: Lupu [for transfering to
CD format])
Francois, Samson (EMI box-set CDs)
Freire, Nelson (Decca CD, Op.25 only)
Gavrilov, Andrei (Seraphim CD)&(EMI CD)
Goldsand, Robert (Concert Hall 2LPs)
Goldstein, Martha (Pandora LP, mp3 format only)
Haas, Werner (Philips LP)
Haase, Erika (Thorofon CD)
Harasiewicz, Adam (Philips LP, Special Thanks: Claudio [Gift?])
Hauser, Adrienne (Buy from www.classicalarchives.com, Mp3)
Hobson, Ian (CFP LP, Special Thanks: springna)
Hoek, Martijin van den (Brillant Classics CD, Special Thanks: Winter
Melon[for duplication])
Hoffmann, Ludwig (Europa Klassik LP, Op.25 only)
Jablonski, Krzysztof (BeArTon CD)
Jenner, Alexander (Remington LP, Op.25 only)
Karsenbaum, Sylvia (Classics for Pleasure LP, Special Thanks: Claudio
[Gift])
Kempf, Freddy (Op.25 only, Privately rec. fr. BBC 3, Live Broadcasting
at Wigmore Hall, London, Dec 15, 2003, Mp3)
Kempf, Freddy (Bis SACD)
Kenter, Louis (Capitol LP)
Kilenyi, Edward (Remington LP, Op.10 only)&(APR CD,Special Thanks:
Claudio[Gift])
Kilenyi, Edward (American Columbia 78rpm, Op.25 only [Note: Only
available on 78rpm])
Kosuge, Yu (Sony CD)
Kuerti, Anton (Monitor, LP, op.25 only)
Kyriakou, Rena (Vox, LP, Op.10 only)
Leimer, Kurt (Heliodor LP)
Licad, Cecile (Music Master Classics CD, Op.10 only)
Lortat, Robert (Dante CD, Special Thanks: Impromptu [Note: 2nd Complete
Rec. in the History])
Lortie, Louis (Chandos CD)
Lugansky, Nikolai (Erato CD, Special Thanks: Franz)
Magaloff, Nikita (Philips CD)
Magin, Milosz (Decca LP, Special Thanks: springna)& (Accord CD)
Malikova, Anna (Real Sound CD)
Mamikonian, Vardan (Calliope CD)
Matsuzawa, Yuki/松&#8250;gゆき (Novails CD, Special Thanks: Impromptu)
Novaes, Guiomar (Vox CD)
Ohlsson, Garrick (Arabesque CD)
Penneys, Rebecca (Centaur CD)
Perahia, Murray (Sony CD, Special Thanks: Cici)
Perlemuter, Vlado (Nimbus CD)
Pollini, Maurizio (Pollini's 14-year-old Private Rec.Transfered From A
Tape. Special Thanks: Lupu [Gift])
Pollini, Maurizio (DG CD&LP)
Ponti, Michael (Dante CD, Op.25 only, live)
Renki, Dezco (Hungaroton LP, Op.10 only)
Reinhold, Walter (AMU CD)
Rusnak, John (Visionmark CD)
Saitkoulov, Roustem (EMI CD, Op.25 only)
Saperton, David (VAI/IPA CD)
Serkin, Rudolph (Not For Sale, Op.25 only, Live at Library of Congress,
USA, May 5, 1948)
Sevhonkian, Lorris (Ambitus CD)
Simon, Abbey (Vox CD)
Skavronsky, Alexey (Vista Vera CD, Live 1997)
Slenczynska, Ruth (The Musical Heritage Society LP, Op.10 Only,
Special Thanks: Etude, [Note: Autographed])
Slenczynska, Ruth (Decca, LP, Op.10 only, Special Thanks: Springna)
Slenczynska, Ruth (Decca, LP, Op.25 only)
Slesarev, Yuri (Vista Vera CD)
Slobodyanik, Alexander (Melodiya LP)
Smith, Ronald (APR, Special Thanks: Impromptu)
Sokolov, Grigory (Opus 111, Op.25 only, Special Thanks: Shibin [Gift])
Szekely, Istvan (Donau CD)
Timofeteva, Lubov (Melodiya CD)
Uninsky, Alexander (Epic LP, Special Thanks: Springna)
Varsi, Dinorah (Intercord LP)
Vasary, Tamas (DG LP)
Vered, Ilana (Connoisseur Scociety LP)
Wild, Earl (Chesky CD)
Wirssaladze, Elisso (Live Classics CD, Live, Special Thanks: Impromptu)
Wojtowicz, Boleslaw (Muza LP, Op.10 only)
Wojtowicz, Boleslaw (Muza LP, Op.25 only)
Wuhrer, Friedrich (Dante CD, Op.25 only, Special Thanks: Impromptu)
Zarankin, Boris (IMP Classics/Carlton Classics CD)
Zayas, Juana (Music&Arts CD)

Recently added:
Papazian, Artur (Proscenium Entertainment, DVD, 24 Etudes & 24
Preludes, Live at Carnegie 1985)

Kempf, Freddy (BBC, DVD, 24 Etudes)

Tsuda, Michido(Cypres CD)


koji (STSD)

***************Val

baldric

unread,
Jun 17, 2005, 6:42:00 AM6/17/05
to
No Ginzburg in that list. So how complete is it?

Kwai Chang Caine

unread,
Jun 21, 2005, 7:36:15 PM6/21/05
to
Well, I borrowed a bunch of CDs from the public library and listened to
several versions of Op. 10, No. 3 over the weekend and finally go to
Richter's version in the Sofia Recital CD. (Yes, I know it is
sacrilege but I do not possess this gem yet!).

10/3 is an achingly sad and yet wonderful piece, but suffice it to say
I have never heard anything so breathtakingly beautiful as Richter's
playing.

As an aspiring piano player, I obviously have a long long way to go,
but apart from the emotion, the most striking thing for me what the
range of dynamics that Richter possesses in this recording.... simply
unbelievable! My piano teacher keeps exhorting me to control the
dynamics (picture a lady in a strong Russian accent protesting "Softly,
softly.... you need to make Chopin sound like Chopin"...). I have
been trying, but I finally know what she is asking me to do!

Tom Deacon

unread,
Jun 21, 2005, 8:27:14 PM6/21/05
to


On 6/21/05 7:36 PM, in article
1119396974....@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "Kwai Chang Caine"
<ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote:

You might also lend an ear to the same Etude performed by Nelson Freire on a
new Decca SACD/CD hybrid of Op. 10, the Barcarolle and Op. 35.

I am not suggesting for a moment that he is Richter; he is, in any event,
his own musician. But it is very much worth hearing.

TD


Michael Lehrman

unread,
Jun 22, 2005, 8:15:49 AM6/22/05
to
"Kwai Chang Caine" <ssp...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1119396974....@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> Well, I borrowed a bunch of CDs from the public library and listened to
> several versions of Op. 10, No. 3 over the weekend and finally go to
> Richter's version in the Sofia Recital CD. (Yes, I know it is
> sacrilege but I do not possess this gem yet!).
>
> 10/3 is an achingly sad and yet wonderful piece, but suffice it to say
> I have never heard anything so breathtakingly beautiful as Richter's
> playing.
>
[snip]

Listen to his Op.25 No. 7
ML


Tom Deacon

unread,
Jun 23, 2005, 3:34:52 PM6/23/05
to


On 6/16/05 2:15 AM, in article 42b118fa$1...@news.meer.net, "Dan Koren"
<dank...@yahoo.com> wrote:


> For complete sets, my only current picks
> are Cziffra and Yuki Matsuzawa.

I can understand a degree of enthusiasm for Cziffra. Eccentric but
brilliant.

But with Ms. Matsuzawa you must be thinking with some other part of your
anatomy than your brain.

Faceless, typwriter, neat as a pin but utterly flaccid performances with
small, tiny poetic gestures added like so much rouge on the face of a
Russian doll.

ARGH!!!

The catalogue is FULL of interesting performances of these pieces without
encouraging unsuspecting buyers to plum their top dollar on mediocrity of
this kind.

TD

Message has been deleted

Tom Deacon

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Jun 23, 2005, 5:03:57 PM6/23/05
to


On 6/23/05 4:08 PM, in article 230620051608150396%ow...@xids.xnet,
"Owen Hartnett" <ow...@xids.xnet> wrote:

> In article <BEE0871C.4B1E%non...@yahoo.com>, Tom Deacon


> <non...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> But with Ms. Matsuzawa you must be thinking with some other part of your
>> anatomy than your brain.
>>
>> Faceless, typwriter, neat as a pin but utterly flaccid performances with
>> small, tiny poetic gestures added like so much rouge on the face of a
>> Russian doll.
>>
>> ARGH!!!
>

> Now you've made her sound interesting.

Oh, go for it, Owen.

It couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

Chuckle.

TD

Steve Emerson

unread,
Jun 23, 2005, 8:49:45 PM6/23/05
to
In article <BEE0871C.4B1E%non...@yahoo.com>,
Tom Deacon <non...@yahoo.com> wrote:

I would not go nearly as far as you do, but these squeaky-clean
performances have always seemed pretty unremarkable to me as well.

SE.

Dan Koren

unread,
Jun 23, 2005, 9:49:56 PM6/23/05
to
"Steve Emerson" <eme...@nospamsonic.net> wrote in message
news:emersn-5FE6B4....@typhoon.sonic.net...


I do my best to provide for all tastes.

And Matsuzawa's performances are far
better than merely "squeaky-clean".

That moniker is the trademark of
Mmes Zayas, Haebler, Haskil and
Uchida.

dk


Dan Koren

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Jun 23, 2005, 9:59:00 PM6/23/05
to
"Tom Deacon" <non...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BEE0871C.4B1E%non...@yahoo.com...

>
> On 6/16/05 2:15 AM, in article 42b118fa$1...@news.meer.net, "Dan Koren"
> <dank...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> For complete sets, my only current picks
>> are Cziffra and Yuki Matsuzawa.
>
> I can understand a degree of enthusiasm for
> Cziffra. Eccentric but brilliant.
>
> But with Ms. Matsuzawa you must be thinking
> with some other part of your anatomy than
> your brain.


Unlike you my dear, I never delegate
thinking to any other part of my
anatomy.


> Faceless, typwriter, neat as a pin but utterly
> flaccid performances with small, tiny poetic
> gestures added like so much rouge on the face
> of a Russian doll.


Even if that were true, it would be no worse
than your favorites Mmes Haebler, Haskil and
Uchida.

dk


Tom Deacon

unread,
Jun 24, 2005, 8:03:35 AM6/24/05
to


On 6/23/05 8:49 PM, in article
emersn-5FE6B4....@typhoon.sonic.net, "Steve Emerson"
<eme...@nospamsonic.net> wrote:

You put it so much nicer than I do, Steve, which should come as no surprise
to anyone.

TD

Tom Deacon

unread,
Jun 24, 2005, 8:06:40 AM6/24/05
to


On 6/23/05 9:59 PM, in article 42bb68e4$1...@news.meer.net, "Dan Koren"
<dank...@yahoo.com> wrote:

An irrelevant comment, of course as I have no "favourites".

Nothing could possibly equal the faceless, spineless, ever-so-tasteful
performances of Ms. Matsuzawa. She is the very model of Lily Tomlin's much
admired tasteful lady.

Ugh!

Perhaps you should move to the Orient and get your fill of such niceness.

TD


Dan Koren

unread,
Jun 24, 2005, 11:12:32 PM6/24/05
to
"Tom Deacon" <non...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BEE16F90.4BCB%non...@yahoo.com...

>
> Perhaps you should move to the Orient
> and get your fill of such niceness.
>


No shortage in Canada either.

dk