Black Composers Series

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JohnA

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Dec 8, 2018, 12:00:36 PM12/8/18
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I see that Sony is releasing the 1970s Black Composers Series on compact disc. The Box contains the 9 Lps released by Columbia Masterworks plus a disc of Spirtuals released on the regular Columbia label. Barnes & Nobel gives a release date of January 4, 2019.

0190758621524

-----
https://africlassical.blogspot.com/2013/02/anthology-black-composers-series-by.html

Columbia Records' The Black composer series.

It was about 1971 that Paul Freeman came to see me in Bloomington, where I was on the faculty of Indiana University. He had become aware of my work in the history, while he was well aware of the major contemporary figures, having already featured their works while on the staff of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Now he was with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and was interested in exploring the past of Black classical music.

What evolved was a plan to initiate a series of recordings covering a spectrum of orchestral music. Such a project needed funding and a non-profit channel to distribute these funds. We had a very promising meeting with the Irwin-Sweeney-Miller foundation in Columbus IN and I enlisted Indiana University's School of Music to sponsor the projected grant. Unfortunately, Indiana's interest was short-lived due to campus politics and Dr. Freeman was notified in Detroit by phone that the school was no longer interested (while I could have been given the news by a short walk to my office, if not by campus phone). Had Indiana University known that we had then enlisted the interest in the world's largest record label, Columbia, some thought might have been given at least to image. At any rate, Dr. Freeman phoned me immediately, concerned that the impending grant lacked an agency. I suggested contact with the Afro-American Music Opportunities Association, a newly formed organization in Minneapolis without a significant agenda, and this instantly became our replacement.
The intent was to produce four LPs per year, in an open-ended series. That pattern was effective for only two years. The third year only one recording was issued and Columbia's doors were closed -- despite the consistently enthusiastic reviews that blanketed all of American musical journals and newspapers.

Use of European orchestras was in part an economic move. The regulations of the American Federation of Musicians at the time required the engagement of the entire orchestra, no matter the instrumentation of the work in question. Their rules further influenced the choice in that they required any American who was to conduct a European orchestra to have a title with that group. This news was brought to a meeting we had at Columbia by John Hammond, who stated that Aaron Copland had just been fined for a violation of the ruling. Dr. Freeman, beaming, announced that he had just been engaged as Guest Conductor with the Helsinki Philharmonic. Had that not been the case, we were contemplating the recording of the Nunes García Requiem in the country of its origin -- Brazil -- if not with an orchestra in Spain or Portugal. But no matter, we had decided on the chorus from Morgan State University, which had recently excelled under Nathan Carter's direction at a symposium we held in Baltimore.

The series soon went out of print after Columbia's interest ended, until the College Music Society secured funding from the Ford Foundation for reissue of the entire set. Ford's proviso was that no additional profits were to be made by the reissue of the nine albums, and Columbia agreed -- but only for LP release, not for issue on the new CD format.

These recordings were made available to the public, with a reduced price for College Music Society members, presented in a boxed set with the cover illustration by Dr. David Driscoll, and for which I wrote new liner notes. In all orchestral instances, Dr. Freeman was the conductor.

Columbia M-32781 (1973); volume 1
Saint-Georges: Symphony concertante, op. 13 (ed. by Barry S. Brook;
Miriam Fried, Jaime Laredo, violins; London Symphony Orchestra)
-----: Symphony no. 1 (ed. by D. de Lerma; London Symphony Orchestra)
-----: Scena from Ernestine (ed. by D. de Lerma; Faye Robinson, soprano;
London Symphony Orchestra)
-----: String quartet no. 1 (ed. by D. de Lerma; Juilliard Quartet)

Columbia M-32782 (1973); volume 2
William Grant Still: Afro-American symphony.
----: 2 arias from Highway 1, U.S.A. (London Symphony Orchestra; William
Brown, tenor)
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: Danse nègre.
-----: "Onaway, awake, beloved" from Hiawatha's wedding feast (William
Brown, tenor; London Symphony Orchestra)

Columbia M-32783 (1974); volume 3
Ulysses Kay: Markings (London Symphony Orchestra)
George Walker: Trombone concerto (Denis Wick, trombone;
London Symphony Orchestra)

Columbia M-32784 (1974); volume 4
Roque Cordero: Violin concerto (Sanford Allen, violin; Detroit Symphony
Orchestra)
-----: Eight miniatures (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)

Columbia M-33421 (1975); volume 5
José Maurício Nunes-Garcia: Requiem Mass, M. 185 (ed. by D. de Lerma;
Doralene Davis, soprano; Betty Allen, mezzo-soprano;
William Brown, tenor; Matti Tuloisela, bass-baritone;
Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra; Morgan State
University Choir [Nathan Carter, director])

Columbia M-33432 (1975); volume 6
José White: Violin concerto (ed. by Paul Glass and Kermit Moore; Aaron Rosand,
violin; London Symphony Orchestra)
David Baker: Cello sonata (Janós Starker, cello; Alain Planès, piano)

Columbia M-33433 (1975); volume 7
William Grant Still: Sahdji (London Symphony Orchestra; Morgan State University
Choir [Nathan Carter, director])
Fela Sowande: African suite (3 excerpts; London Symphony Orchestra)
George Walker: Lyric for strings (London Symphony Orchestra)

Columbia M-33434 (1975); volume 8
Olly Wilson: Akwan (Richard Bunger, piano; Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Richard
Bunger, piano)
Thomas Jefferson Anderson: Squares (Baltimore Symphony Orchestra)
Talib Rasul Hakim: Visions of Ishwara (Baltimore Symphony Orchestra)

Columbia M-34556 (1978); volume 9
George Walker: Piano concerto (Natalie Hinderas, piano; Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
Hale Smith: Ritual and incantations (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
Adolphus Hailstork: Celebration! (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)

-----
https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/complete-album-collection/hnum/8747117

In the 1970s, CBS Masterworks made a groundbreaking series of recordings featuring the music of black composers. The nine LPs released all featured the pioneering conductor Paul Freeman. Sony Classical is proud to reissue the complete Black Composer Series in a single original album collection with each CD remastered from the original analogue tapes using 24 bit / 192 kHz technology. The composers featured span several centuries and come from many different backgrounds. The earliest is the unique Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745–1799), a composer, violinist and swordsman born in Guadeloupe who spent most of his life in France. A whole album of his music includes the Symphony op. 11 / 1, the String Quartet op. 1 / 1 and the Symphonie Concertante op. 13. Another complete album is dedicated to the Brazilian composer José Maurício Nunes Garcia (1767–1830) and his extraordinary Requiem Mass for Queen Maria I. José Silvestre White (1835–1918), a Cuban virtuoso violinist-composer in the mould of Wieniawski, taught pupils including George Enescu, and his Violin Concerto is interpreted here by Aaron Rosand. The English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912) enjoyed considerable success in his lifetime, most of all through his cantata Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast, an aria from which is included here, as is his orchestral Danse nègre. Coleridge-Taylor visited the USA several times, and was an inspiration for the young William Grant Still (1895–1978). Still’s Afro-American Symphony, the first by a black composer to be performed by a major orchestra, draws strongly on the musical language of the blues. His ballet score Sahdji and two arias from his opera Highway 1, U. S.A. are also included. Among the many other 20th-century composers featured are the Nigerian Fela Sowande (1905–1987), the Panamanian Roque Cordero (1917–2008), and the American Ulysses Simpson Kay (1917–1995). George Walker (b. 1922) has been called “one of the greatest composers of our time” by Fanfare, and three works by this Pulitzer winner are included: the Trombone and Piano Concertos as well as his Lyric for Strings. David Baker (1931–2016), the renowned jazz cellist and composer, was a pupil of Janos Starker, who plays his Cello Sonata. Hale Smith (1925–2009), another composer deeply involved with the world of jazz, is represented by his Ritual and Incantations. Other composers featured in this collection include Olly W. Wilson, T. J. Anderson, Talib-Rasul Hakim and Adolphus Hailstork. A bonus tenth album features Smith’s Symphonic Spirituals, arrangements of 12 spirituals for voice and orchestra, first released by Paul Freeman and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1979. Besides those already mentioned, the many superb performers in this collection include the London Symphony Orchestra on several albums, the Baltimore and Detroit Symphony Orchestras, and the Juilliard String Quartet. But it is the composers, many still little known today, who are the true stars of this milestone collection.

-30-

Oscar

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Dec 8, 2018, 12:32:24 PM12/8/18
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I went to Indiana U. in Bloomington, and took David Baker’s History of Jazz intro lecture. Most supreme and excellent stuff. I still remember the day after Carmen McRae died and he devoted almost the entire lecture to discussing her. Can’t listen to Carmen McRae Great American Songbook LP without thinking of Mr. Baker.

HT

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Dec 8, 2018, 4:01:49 PM12/8/18
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Thanks! Never heard of these composers before. Just listened to some music of William Grant Stil on YT. It's all very easy to listen to. I'm looking forward to hear the other composers mentioned.

Henk


cooper...@gmail.com

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Dec 8, 2018, 6:50:56 PM12/8/18
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On Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 4:01:49 PM UTC-5, HT wrote:
> Thanks! Never heard of these composers before. Just listened to some music of William Grant Stil on YT. It's all very easy to listen to. I'm looking forward to hear the other composers mentioned.
>
> Henk

This reissue looks great! The big surprise for those who haven't heard these recordings before is likely to be the Roque Cordero disc, which is astonishing--both music and performance. Nothing else rises to that level, imo, although the set is filled with interest. Now maybe Sony will be encouraged to reissue their great "Modern American Music" series, mostly mono but so what?

AC

HT

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Dec 9, 2018, 1:48:44 PM12/9/18
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Samuel Coleridge Taylor is a pleasure to listen to. It amazes me why he isn't more popular these days He cannot write a boring note. Calling him a black Mahler is an affront.

Henk

Frank Berger

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Dec 9, 2018, 5:31:35 PM12/9/18
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On 12/9/2018 1:48 PM, HT wrote:
> Samuel Coleridge Taylor is a pleasure to listen to. It amazes me why he isn't more popular these days He cannot write a boring note. Calling him a black Mahler is an affront.
>
> Henk
>

I wonder if anyone can recommend a recording of his violin concerto,
which he wrote for Maud Powell.

HT

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Dec 10, 2018, 8:36:38 AM12/10/18
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Ulysses Kay several works on YT. All easy to listen to. The performances could and should be better.
Somehow I'm not really a George Walker fan. Too 'impersonal', for me.

Henk

JohnA

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Jan 4, 2019, 12:54:52 PM1/4/19
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On Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 11:00:36 AM UTC-6, JohnA wrote:
> I see that Sony is releasing the 1970s Black Composers Series on compact disc. The Box contains the 9 Lps released by Columbia Masterworks plus a disc of Spirtuals released on the regular Columbia label. Barnes & Nobel gives a release date of January 4, 2019.
>
> 0190758621524
>
Barnes & Noble now gives a release date of January 18.
Presto Classical is offering them as downloads.

Bozo

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Jan 4, 2019, 2:12:54 PM1/4/19
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>On Monday, December 10, 2018 at 7:36:38 AM UTC-6, HT wrote:
> Ulysses Kay several works on YT. All easy to listen to. The performances could and should be better.


Robert Nathaniel Dett ( 1882-1943 ) , 2 of his solo piano works I enjoy ( other works also at YT ), although I have not purchased this cd :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6Dk-MJm180&list=PLflLBgfhJhOxxDla3GjODCsrzZl3ezSN2&index=14

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsjwCw3_z0w&list=PLflLBgfhJhOxxDla3GjODCsrzZl3ezSN2&index=6

Brief bio : https://nathanieldett.org/

Bozo

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Jan 4, 2019, 2:31:51 PM1/4/19
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Florence B. Price’s (1887 - 1953 ) “ Piano Concerto in One Movement” I also enjoy , more so than her Symphony in E minor , although I do not have this cd :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZ54dddRI08

Bio :

http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=1742
Message has been deleted

Bozo

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Jan 4, 2019, 3:02:59 PM1/4/19
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>On Sunday, December 9, 2018 at 4:31:35 PM UTC-6, Frank Berger wrote:
> I wonder if anyone can recommend a recording of his violin concerto,
> which he wrote for Maud Powell.

No, but here from a third-party :

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/Coleridge_Taylor_SRCD317.htm

cooper...@gmail.com

unread,
Jan 4, 2019, 3:21:31 PM1/4/19
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On Price, see https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/15/arts/music/florence-price-music-publisher-schirmer.html. Her story is more interesting than the music of hers that I have heard, unfortunately.

Concerning Dett, my first exposure to his music was via a very enjoyable Clive Lythgoe LP: https://www.discogs.com/Griffes-Ives-Dett-Clive-Lythgoe-Sonata-Three-page-Sonata-Suite-In-The-Bottoms/release/5495231. Has it ever been reissued on CD?

You also may have noticed this among the NY Times "best classical music recordings of 2016":

"R. NATHANIEL DETT: ‘THE ORDERING OF MOSES’ May Festival Chorus; Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra; James Conlon, conductor (Bridge). When NBC cut away three-quarters through its live radio broadcast of this gorgeous oratorio’s premiere in 1937, it claimed previous commitments. But it may have been responding to callers objecting to perhaps the first network broadcast of a major work by a black composer. The Cincinnati May Festival was responsible for that premiere, and its forces brought the work — since then largely forgotten — to Carnegie Hall in 2014, under the auspices of the late, lamented Spring for Music festival. In this live recording, the orchestra plays with driving energy under Mr. Conlon and the chorus, warmly hovering, is glorious. The soloists are excellent, particularly the radiant soprano Latonia Moore and Rodrick Dixon, fervent as Moses, here imagined not as a patriarchal bass but as a youthful tenor."

We heard the work when it was broadcast and found it enjoyable, although again, the surrounding circumstances may have led some critics to overpraise the music.

I pre-ordered the Black Composers series reissue as soon as I read about it here, and look forward to getting reacquainted.

AC

HT

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Jan 4, 2019, 4:07:20 PM1/4/19
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Op vrijdag 4 januari 2019 21:02:42 UTC+1 schreef HT:
> Steve, thanks! I like Bates' of The Bottoms. Somehow the music sound better on an older piano. Or, Bates is a more interesting pianist.

I was referring to Paul Bates' version of The Bottoms by Dett. The music sounds better on his old piano. Maybe he is also a better pianist.

Florence Price I find disappointing. This is only partly due to the lack of decent performances. She is an excellent craftswoman, has good ideas but in the implementation she too often disappoints, in my humble opinion.

Henk

Bozo

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Jan 4, 2019, 6:50:33 PM1/4/19
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>On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 3:07:20 PM UTC-6, HT wrote:
> Florence Price I find disappointing. This is only partly due to the lack of decent performances. She is an >excellent craftswoman, has good ideas but in the implementation she too often disappoints, in my humble >opinion.

The Piano Concerto has its moments, the E minor Symphony not, so I largely agree, the only 2 works of hers I've heard. Thomas Hampson has apparently recently released a cd of her songs I have not heard. YT ?

Bozo

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Jan 4, 2019, 8:22:07 PM1/4/19
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>On Sunday, December 9, 2018 at 4:31:35 PM UTC-6, Frank Berger wrote:
> I wonder if anyone can recommend a recording of his violin concerto,
> which he wrote for Maud Powell.

Very nice, bit Bruch-ian, thanks for the tip , Frank, my first hearing of the Coleridge - Taylor VC , here the Avie recording:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj6BemHAxuE&list=OLAK5uy_mNGxZeKDjWa0TgBGgRzqAeFOWCCWF0vrc

Philippe Graffin / Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra / Michael Hankinson

Oscar

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Dec 26, 2019, 4:09:12 AM12/26/19
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Already OOP. Within 12 months! Kicking myself for not buying upon release. I thought I could get it 20-30 percent off at holiday big box sale. Well, that didn't work out so well. Listing for $89.99 new on resell sites.

earb...@gmail.com

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Dec 26, 2019, 5:04:24 AM12/26/19
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I purchased a copy of this set almost immediately upon release. This reminds me that I need to listen to it as there is a treasure trove of great things included in this.

cooper...@gmail.com

unread,
Dec 26, 2019, 8:07:40 AM12/26/19
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On Thursday, December 26, 2019 at 5:04:24 AM UTC-5, earb...@gmail.com wrote:
> I purchased a copy of this set almost immediately upon release. This reminds me that I need to listen to it as there is a treasure trove of great things included in this.

As noted earlier in this thread, I pre-ordered it *before* it was released despite owning several of the original LPs. The repertoire is unusual and mostly enjoyable, and I tend to regard rarities such as this likely to be one-offs--here today, gone tomorrow, at least in CD format. (I did note a used copy of the box on Amazon for about $39 + postage, btw.)

AC

Oscar

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Jan 8, 2020, 3:10:56 AM1/8/20
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On Thursday, December 26, 2019 at 7:07:40 AM, Alan C. wrote:
>
> As noted earlier in this thread, I pre-ordered it *before* it was released despite owning several of the
> original LPs. The repertoire is unusual and mostly enjoyable, and I tend to regard rarities such as this likely
> to be one-offs--here today, gone tomorrow, at least in CD format.

Amazon US now showing a 1/20/20 release date for Black Composers, just in time for Black History Month. I wonder if this is a second pressing, or if just a restock from Sony Classical Germany, where head of catalog exploitation & producer Robert Russ resides and where (EU) all the boxes are assembled and made. With some mastering, of course, done in U.S. at Andreas K. Meyer's studio and Battery Studios in New York, and at Iron Mountain in Pennsylvania, where the U.S. archive resides . . . underground.

https://www.amazon.com/Black-Composer-Complete-Album-Collection/dp/B07HGGBXDH/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1NWMEC9HMKMTV&keywords=black+composers+series+the+complete+album+collection&qid=1578471024&s=music&sprefix=black+composers%2Cpopular%2C152&sr=1-1

Frank Berger

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Jan 8, 2020, 9:05:37 AM1/8/20
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I ordered mine in Dec. 2018 from Amazon for about $32. It's $99 now.
Yikes. What's the difference if it's a reprint or a reorder from stock?

cooper...@gmail.com

unread,
Jan 8, 2020, 10:11:58 AM1/8/20
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Oscar, that is a strange and ambiguous listing. It does not necessarily mention anything about a new pressing or even restocking. Could it be that the 1/20 availability refers to the new copy that is on offer from an Amazon seller @ $99.95? Also nice to know that the item comprises "0CD" :-)

Anyway, my next big box is this one (now on order): https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Album-Collection-Gyorgy-Sandor/dp/B07Z761RMM/, which I suspect will be another "here-today-gone-tomorrow" item. Sándor was a favorite artist of mine when I was a kid. One of the few classical recordings my father owned was the Sándor/Rodziński Rachmaninoff PC#2 with on 78s, which I loved. No idea how he came by it. A bit later on, Sándor's recordings were my introduction to Bartók, and I think his performances hold up well.

AC

number_six

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Jan 8, 2020, 4:11:44 PM1/8/20
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My copy is "Still" in the queue.

I did not own any of the original LPs.

Frank Berger

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Jan 8, 2020, 5:39:47 PM1/8/20
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Not to denigrate the Columbia set at all, but somewhere I got the idea
that his playing in the Vox solo piano remaster was better.

https://tinyurl.com/wqp5a84


Message has been deleted

cooper...@gmail.com

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Jan 9, 2020, 10:39:08 AM1/9/20
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If you already read my previous response to your note (which I have just deleted), please ignore it. It included both a misunderstanding of your comment (with which I agree, btw) and additional misinformation. Sorry!

AC

Frank Berger

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Jan 9, 2020, 2:39:48 PM1/9/20
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No problem. I love to be right.

OW

unread,
Jan 11, 2020, 10:09:33 AM1/11/20
to
On Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 11:00:36 AM UTC-6, JohnA wrote:
> I see that Sony is releasing the 1970s Black Composers Series on compact disc. The Box contains the 9 Lps released by Columbia Masterworks plus a disc of Spirtuals released on the regular Columbia label. Barnes & Nobel gives a release date of January 4, 2019.
>
> 0190758621524
>
> -----
> https://africlassical.blogspot.com/2013/02/anthology-black-composers-series-by.html
>
> Columbia Records' The Black composer series.
>
> It was about 1971 that Paul Freeman came to see me in Bloomington, where I was on the faculty of Indiana University. He had become aware of my work in the history, while he was well aware of the major contemporary figures, having already featured their works while on the staff of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Now he was with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and was interested in exploring the past of Black classical music.
>
> What evolved was a plan to initiate a series of recordings covering a spectrum of orchestral music. Such a project needed funding and a non-profit channel to distribute these funds. We had a very promising meeting with the Irwin-Sweeney-Miller foundation in Columbus IN and I enlisted Indiana University's School of Music to sponsor the projected grant. Unfortunately, Indiana's interest was short-lived due to campus politics and Dr. Freeman was notified in Detroit by phone that the school was no longer interested (while I could have been given the news by a short walk to my office, if not by campus phone). Had Indiana University known that we had then enlisted the interest in the world's largest record label, Columbia, some thought might have been given at least to image. At any rate, Dr. Freeman phoned me immediately, concerned that the impending grant lacked an agency. I suggested contact with the Afro-American Music Opportunities Association, a newly formed organization in Minneapolis without a significant agenda, and this instantly became our replacement.
> The intent was to produce four LPs per year, in an open-ended series. That pattern was effective for only two years. The third year only one recording was issued and Columbia's doors were closed -- despite the consistently enthusiastic reviews that blanketed all of American musical journals and newspapers.
>
> Use of European orchestras was in part an economic move. The regulations of the American Federation of Musicians at the time required the engagement of the entire orchestra, no matter the instrumentation of the work in question. Their rules further influenced the choice in that they required any American who was to conduct a European orchestra to have a title with that group. This news was brought to a meeting we had at Columbia by John Hammond, who stated that Aaron Copland had just been fined for a violation of the ruling. Dr. Freeman, beaming, announced that he had just been engaged as Guest Conductor with the Helsinki Philharmonic. Had that not been the case, we were contemplating the recording of the Nunes García Requiem in the country of its origin -- Brazil -- if not with an orchestra in Spain or Portugal. But no matter, we had decided on the chorus from Morgan State University, which had recently excelled under Nathan Carter's direction at a symposium we held in Baltimore.
>
> The series soon went out of print after Columbia's interest ended, until the College Music Society secured funding from the Ford Foundation for reissue of the entire set. Ford's proviso was that no additional profits were to be made by the reissue of the nine albums, and Columbia agreed -- but only for LP release, not for issue on the new CD format.
>
> These recordings were made available to the public, with a reduced price for College Music Society members, presented in a boxed set with the cover illustration by Dr. David Driscoll, and for which I wrote new liner notes. In all orchestral instances, Dr. Freeman was the conductor.
>
> Columbia M-32781 (1973); volume 1
> Saint-Georges: Symphony concertante, op. 13 (ed. by Barry S. Brook;
> Miriam Fried, Jaime Laredo, violins; London Symphony Orchestra)
> -----: Symphony no. 1 (ed. by D. de Lerma; London Symphony Orchestra)
> -----: Scena from Ernestine (ed. by D. de Lerma; Faye Robinson, soprano;
> London Symphony Orchestra)
> -----: String quartet no. 1 (ed. by D. de Lerma; Juilliard Quartet)
>
> Columbia M-32782 (1973); volume 2
> William Grant Still: Afro-American symphony.
> ----: 2 arias from Highway 1, U.S.A. (London Symphony Orchestra; William
> Brown, tenor)
> Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: Danse nègre.
> -----: "Onaway, awake, beloved" from Hiawatha's wedding feast (William
> Brown, tenor; London Symphony Orchestra)
>
> Columbia M-32783 (1974); volume 3
> Ulysses Kay: Markings (London Symphony Orchestra)
> George Walker: Trombone concerto (Denis Wick, trombone;
> London Symphony Orchestra)
>
> Columbia M-32784 (1974); volume 4
> Roque Cordero: Violin concerto (Sanford Allen, violin; Detroit Symphony
> Orchestra)
> -----: Eight miniatures (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
>
> Columbia M-33421 (1975); volume 5
> José Maurício Nunes-Garcia: Requiem Mass, M. 185 (ed. by D. de Lerma;
> Doralene Davis, soprano; Betty Allen, mezzo-soprano;
> William Brown, tenor; Matti Tuloisela, bass-baritone;
> Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra; Morgan State
> University Choir [Nathan Carter, director])
>
> Columbia M-33432 (1975); volume 6
> José White: Violin concerto (ed. by Paul Glass and Kermit Moore; Aaron Rosand,
> violin; London Symphony Orchestra)
> David Baker: Cello sonata (Janós Starker, cello; Alain Planès, piano)
>
> Columbia M-33433 (1975); volume 7
> William Grant Still: Sahdji (London Symphony Orchestra; Morgan State University
> Choir [Nathan Carter, director])
> Fela Sowande: African suite (3 excerpts; London Symphony Orchestra)
> George Walker: Lyric for strings (London Symphony Orchestra)
>
> Columbia M-33434 (1975); volume 8
> Olly Wilson: Akwan (Richard Bunger, piano; Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Richard
> Bunger, piano)
> Thomas Jefferson Anderson: Squares (Baltimore Symphony Orchestra)
> Talib Rasul Hakim: Visions of Ishwara (Baltimore Symphony Orchestra)
>
> Columbia M-34556 (1978); volume 9
> George Walker: Piano concerto (Natalie Hinderas, piano; Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
> Hale Smith: Ritual and incantations (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
> Adolphus Hailstork: Celebration! (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
>
> -----
> https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/complete-album-collection/hnum/8747117
>
> In the 1970s, CBS Masterworks made a groundbreaking series of recordings featuring the music of black composers. The nine LPs released all featured the pioneering conductor Paul Freeman. Sony Classical is proud to reissue the complete Black Composer Series in a single original album collection with each CD remastered from the original analogue tapes using 24 bit / 192 kHz technology. The composers featured span several centuries and come from many different backgrounds. The earliest is the unique Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745–1799), a composer, violinist and swordsman born in Guadeloupe who spent most of his life in France. A whole album of his music includes the Symphony op. 11 / 1, the String Quartet op. 1 / 1 and the Symphonie Concertante op. 13. Another complete album is dedicated to the Brazilian composer José Maurício Nunes Garcia (1767–1830) and his extraordinary Requiem Mass for Queen Maria I. José Silvestre White (1835–1918), a Cuban virtuoso violinist-composer in the mould of Wieniawski, taught pupils including George Enescu, and his Violin Concerto is interpreted here by Aaron Rosand. The English composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912) enjoyed considerable success in his lifetime, most of all through his cantata Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast, an aria from which is included here, as is his orchestral Danse nègre. Coleridge-Taylor visited the USA several times, and was an inspiration for the young William Grant Still (1895–1978). Still’s Afro-American Symphony, the first by a black composer to be performed by a major orchestra, draws strongly on the musical language of the blues. His ballet score Sahdji and two arias from his opera Highway 1, U. S.A. are also included. Among the many other 20th-century composers featured are the Nigerian Fela Sowande (1905–1987), the Panamanian Roque Cordero (1917–2008), and the American Ulysses Simpson Kay (1917–1995). George Walker (b. 1922) has been called “one of the greatest composers of our time” by Fanfare, and three works by this Pulitzer winner are included: the Trombone and Piano Concertos as well as his Lyric for Strings. David Baker (1931–2016), the renowned jazz cellist and composer, was a pupil of Janos Starker, who plays his Cello Sonata. Hale Smith (1925–2009), another composer deeply involved with the world of jazz, is represented by his Ritual and Incantations. Other composers featured in this collection include Olly W. Wilson, T. J. Anderson, Talib-Rasul Hakim and Adolphus Hailstork. A bonus tenth album features Smith’s Symphonic Spirituals, arrangements of 12 spirituals for voice and orchestra, first released by Paul Freeman and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1979. Besides those already mentioned, the many superb performers in this collection include the London Symphony Orchestra on several albums, the Baltimore and Detroit Symphony Orchestras, and the Juilliard String Quartet. But it is the composers, many still little known today, who are the true stars of this milestone collection.
>
> -30-

Some beautiful stuff in that set. I particularly remember Hakim's "Visions of Ishwara", a compelling piece with an eerily beautiful flute solo at the beginning and end.

gggg...@gmail.com

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Jan 20, 2020, 3:52:25 AM1/20/20
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Check out this album on Youtube:

Top Tracks - Waites, Althea

Oscar

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Jan 20, 2020, 3:27:57 PM1/20/20
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Happy Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day to all.

Oscar

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Feb 5, 2020, 8:31:15 PM2/5/20
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Resorted to buying a 'like new' copy from eBay for not too much above original M.S.R.P. Had to have it in time for Black History Month, and very much enjoying the set. David Baker's Cello Sonata merited first audition for sentimental reasons.

Oscar

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Feb 14, 2021, 5:09:07 PM2/14/21
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The box is back in print. Quelle surprise! (I say that without a hint of sarcasm, too, btw.) Ten CDs for $29.99 at ArkivMusic. Can't beat that.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=2276790

Néstor Castiglione

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Feb 14, 2021, 6:10:26 PM2/14/21
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On Sunday, February 14, 2021 at 2:09:07 PM UTC-8, Oscar wrote:
> The box is back in print. Quelle surprise! (I say that without a hint of sarcasm, too, btw.) Ten CDs for $29.99 at ArkivMusic. Can't beat that.
>
> http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=2276790
It was amusing to find people trying to sell that set for inflated prices during the George Floyd protests last year. Around May and June I suddenly saw this set reappear on the second-hand market priced anywhere from about $150 - $300. It seems some people took to heart the (incorrect) belief that the Chinese use the word for "crisis" as for "opportunity."

The set is fantastic, though, and a very unexpected reissue. Now I hope that Sony will get around to reissuing the Canadian composers series and the recordings that RCA made in cooperation with Mexico's Ministry of Education surveying the music of 20th century Mexican composers.

gggg gggg

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Feb 15, 2021, 6:22:19 PM2/15/21
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"Pianist Lara Downes Is Reviving The Work Of Black Composers And Reframing The History Of American Classical Music":

https://www.artsjournal.com/2021/02/pianist-lara-downes-is-reviving-the-work-of-black-composers-and-reframing-the-history-of-american-classical-music.html

Oscar

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Feb 15, 2021, 6:59:27 PM2/15/21
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On Sunday, February 14, 2021 at 3:10:26 PM, Néstor Castiglione wrote:
>
> Now I hope that Sony will get around to reissuing the Canadian composers series
> and the recordings that RCA made in cooperation with Mexico's Ministry of Education
> surveying the music of 20th century Mexican composers.

Not familiar with the Canadian initiative, but 'yes' the Mexican survey. Would be great to see that.

number_six

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Feb 15, 2021, 9:13:56 PM2/15/21
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I have all or most of the Musica Mexicana series on ASV

What was the RCA series called? TIA.

Néstor Castiglione

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Feb 15, 2021, 9:29:17 PM2/15/21
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I don't think it had a name. It may have also been two series. One consisted of performances with the orchestras and ensembles of the UNAM; a second slightly later one produced by Charles Gerhardt sported recordings by the London Sinfonietta and New Philharmonia Orchestra led by David Atherton and Eduardo Mata respectively. The earlier set of recordings were sponsored by the SMACEM (the Mexican equivalent to ASCAP), while the latter was co-sponsored between them and the Secretariat of Public Education (SEP). Some of the later recordings were reissued over 20 years ago in a Silvestre Revueltas omnibus, but the rest have yet to see the light of day on the silver disc.

Néstor Castiglione

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Feb 15, 2021, 9:39:18 PM2/15/21
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On Monday, February 15, 2021 at 6:13:56 PM UTC-8, number_six wrote:
Looking on Discogs, I found that some of the albums in the earlier series bore the following imprint: "Voz viva de México: Serie música nueva (Living Voice of Mexico: New Music Series)."

number_six

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Feb 16, 2021, 12:44:05 PM2/16/21
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Thanks again. I have not heard any of those.
A reissue seems a longshot, but would be cool.
Message has been deleted

Joseph Serraglio

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Feb 28, 2021, 3:00:30 PM2/28/21
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$33.99 new shipped
https://www.amazon.com/Black-Composer-Complete-Album-Collection/dp/B07HGGBXDH

On Sunday, February 28, 2021 at 2:56:49 PM UTC-5, Joseph Serraglio wrote:

gggg gggg

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Aug 4, 2021, 6:54:43 PM8/4/21
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(Recent Y. upload):

William Dawson - Negro Folk Symphony (movement 3): Score and Analysis

Oscar

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Jan 17, 2022, 6:02:20 PMJan 17
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Reminder: This set is still 'back-in-print'. A clone of the original. Getting ready for Black History Month on this M.L.K. Day. The new Florence Price disc on DG, Symphonies Nos.1 & 3, is superb. A biography of Ms. Price was just published, too. The big Marian Anderson coffee table-sized box on Sony Classical was recently priced as low as $65 on A/\/\azo/\/. A great value, if only for the new transfers and restorations of the acoustic recordings of Negro spirituals. In other news, it seems the Lee Morgan Complete Live at the Lighthouse (1970) is already o.o.p. Issued last July. Some of my favorite late '60s jass.

Frank Berger

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Jan 17, 2022, 7:02:48 PMJan 17
to
On 1/17/2022 6:02 PM, Oscar wrote:
> Reminder: This set is still 'back-in-print'. A clone of the original. Getting ready for Black History Month on this M.L.K. Day. The new Florence Price disc on DG, Symphonies Nos.1 & 3, is superb. A biography of Ms. Price was just published, too. The big Marian Anderson coffee table-sized box on Sony Classical was recently priced as low as $65 on A/\/\azo/\/. A great value, if only for the new transfers and restorations of the acoustic recordings of Negro spirituals. In other news, it seems the Lee Morgan Complete Live at the Lighthouse (1970) is already o.o.p. Issued last July. Some of my favorite late '60s jass.

Not arguing, but the Lee Morgan set is still listed and apparently available at Amazon, plus plenty of used ones. Also plenty at E-bay, at least one as low as $28 with free shipping. The must have pressed "too many" of these.

Frank Berger

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Jan 17, 2022, 7:04:31 PMJan 17
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On 1/17/2022 6:02 PM, Oscar wrote:
> Reminder: This set is still 'back-in-print'. A clone of the original. Getting ready for Black History Month on this M.L.K. Day. The new Florence Price disc on DG, Symphonies Nos.1 & 3, is superb. A biography of Ms. Price was just published, too. The big Marian Anderson coffee table-sized box on Sony Classical was recently priced as low as $65 on A/\/\azo/\/. A great value, if only for the new transfers and restorations of the acoustic recordings of Negro spirituals. In other news, it seems the Lee Morgan Complete Live at the Lighthouse (1970) is already o.o.p. Issued last July. Some of my favorite late '60s jass.

If I was going to listen to one Lee Morgan track which should it be?

gggg gggg

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Jan 17, 2022, 8:41:26 PMJan 17
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Oscar

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Jan 17, 2022, 11:51:36 PMJan 17
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On Monday, January 17, 2022 at 4:04:31 PM, Frank Berger wrote:
>
> If I was going to listen to one Lee Morgan track which should it be?

Search For The New Land from album of same name. Also, Frank, I give my highest recommendation for I Called Him Morgan, a 2016 Swedish documentary that was distributed by Netflix. I do not have Netflix, but saw it at Laemmle Playhouse 7, Pasadena, in March 2017. One of the best documentaries of a musician I've seen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxLByThNvWU
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