Best of Igor Markevitch

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Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 11:20:16 AM5/27/06
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I have been "rediscovering" Igor Markevitch and his fairly rich
recorded legacy recently. In the sense that I always knew he was there
and heard some very interesting recordings from him, but somehow it
never occurred to me to investigate further until in a recent
discussion, his Schubert recordings with the BP were mentioned. I
looked it up and saw how much there is actually available from him, so
I ordered some of the discs - the DG set "un veritable artiste", EMI
GCOC, individual discs like PAAE and Rimsky-Korsakov works with the BP
and Orchestre Lamoureux, and a fantastic recording of Symphonie
fantastique with Lamoureux which for me was also a sort of rediscovery
- I have never been too fond of the piece, but Markevitch' extremely
lively and musically alert performance made me see it in a new light.
I already knew his great recording of Beethoven 5 and 8 with Lamoureux,
but even that I hadn't listened to for a long time before it was
brought back to my attention by an online discussion.
Amrkevitch combination of slender transparency with attention to
lyrical lines and fine detail makes for a lot of great listening, so
right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.

bzuk...@phillynews.com

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May 27, 2006, 11:23:36 AM5/27/06
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I mentioned on here a little while back that after years of searching
for a completely satisfying version of the Consecration of the House
Overture, I finally settled on Markevitch's. It may also be in that DG
box.

Barry

Gerard

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May 27, 2006, 11:37:59 AM5/27/06
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Michael Schaffer wrote:

I think his Stravinsky recordings should be mentioned (in a thread with this
subject line).
Specially his recordings of Sacre du Printemps.
And all his Tchaikovsky (symphonies, Manfred, some orchestral pieces).


Message has been deleted

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 12:32:14 PM5/27/06
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EM wrote:
> "Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> - 27 May 2006 08:20:16 -0700:
>
> > Best of Igor Markevitch
>
> I don't like his Beethoven all that much, but I thoroughly enjoy his
> recordings of Berlioz' La Damnation de Faust (despite it being
> incomplete) and Haydn's Die Schöpfung (impressive "Und es war LICHT!";
> great soloists, particularly Seefried).
>
> Eltjo M.
>
> Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

In the interview contained in the box, Markevitch names this (Haydn) as
his favorite recording. The Interview was made in 1957 in NY and oddly,
Markevitch speaks English with a very strong French accent. I was
surprised by this because I thought he was from Russia, but then I read
that his family emigrated to Switzerland when he was only 2.

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 12:35:10 PM5/27/06
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It is, and it is a very nice recording. I dimly remeber you talked
about how the bassoons come through very well. You probably meant the
beginning of the first allegro where they are indeed very audible,
despite the trumpet and timpani action going on at the same time.
Overall, his rhythmically very alert style and the slender, clear
textures produced by the Lamoureux orchestra (and also the brilliant,
at times even rasping, but never overpowering brass) appear like a
preecho of later sonorities produced by "HIP" ensembles.

Vincent Ventrone

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May 27, 2006, 3:24:13 PM5/27/06
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> I ordered some of the discs - the DG set "un veritable artiste"

IMHO the recording of the Brahms Sym. #4 in the DG set is easily the best
performance of the work I've ever heard -- and would be on any "short list"
of my all-time favorite recordings. This 4th is so lyrical & yet presses
ahead with such energy that it takes my breath away every time I play it.


Vincent Ventrone

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May 27, 2006, 3:25:07 PM5/27/06
to

> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.
>

I heartily recommend his Tchaikovsky set on Philips btw -- every recording
in it is a gem.


Paul Kintzele

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May 27, 2006, 4:36:35 PM5/27/06
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Michael Schaffer wrote:
> and a fantastic recording of Symphonie
> fantastique with Lamoureux which for me was also a sort of rediscovery
> - I have never been too fond of the piece, but Markevitch' extremely
> lively and musically alert performance made me see it in a new light.

And if you want even more intensity, try the 1953 Symphonie fantastique
with the BPO, which burns with astonishing brightness. DG released it
not too long ago.

The Damnation of Faust, as others have mentioned, is extraordinary. A
little below that, but still very good, is the Haydn Creation, cited
above. Tchaikovsky syms. 4-6 are superb; they don't hyperventilate in
the thrilling way that, say, Svetlanov's do, but they are full of bite
and energy. He was, it seems, very successful in the studio.

Paul

George Murnu

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May 27, 2006, 4:45:33 PM5/27/06
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Antologia de la zarzuela! -and La Perichole ain't bad either.

(still in an operetta mood after all these months...)

"Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1148743216.6...@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Paul Goldstein

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May 27, 2006, 4:34:14 PM5/27/06
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In article <e5a905$f29$1...@courier.brandeis.edu>, Vincent Ventrone says...

Good as the 4th is, I like the accomapanying Russian Alto Rhapsody even better.

Simon Roberts

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May 27, 2006, 5:01:58 PM5/27/06
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In article <44787230$0$7523$dbd4...@news.wanadoo.nl>, Gerard says...

Also his Haydn Creation and Berlioz Damnation of Faust, both on DG.

Simon

Johannes Roehl

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May 27, 2006, 6:16:16 PM5/27/06
to
Michael Schaffer schrieb:

> EM wrote:
>> "Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> - 27 May 2006 08:20:16 -0700:
>>
>>> Best of Igor Markevitch
>> I don't like his Beethoven all that much, but I thoroughly enjoy his
>> recordings of Berlioz' La Damnation de Faust (despite it being
>> incomplete) and Haydn's Die Schöpfung (impressive "Und es war LICHT!";
>> great soloists, particularly Seefried).

> In the interview contained in the box, Markevitch names this (Haydn) as


> his favorite recording. The Interview was made in 1957 in NY and oddly,
> Markevitch speaks English with a very strong French accent. I was
> surprised by this because I thought he was from Russia, but then I read
> that his family emigrated to Switzerland when he was only 2.

Yes, born in Kiev IIRC. Apparently he spoke better French than Russian.
(The interesting story is that in the late twenties and early thirties
the young Markevitch was hailed as on of the most promising composers
(the Stravinsky of his generation), but apparently stopped composing
sometime during or shortly after the war. His music can be found on
Marco Polo.
I second about everything said elsewhere in this thread. The DG-Box is
very good, the Mozart symphonies are fantastic (I wonder if there is
more, a 41 or 40?). Another interesting disc (maybe hard to find) is on
DG Originals with Milhaud's "Choephores", Roussel and Honegger. And the
classic recordings of Stravinskys L'Histoire du Soldat is led by Markevitch.

Johannes

Edward A. Cowan

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May 27, 2006, 8:35:51 PM5/27/06
to
I, too, have been "rediscovering" Igor Markevitch lately, even though
he is never actually out of sight (out of hearing?..). When I moved
about eighteen months ago, the first music I heard after setting up my
audio system included the following, cond. Markevitch:

Beethoven: Consecration of the House Overture (of course!) (DG)
Bach: Ricercar from A Musical Offering (EMI)

Quite recently, I listened to his Tchaikovsky Pathétique in Philips
426 848-2, four CD's with all six of Tchaikovsky's symphonies with
Markevitch and the LSO. These recordings date from the 1960's and, as
I discovered, there are extremely small drop-outs here and there
throughout this work, probably a sign of the recording's age. (The
performance is sensational.) There is another Pathétique in the DG set
with the BPO which I have not yet heard. Perhaps the Philips
Tchaikovsky symphonies have been reissued more recently in a pair of
two-fers? Perhaps with the drop-outs corrected? --E.A.C.

Raymond Hall

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May 27, 2006, 8:59:43 PM5/27/06
to
"Vincent Ventrone" <m...@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:e5a91r$f32$1...@courier.brandeis.edu...

>
>> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.
>>
>
> I heartily recommend his Tchaikovsky set on Philips btw -- every recording
> in it is a gem.


Nos 4, 5 and 6 are up there with the best imo, but think that Jansons wins
the prize for the best 1st (Winter Daydreams) that I have heard.

Markevitch has recorded several Rites which are easily among the best, a
superb Symphony of Psalms, a very lucid and beautifully controlled Apollo,
and his Carmen and L'Arlesienne suites sparkle nicely too (with a Lamoureaux
orchestra).

Basically he knew Stravinsky's music backwards, and I have a Philips twofer
labelled Igor Markevitch, "The Early Years", which contains the Apollon
musagete, Symphony of Psalms, and other bits of Stravinsky, and an excellent
L'histoire du Soldat with Cocteau, Ustinov, Andre and Parikian. Ustinov,
with his impeccable knowledge of about one zillion languages, always makes
me laugh in this performance of L'histoire, playing The Devil. Ustinov is
just incredibly ... cannot find the word ... but 'twee' would be close.

Ray H
Taree


John_H...@msn.com

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May 27, 2006, 8:57:21 PM5/27/06
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I've recently mentioned the Markevitch Choephores; his Liadov Fragment
from the Apocalypse (and a resounding Glinka Ruslan Overture (with the
Lamoureux); His Haydn 103 and 104 are quite good; the Berwald
Symphonies; Gounod's 2nd Symphony and Bizet Jeux D'Enfants (mentioned
in the Bizet posting); I saw him conduct the American Symphony (Rite
of Spring), quite an imposing figure on the podium and excellent
conducting. Hauser

Matthew B. Tepper

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May 27, 2006, 9:24:21 PM5/27/06
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The slightly abridged Berlioz "Damnation de Faust" on DGG.

Selected choral works of Lili Boulanger, variously released on Everest and
EMI (the same recordings).

Verdi Requiem with Vishnevskaya and other soloists, with the Moscow
Philharmonic, latterly available from one of the Cap'ns.

--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made. ~ FDR (attrib.)

jrs...@aol.com

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May 27, 2006, 9:42:58 PM5/27/06
to

I agree about the Haydn. His Haydn symphonies (along with the Beethoven
6 and overtures, his Brahms 1 and 4, and the Schubert already mentioned
here) are what convinced me Markevitch was a top conductor. I guess I
already took his Berlioz and Stravinsky for granted by then.

And of course any appreciation of Markevitch's conducting is augmented
by an appreciation for his wonderful music, but I assume the original
poster has already investigated that. The series on Marco Polo is
excellent, with some interesting supplements on Cascavelle, Largo, and
the NYPO's Bernstein box, of course. He was an interesting and fresh
composer.

--Jeff

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 10:21:19 PM5/27/06
to

I haven't heard any of Markevitch' compositions. Until recently, I
didn't even know he also composed. I see the recordings on Marco Polo,
conducted by a gentlemen named Lyndon-Gee with the Arnhem Philharmonic
("an orchestra too far"). Which pieces are the most interesting?

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 10:25:54 PM5/27/06
to

This is really a great recording. I listened to it today. It for me
also has the interest of being played by the Orchestre Lamoureux since
I am interested in orchestras playing music outside their traditional
repertoire. It is interesting to hear the slender woodwind (especially
the wonderfully snarly French bassons) and the bright brass, a very
different sound world from the WP, for instance.

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 10:33:53 PM5/27/06
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There is also a Tragic Overture with the USSR SO in the box. Apparently
originally Philips recordings. Strange how they recording quality of
these items (which are among the latest in the box, from 1963) suddenly
drops and becomes more markedly more muffled and unsteady than the
other stereo items which sound very good for their age - almost as if
recordings in the USSR automatically sound worse than the contemporary
ones made in the West. Maybe this has something to do with the
geographical position, or cosmic influences...
Generally, the sound quality in the DG box is quite good, and it is
interesting to see the sudden very drastic leap in recording quality
between 1957 and 58 when DG went to stereo.

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 10:41:41 PM5/27/06
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There is a copy on amazon.com, for $114...uh...
But I am going to Berlin next week, so I will snoop around a few record
shops, maybe I will stumble across a copy somewhere.

Michael Schaffer

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May 27, 2006, 10:45:42 PM5/27/06
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There is a Testament disc which has two different recordings of Le
Sacre on one disc (!), and an EMI 2-disc set with Stravinsky and
Prokofieff (or Prokofiev) which looks very interesting.

Steven de Mena

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May 27, 2006, 11:25:14 PM5/27/06
to

"Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> wrote in message

> I haven't heard any of Markevitch' compositions. Until recently, I
> didn't even know he also composed. I see the recordings on Marco Polo,
> conducted by a gentlemen named Lyndon-Gee with the Arnhem Philharmonic
> ("an orchestra too far").

LOL

Steve


Bob Harper

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May 28, 2006, 12:12:18 AM5/28/06
to
Raymond Hall wrote:
> "Vincent Ventrone" <m...@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:e5a91r$f32$1...@courier.brandeis.edu...
>>> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.
>>>
>> I heartily recommend his Tchaikovsky set on Philips btw -- every recording
>> in it is a gem.
>
>
> Nos 4, 5 and 6 are up there with the best imo, but think that Jansons wins
> the prize for the best 1st (Winter Daydreams) that I have heard.

Have you heard Tilson Thomas/Boston? I still think it takes some beating.

Bob Harper
>
>(snip)
> Ray H
> Taree
>


jrs...@aol.com

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May 28, 2006, 1:07:50 AM5/28/06
to

I'd say "L'Envol d'Icare" is essential, but if you read the review on
Amazon.com you will get a sobering assessment of the Arnhem
Orchestra...something to the effect that they are so incapable and
nervous that the poor conductor gets through the whole thing by
muttering "Hail Mary, full of Grace!" over and over to himself.

Ok, I think that's an exaggeration. The recording must be heard, but do
consider supplementing it with the two-piano-and-percussion version on
Largo, which is quite interesting unto its own. The piece is worth two
versions, and the fillers are different anyway. Bernstein's NYP
performance of the orchestral version (the later, tamer version, I
believe, but I get confused) is also worth hearing, but not worth
spending the $150 it takes to get it, if that's your only interest in
the box set.

I liked "Rebus" very much--it's got a lot of early Prokofiev and of
course Stravinsky in it as well, as does the discmate. And for a change
of pace, the Sinfonietta (a very early work) has some charm. But there
you have three of the Marco Polo volumes recommended, so perhaps I'm
just saying that each disc has its own value, and even if the music is
no longer shocking today, it still is compelling, even if not
ultimately at the "masterpiece" level, whatever that is.

I also have a disc on Pavane with several of Markevitch's piano pieces,
and unfortunately I don't remember a thing about it. It's been a while.

On Cascavelle you get a chance to hear Markevitch conducting his own
music ("Psaume") and that's a no-brainer: a must hear, except that it's
shakled with yet another of his "Rite of Spring" performances, which
grow on trees these days. Anyway, that should not inhibit you when you
feel like springing for the disc.

--Jeff

Brendan R. Wehrung

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May 28, 2006, 1:13:35 AM5/28/06
to


It's possible that the Soviet recording was made by a Soviet crew, and
they supposedly had a hodge-podge of microphones, which would of course
color the sound.

Brendan

MELMOTH

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May 28, 2006, 1:17:31 AM5/28/06
to
Ce cher mammifère du nom de Michael Schaffer nous susurrait, le samedi
27/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
même, et dans le message
<1148743216.6...@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, les doux
mélismes suivants :

> I already knew his great recording of Beethoven 5 and 8 with Lamoureux,

Markevitch has been Lamoureux conductor from 1958 until 1961...
To me, during that period, Lamoureux/Markevitch has been one of the 4
or 5 best orchestras in the world !!...
I get ALL it's records, and have listened to 5 or 6 concerts in
Paris...
Fa-bu-lous...In ccredible...The king of the baton, tell I to you !...

Markevitch was above all _a composer_...But his conductor working took
too much of his time...unefortunately for music...but not for records
!...

--
Car avec beaucoup de science, il y a beaucoup de chagrin; et celui qui
accroît sa science, accroît sa douleur.
[Ecclésiaste, 1]
Melmoth - souffrant


MELMOTH

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May 28, 2006, 1:25:27 AM5/28/06
to
Ce cher mammifère du nom de EM nous susurrait, le samedi 27/05/2006,
dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand même, et
dans le message <72tg729bidpfkggbg...@4ax.com>, les doux
mélismes suivants :

> I don't like his Beethoven all that much

I guess I have at least 50 5th symphonies versions !...
And my prefered on is by...Markevitch (Lamoureux/Philips) !!...
Maybe because it was the first I bought in 1958 (59 ?), on 25 cm LP
Philips !?...

Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 1:59:28 AM5/28/06
to

But the conductor here isn't Robert Redford.

jrs...@aol.com

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May 28, 2006, 2:52:11 AM5/28/06
to

But he *is* Catholic.

And one wonders if he was on crew at Durham College.

(see
http://www.whoswho-online.com/search.cgi?t=a_a=Lyndon-gee%0186246615119410)

Interesting stuff here. Apparently Lyndon-Gee is quite a book
collector, an amateur ornithologist (wonder what his Messiaen is
like?), and served as an assistant to Bruno Maderna (cool...conducting
doesn't get any better than that!).

Most importantly, his prowess with the violin section of the Havana
National Symphony earned him the nickname, "The Horsehair Whisperer".

--Jeff

Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 3:27:08 AM5/28/06
to

And he also lifts weights! I wonder if he has "Pumping Iron" on video.

> Most importantly, his prowess with the violin section of the Havana
> National Symphony earned him the nickname, "The Horsehair Whisperer".

I don't get that joke.

> --Jeff

jrs...@aol.com

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May 28, 2006, 3:31:23 AM5/28/06
to

Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 4:04:29 AM5/28/06
to

Aaaaahhh, OK, now I get it.

Gerard

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May 28, 2006, 6:28:57 AM5/28/06
to
MELMOTH wrote:
> Ce cher mammifère du nom de Michael Schaffer nous susurrait, le samedi
> 27/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
> même, et dans le message
> <1148743216.6...@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, les doux
> mélismes suivants :
>
> > I already knew his great recording of Beethoven 5 and 8 with
> > Lamoureux,
>
> Markevitch has been Lamoureux conductor from 1958 until 1961...
> To me, during that period, Lamoureux/Markevitch has been one of the 4
> or 5 best orchestras in the world !!...
> I get ALL it's records, and have listened to 5 or 6 concerts in
> Paris...
> Fa-bu-lous...In ccredible...The king of the baton, tell I to you !...
>

Since you have all his records and since Markevitch is the king of the baton,
maybe it's a nice idea to become a Markevitchniac and post all that stuff
somewhere.


Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 7:02:55 AM5/28/06
to

Yes, but please without tinkering with the sound! *Full Frequency
Markevitchniac Sound* - that thought makes me shudder, for good reasons!

Gerard

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May 28, 2006, 7:26:59 AM5/28/06
to

I don't know if Markevitch recorded it, but I'm longing already for those
messages like:

Engineer Melmoth's Meitisinger (FFMS) Vorspiel.mp3

Hmm.


Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 7:56:13 AM5/28/06
to

I don't think ansermetniac can spell "Vorspiel", but apart from that,
it was a good example.

How about this:

Engineer Melmoth's Tistrum and Islod (FFMS) Vorspeli.mp3

Josep Vilanova

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May 28, 2006, 9:14:02 AM5/28/06
to
How is the sound of that Manfred Symphony in the Great Conductors edition? I
just discovered I don't have any Manfred Symph on CD and thought in buying
it.

j


On 27/5/06 16:20, in article
1148743216.6...@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "Michael Schaffer"
<ms1...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I have been "rediscovering" Igor Markevitch and his fairly rich
> recorded legacy recently. In the sense that I always knew he was there
> and heard some very interesting recordings from him, but somehow it
> never occurred to me to investigate further until in a recent
> discussion, his Schubert recordings with the BP were mentioned. I
> looked it up and saw how much there is actually available from him, so
> I ordered some of the discs - the DG set "un veritable artiste", EMI
> GCOC, individual discs like PAAE and Rimsky-Korsakov works with the BP
> and Orchestre Lamoureux, and a fantastic recording of Symphonie
> fantastique with Lamoureux which for me was also a sort of rediscovery
> - I have never been too fond of the piece, but Markevitch' extremely
> lively and musically alert performance made me see it in a new light.


> I already knew his great recording of Beethoven 5 and 8 with Lamoureux,

> but even that I hadn't listened to for a long time before it was
> brought back to my attention by an online discussion.
> Amrkevitch combination of slender transparency with attention to
> lyrical lines and fine detail makes for a lot of great listening, so

Message has been deleted
Message has been deleted

Gerard

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May 28, 2006, 10:06:15 AM5/28/06
to
Josep Vilanova wrote:
> How is the sound of that Manfred Symphony in the Great Conductors
> edition? I just discovered I don't have any Manfred Symph on CD and
> thought in buying it.
>

I wish you had not asked that. Now I can't find those discs anywhere. ;-(


Michael Schaffer

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May 28, 2006, 10:16:16 AM5/28/06
to

Same here. I have already packed them in a large box because I am going
to Berlin next week for several weeks, and I need to take several dozen
CDs as acoustic nutrition. I can't get to them right now. Sorry.

Gerard

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May 28, 2006, 10:20:59 AM5/28/06
to

Found it!
The sound is in good stereo. Dry, detailed. Comparable to his recordings of
the symphonies with the same orchestra. Manfred seems to sound a little dryer
(a little less reverb), but this differs from symphony to symphony too.


Matthew B. Tepper

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May 28, 2006, 10:59:08 AM5/28/06
to
jrs...@aol.com appears to have caused the following letters to be typed in
news:1148792870.2...@y43g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:

> On Cascavelle you get a chance to hear Markevitch conducting his own
> music ("Psaume") and that's a no-brainer: a must hear, except that it's
> shakled with yet another of his "Rite of Spring" performances, which
> grow on trees these days. Anyway, that should not inhibit you when you
> feel like springing for the disc.

Oh, come on, just because Testament issued his two studio recordings of the
"Rite" on the same CD....

--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made. ~ FDR (attrib.)

Paul Goldstein

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May 28, 2006, 11:42:58 AM5/28/06
to
In article <Heudna6MdvuHheTZ...@comcast.com>, Steven de Mena
says...

That is a good one. But they play superbly in the Marco Polo integrale of Igor
the Second's compositions.

MELMOTH

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May 28, 2006, 12:28:26 PM5/28/06
to
Ce cher mammifère du nom de Gerard nous susurrait, le dimanche
28/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
même, et dans le message <44797b3f$0$2584$dbd4...@news.wanadoo.nl>,
les doux mélismes suivants :

> Since you have all his records and since Markevitch is the king of the baton,


> maybe it's a nice idea to become a Markevitchniac and post all that stuff
> somewhere.

My friend Oscar Wilde (but have you ever heard about him...) told me
last month that sense of humor was only despair politeness...
May I suggest you to get some despair lessons ?...

MELMOTH

unread,
May 28, 2006, 12:31:29 PM5/28/06
to
Ce cher mammifère du nom de Gerard nous susurrait, le dimanche
28/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
même, et dans le message <447988d8$0$58648$dbd4...@news.wanadoo.nl>,
les doux mélismes suivants :

> Engineer Melmoth's Meitisinger (FFMS) Vorspiel.mp3

MELMOTH has _NEVER_ in his life listened any mp3 music...and it seems
that He will *never* do it...
You to understand ?...

MELMOTH

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May 28, 2006, 12:33:50 PM5/28/06
to
Ce cher mammifère du nom de Josep Vilanova nous susurrait, le dimanche
28/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
même, et dans le message <C09F60AA.226F0%josepv...@hotmail.com>,
les doux mélismes suivants :

> How is the sound of that Manfred Symphony in the Great Conductors edition? I


> just discovered I don't have any Manfred Symph on CD and thought in buying
> it.

Rather good...
But unfortunately no organ in the last movement...

pgaron

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May 28, 2006, 12:34:23 PM5/28/06
to
What are some of the Markevitch recordings that offer the best
combination of fine performances with good, listenable sonics. Apart
from his Tchaikovsy symphony set, I don't think I own any of his
recordings.

pgaron

Josep Vilanova

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May 28, 2006, 12:42:45 PM5/28/06
to


On 28/5/06 15:20, in article 4479b19f$0$54997$dbd4...@news.wanadoo.nl,
"Gerard" <ghend...@hotmail.com> wrote:


Thanks! I think I'll buy it then.


j

John_H...@msn.com

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May 28, 2006, 12:46:45 PM5/28/06
to
You know, jrsn, over time we agree (I have all the Markevitch Marco
Polos - and they are very fine) (By the way, how does one contact a
person directly on this site; several folks have been able to get to me
but I don't know how to do it - I am quite inept on the dreaded
computer). One of the good indications of a conductor's abilities (in
my opinion), in many instances, is their mastery of an instrument and
composition. Hauser

Listener

unread,
May 28, 2006, 1:01:00 PM5/28/06
to
Haydn 103,104 and Beethoven 1 on a French Decca CD (464 094-2).
Performances from 1959/1960.

And look at Berkshire ecord Outlet for a 2 CD Living Stage set
including the Consecration of the House Overture that has been
mentioned in this and other threads. Sound quality varies.

Bill

Matthew B. Tepper

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May 28, 2006, 1:07:19 PM5/28/06
to
MELMOTH <theo...@free.fr> appears to have caused the following letters to
be typed in news:mn.e4577d653...@free.fr:

> Ce cher mammifère du nom de Gerard nous susurrait, le dimanche
> 28/05/2006, dans nos oreilles grandes ouvertes mais un peu sales quand
> même, et dans le message <447988d8$0$58648$dbd4...@news.wanadoo.nl>,
> les doux mélismes suivants :
>
>> Engineer Melmoth's Meitisinger (FFMS) Vorspiel.mp3
>
> MELMOTH has _NEVER_ in his life listened any mp3 music...and it seems
> that He will *never* do it...
> You to understand ?...

As longtime contributors to this newsgroup will agree, I took a long time
to come around to MP3s too. (The fact that they were chiefly being used to
push push push forms of music that I detest was a contributing factor.)

John_H...@msn.com

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May 28, 2006, 2:20:17 PM5/28/06
to
I am just learning about the different files for music and the computer
BUT as a friend has told me (who runs several sites that you have
probably used but never plugged due to your "ideals"); mp3 is one of
the worst types of muscial files due to compression. I have heard them
over friends computers and they are quite inferior - something to stay
away from. Hauser

Steven de Mena

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May 28, 2006, 3:43:48 PM5/28/06
to

<John_H...@msn.com> wrote in message
news:1148840417.0...@g10g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

Discussing about "MP3" files is too generic. What encoder was used and what
settings? I do not feel variable bit rate MP3 files made with recent
versions of the LAME encoder are something to "stay away from".

Steve


Message has been deleted

Raymond Hall

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May 28, 2006, 7:38:19 PM5/28/06
to
"Bob Harper" <bob.h...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:7eydneMaf_-...@comcast.com...
> Raymond Hall wrote:
>> "Vincent Ventrone" <m...@nospam.com> wrote in message
>> news:e5a91r$f32$1...@courier.brandeis.edu...

>>>> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.
>>>>
>>> I heartily recommend his Tchaikovsky set on Philips btw -- every
>>> recording in it is a gem.
>>
>>
>> Nos 4, 5 and 6 are up there with the best imo, but think that Jansons
>> wins the prize for the best 1st (Winter Daydreams) that I have heard.
>
> Have you heard Tilson Thomas/Boston? I still think it takes some beating.
>
> Bob Harper


I have heard of its credentials wrt the Tchaikovsky 1st, but haven't heard
it yet. A recording to bear in mind though.

Ray H
Taree


John_H...@msn.com

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May 28, 2006, 8:34:36 PM5/28/06
to
only if you consider sub cassette quality (and 8 track) "almost
perfect"! Hauser

Steven de Mena

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May 28, 2006, 9:21:16 PM5/28/06
to

<John_H...@msn.com> wrote in message
news:1148862876....@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> only if you consider sub cassette quality (and 8 track) "almost
> perfect"! Hauser
>

What are you replying to?? Please learn to quote.

Steve


Vaneyes

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May 28, 2006, 9:27:09 PM5/28/06
to

Bob Harper wrote:
> Raymond Hall wrote:
> > "Vincent Ventrone" <m...@nospam.com> wrote in message
> > news:e5a91r$f32$1...@courier.brandeis.edu...
> >>> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.
> >>>
> >> I heartily recommend his Tchaikovsky set on Philips btw -- every recording
> >> in it is a gem.
> >
> >
> > Nos 4, 5 and 6 are up there with the best imo, but think that Jansons wins
> > the prize for the best 1st (Winter Daydreams) that I have heard.
>
> Have you heard Tilson Thomas/Boston? I still think it takes some beating.

I had the Jansons, until MTT beat it. I had the MTT, until
Philharmonia/Muti beat it.

Regards

Johannes Roehl

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May 30, 2006, 4:59:50 AM5/30/06
to
EM schrieb:
> "Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> - 27 May 2006 09:32:14 -0700:
>
>>In the interview contained in the box, Markevitch names this (Haydn) as
>>his favorite recording. The Interview was made in 1957
>
> Perhaps it was his most recent recording then. My (Italian)
> DG/Ermitage twofer has (P) 1958, as does the La Damnation de Faust 2CD
> (also DG/Ermitage).

I believe the "Creation" was recorded a bit earlier (ca. 1952 or '54) as
it is still mono. I know that DG recorded mono still in '57, but I think
read the recording date in some discography.


Johannes

Michael Schaffer

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May 30, 2006, 6:48:38 AM5/30/06
to

Ineed, all the recordings up to 1957 are mono - and the difference in
sound quality when they went stereo is *drastic*. The mono recordings
are still listenable, though.

Edward A. Cowan

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May 30, 2006, 8:35:57 AM5/30/06
to
Particularly stunning in sound, though monophonic, is the set of
Beethoven's five piano concerti played by Wilhelm Kempff with the BPO,
cond. Paul van Kempen. (This is currently in: "Wilhelm Kempff: The
complete 1950's concerto recordings," DG Original Masters 474 024-2.)
The depth of color, the audio range, and the breadth of dynamic range
all contribute to making these recordings remarkable achievements in
the history of recordings of classical music. They date from 1953. (I
listened to no.1 last night.)

Worth recalling, btw., are the Mercury recordings of the Chicago SO,
cond. Rafael Kubilik. These are so well-recorded, though mono, that one
could be fooled into thinking they were in stereo. --E.A.C.

david...@aol.com

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May 30, 2006, 10:42:59 PM5/30/06
to

Gerard wrote:

> I think his Stravinsky recordings should be mentioned (in a thread with this
> subject line).
> Specially his recordings of Sacre du Printemps.

Yes, it's a Franco-Russian thing, which also explains his sensational
recording of Damnation de Faust, easily the best recorded performance
I've ever heard and I've just about heard 'em all. Markevitch comes
closer here to capturing the Berlioz "fire and ice" than almost anybody
else anywhere ever, by which I mean that he instinctively and
unfailingly supplies both the fairly crisp and strict framework Berlioz
demands and the febrile nervousness and volcanic expressivity at the
core of his music.

-david gable

david...@aol.com

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May 30, 2006, 10:45:52 PM5/30/06
to

Paul Kintzele wrote:

> And if you want even more intensity, try the 1953 Symphonie fantastique
> with the BPO, which burns with astonishing brightness. DG released it
> not too long ago.

Yes, it's a vast improvement over the stereo recording with the
Lamoureux, which is uncharacteristically dull and fussy and quite
unlike Markevitch's other recorded Berlioz.

-david gable

Terry

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Dec 30, 2014, 7:11:11 PM12/30/14
to
On Sunday, 28 May 2006 01:20:16 UTC+10, M forever wrote:
> I have been "rediscovering" Igor Markevitch and his fairly rich
> recorded legacy recently. In the sense that I always knew he was there
> and heard some very interesting recordings from him, but somehow it
> never occurred to me to investigate further until in a recent
> discussion, his Schubert recordings with the BP were mentioned. I
> looked it up and saw how much there is actually available from him, so
> I ordered some of the discs - the DG set "un veritable artiste", EMI
> GCOC, individual discs like PAAE and Rimsky-Korsakov works with the BP
> and Orchestre Lamoureux, and a fantastic recording of Symphonie
> fantastique with Lamoureux which for me was also a sort of rediscovery
> - I have never been too fond of the piece, but Markevitch' extremely
> lively and musically alert performance made me see it in a new light.
> I already knew his great recording of Beethoven 5 and 8 with Lamoureux,
> but even that I hadn't listened to for a long time before it was
> brought back to my attention by an online discussion.
> Amrkevitch combination of slender transparency with attention to
> lyrical lines and fine detail makes for a lot of great listening, so
> right now, I am ploughing my way through that DG box.

The Berlioz is superb, and superbly recorded, in my opinion.

Terry

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Dec 30, 2014, 7:12:52 PM12/30/14
to
On Sunday, 28 May 2006 02:32:14 UTC+10, M forever wrote:
> EM wrote:
> > "Michael Schaffer" <ms1...@gmail.com> - 27 May 2006 08:20:16 -0700:
> >
> > > Best of Igor Markevitch
> >
> > I don't like his Beethoven all that much, but I thoroughly enjoy his
> > recordings of Berlioz' La Damnation de Faust (despite it being
> > incomplete) and Haydn's Die Schöpfung (impressive "Und es war LICHT!";
> > great soloists, particularly Seefried).
> >
> > Eltjo M.
> >
> > Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
>
> In the interview contained in the box, Markevitch names this (Haydn) as
> his favorite recording. The Interview was made in 1957 in NY and oddly,
> Markevitch speaks English with a very strong French accent. I was
> surprised by this because I thought he was from Russia, but then I read
> that his family emigrated to Switzerland when he was only 2.

The Swiss conductor Oleg Caetani is in fact the son of Igor Markevich. He chose to use his mother's maiden name to avoid odious comparisons.
Message has been deleted

gggg...@gmail.com

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Dec 31, 2014, 3:23:12 AM12/31/14