conductors as composers

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Gerard

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Jul 31, 2016, 5:06:13 AM7/31/16
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Yesterday I found - in a jazz cd store - a recording of 2 works by the
_composer_ Skrowaczewski.
His Concerto Nicolò (with Gary Graffman on piano), and his Concerto for
Orchestra.
I've listened to the piano concerto, but wasn't very impressed - maybe
later.

Which other famous conductors have written music, and are there some works
that really are worth acquiring?

I'm NOT talking about famous composers who also did conducting, like Mahler,
Bernstein, Boulez; but rather conductors like Dorati, Klemperer, Markevich.
I suppose there are many others.
But did they write great works?

Raymond Hall

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Jul 31, 2016, 8:01:16 AM7/31/16
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Salonen, who admires John Adams, has written works in a similar minimalist-type vein, and is writing a cello concerto as I write. Time will tell about greatness though.

Ray Hall, Taree

Gerard

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Jul 31, 2016, 9:23:27 AM7/31/16
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"Raymond Hall" wrote in message
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=============

Right. I have - since many years - a cd with a few pieces by him, one of
those named "LA Variations".
I don't remember how that one was. I should listen again of course.

cooper...@gmail.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 9:46:51 AM7/31/16
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Skrowaczewski wrote a nice Concerto for English Horn; there was a good recording that apparently remains in LP limbo (https://www.discogs.com/Mayer-Skrowaczewski-Two-Pastels-Andante-For-Strings-Concerto-For-English-Horn-and-Orchestra/release/7706780). The coupled Mayer works are better; he's a composer who deserves to be better known.

I enjoy some of Martinon's and Markevitch's compositions, but great? I dunno.

AC

MiNe109

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:16:26 AM7/31/16
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Double bassists prize Koussevitzky's concerto.

Stephen
Message has been deleted

clem...@gmail.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:27:22 AM7/31/16
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I think Salonen's music sounds more like Rautavaara (his teacher) or Dutilleux (who he has championed) or Magnus Lindberg (his classmate at the Sibelius Academy.) Moderate modernism in the post-Debussy continuum. Rather good stuff, actually.

Terry

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:53:08 AM7/31/16
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Willem van Otterloo composed some very worthwhile music, as did Eugene Goossens and Lorin Maazel. I have a feeling that Igor Markevich was a composer as well as a conductor. I guess we don't get to hear their works often enough to be able to learn to appreciate them. I heard van Otterloo conduct one of his pieces - for about a dozen wind instruments - and thought it was pretty good.

Gerard

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Jul 31, 2016, 12:09:59 PM7/31/16
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"Terry" wrote in message
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=================================

Probably that was his (Otterloo's) Sinfonietta.
I have heard him conducting it as well. And I was very disappointed.
Because the orchestra should have played Sinfonietta by Janacek. That was on
the program.
But they did not play it because not all brass players would fit on the
podium.
Nota bene in a hall were they had played many years already.

Later I had a LP with that Sinfonietta. OK, it was pretty good. But no
Janacek!




Randy Lane

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Jul 31, 2016, 12:24:24 PM7/31/16
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Furtwangler composed some symphonies.
And then there's the highly prolific Lief Segerstam. There's 300 pieces attributed to him listed here:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_symphonies_by_Leif_Segerstam

Gerard

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Jul 31, 2016, 12:27:58 PM7/31/16
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"Randy Lane" wrote in message
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==================

Thanks. How could I forget those two?

Is there any great symphony by Leif (not Lief) Segerstam?

Kerrison

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Jul 31, 2016, 1:16:13 PM7/31/16
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Interesting topic. I'm surprised no-one's ever come up with a CD or two of Conductors' Compositions. I suppose the answer is that on the whole they didn't write "great works." Still, the conductors who also composed included Albert Coates, Antal Dorati, Eugene Goossens, Otto Klemperer, Paul Kletzki, Rafael Kubelik, Rene Leibowitz, Jean Martinon, Igor Markevitch, Malcolm Sargent, Jose Serebrier, Constantin Silvestri, Giuseppe Sinopoli, Stanislav Skrowaczewski, Frederick Stock, Leopold Stokowski and Felix Weingartner, as well as the afore-mentioned Furtwangler, Koussevitzky and so on. Some of their works have been recorded or broadcast and some of these can be found on You Tube.

For example, here is Stokowski's youthful but very assured student "Symphony" (in fact it's a 15-minute tone-poem) ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXr2R5OsMh0

Klemperer's "Merry Waltz" ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hqggjg07IH4

Martinon's "Overture to a Greek Tragedy" ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6GmuxvmEh0

Sargent's "Impression on a Windy Day" ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0h79mIoHaE

Weingartner's "Merry Overture" ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2qPcPjVph4

Markevitch's Concert Waltz "Le Bleu Danube" after the Celebrated Themes of Johann Strauss ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNKSPd_SbRo

Kletzki's Three Preludes for Piano ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrIhbeYnDi0

Goossens "Tam O'Shanter" Scherzo after Burns ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pG1DZ-CV9tc

And so on. I dare say there are other such composers' pieces on You Tube but those will keep you going for a while! Personally, I think a CD compendium of their best short and most attractive pieces might well be of interest.

dk

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Jul 31, 2016, 1:21:28 PM7/31/16
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Furtwaengler wrote 3 symphonies. I wouldn't call them great
but they are interesting. They sound like digests of all the
German composers who preceded him rolled into single works.

dk

Gerard

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Jul 31, 2016, 2:30:14 PM7/31/16
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"Kerrison" wrote in message
news:230a6d9a-51dd-409c...@googlegroups.com...
===============

Thanks.
This will keep me busy for a while indeed.

Kerrison

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Jul 31, 2016, 2:54:52 PM7/31/16
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>
> ===============
>
> Thanks.
> This will keep me busy for a while indeed.

I forgot Paul Paray, who recorded his own "Mass" for Mercury. Other names to be added, though I haven't yet checked You Tube for them, include George Szell, Sergiu Celibidache, Dimitri Mitropoulos, Nikolai Malko, Evgeny Svetlanov, Victor da Sabata and Leonard Slatkin. I suppose if there were any "hidden masterpieces" there we'd know about them by now!

s888...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 3:02:06 PM7/31/16
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Salonen was a composer first who only took up conducting in order to get his compositions played. I very much like his piano concerto among other things

Dontait...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 3:54:09 PM7/31/16
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Yet more names (if not yet cited), this time from the past: Hans Pfitzner, Leo Blech, Max von Schillings, and Sir Hamilton Harty.

Don Tait

Dontait...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 3:56:41 PM7/31/16
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And I forgot Gabriel Pierne.

Don Tait

Dontait...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 4:03:15 PM7/31/16
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And...Walter Damrosch and Howard Hanson.

Don T.

Randy Lane

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Jul 31, 2016, 4:06:39 PM7/31/16
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Have we all forgotten Lenny as a composer?

Arno Schuh

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Jul 31, 2016, 4:41:42 PM7/31/16
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And of course you mean so called classical music, didn't you?
I ask because you came from a look into the jazz area of the shop.
Of course in jazz, light music, easy listening, symphonic brass etc. for a
lot of pieces cconductors and composers are two in person. How important
these pieces are ...
And appart from conductors - there are organists alive who wrote organ
music, i. e. Guy Bovet, Jean Guillou, Lionel Rogg, Noel Rawsthorne and many
more.. Music that isn't very known in public but is used and played from
other organists, too, and well known in the organ scene.

Arno

ljk...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 7:11:03 PM7/31/16
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Constant Lambert -- equally distinguished as composer and conductor IMO.

Larry Kart

Andrew Clarke

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Jul 31, 2016, 7:54:50 PM7/31/16
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On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 7:06:13 PM UTC+10, Gerard wrote:
> Yesterday I found - in a jazz cd store - a recording of 2 works by the
> _composer_ Skrowaczewski.
> His Concerto Nicolò (with Gary Graffman on piano), and his Concerto for
> Orchestra.
> I've listened to the piano concerto, but wasn't very impressed - maybe
> later.
>
> Which other famous conductors have written music, and are there some works
> that really are worth acquiring?
>

Anthony Collins, now best known for 'Vanity Fair' in the 'Light Music' genre:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2F8DfklrJI

Andrew Clarke
Canberra

Juan I. Cahis

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Jul 31, 2016, 7:56:39 PM7/31/16
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I like very much Furtwängler Symphonies when they are well performed, like
by Barenboim or Asahina on the Second, or by Sawalisch on the Third.

--
Enviado desde mi iPad usando NewsTap, Juan I. Cahis, Santiago de Chile.

Randy Lane

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Jul 31, 2016, 8:40:21 PM7/31/16
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Does anyone favor any Bernstein works not conducted/performed by Bernstein?

dk

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Jul 31, 2016, 8:53:24 PM7/31/16
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Best known for his Sibelius symphony cycle.

dk

ljk...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 9:28:04 PM7/31/16
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"Rio Grande" is the work that made Constant Lambert famous, and it's a blast, but my favorite Lambert work is his Concerto for Piano and Nine Instruments. Somewhat jazz-influenced (Lambert wrote insightfully about jazz and Duke Ellington in particular) and dedicated to Lambert's close friend and fellow composer Philip Heseltine (Peter Warlock), a suicide, it's one of the most deeply melancholic pieces of music I know. There's a good recording on Hyperion, but my favorite is one on LP (not reissued on CD, I believe) with Richard Rodney Bennett as the soloist. Himself a composer with jazz affinities, Rodney Bennett grasps the works elusive blend of gaiety and despair completely.

Larry Kart

ljk...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:44:39 PM7/31/16
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On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 8:28:04 PM UTC-5, ljk...@aol.com wrote:
> "Rio Grande" is the work that made Constant Lambert famous, and it's a blast, but my favorite Lambert work is his Concerto for Piano and Nine Instruments. Somewhat jazz-influenced (Lambert wrote insightfully about jazz and Duke Ellington in particular) and dedicated to Lambert's close friend and fellow composer Philip Heseltine (Peter Warlock), a suicide, it's one of the most deeply melancholic pieces of music I know. There's a good recording on Hyperion, but my favorite is one on LP (not reissued on CD, I believe) with Richard Rodney Bennett as the soloist. Himself a composer with jazz affinities, Rodney Bennett grasps the works elusive blend of gaiety and despair completely.
>
> Larry Kart

Oops -- the Rodney Bennett recording of the Lambert Concerto is on CD:

https://www.amazon.com/British-Piano-Music-20s-30s/dp/B000005GSH/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1470019333&sr=1-2&keywords=richard+rodney+bennett+lambert

ljk...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:47:26 PM7/31/16
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It's also on YouTube.

cooper...@gmail.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:47:37 PM7/31/16
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On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 8:40:21 PM UTC-4, Randy Lane wrote:
> Does anyone favor any Bernstein works not conducted/performed by Bernstein?

Sure. Start with Tilson Thomas's West Side Story (Bernstein's masterpiece, afaic). Also Perlman/Ozawa or (sleeper alert!) Gluzman/Neschling in the Serenade. James Judd's recordings of the first two symphonies for Naxos are at least the equal of the composer's, imo. And Eiji Oue's miscellany on Reference including excerpts from Candide, the Divertimento, and the Mass Meditations is terrific.

AC

Terry

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Jul 31, 2016, 10:51:39 PM7/31/16
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I hate programme changes.

ljk...@aol.com

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Jul 31, 2016, 11:25:13 PM7/31/16
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More top-drawer Lambert, Summer's Last Will and Testament:

https://www.amazon.com/Constant-Lambert-Summers-Testament-Heroique/dp/B000002ZQN/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1470021551&sr=1-3&keywords=constant+lambert

BTW, don't confuse Lambert's Piano Concerto (an early work) with his Concerto for Piano and Nine Instruments. Both works are on Hyperion, but the former is coupled with "Prizefight" and the marvelously titled "Mr. Bear Squash You All Flat," the latter with Lambert's excellent Piano Sonata.

Larry Kart

Kerrison

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Aug 1, 2016, 1:09:06 AM8/1/16
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I suppose Morton Gould comes under the heading of 50% conductor / 50% composer, as he not only wrote symphonies, concertos, ballet, film and theatre music, but also made splendid recordings of the music of others. The recent Gould / Chicago SO boxed set is a case in point, with a terrific Nielsen 2nd Symphony, but also first-rate performances of music by Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Miaskovsky, Copland and Ives.

Similarly, Jose Serebrier has recorded Glazunov and Dvorak cycles, along with several CDs of Stokowski Transcriptions, as well as his own music, which includes several symphonies and concertos. However, I imagine the chief interest here is in the music of those who might be called 100% conductors, being those solely remembered today for their conducting, like Klemperer and Stokowski, rather than for any music they may have written.

Andrew Clarke

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Aug 1, 2016, 3:36:40 AM8/1/16
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Best known among the cognoscenti for his Sibelius cycle, but best known for 'Vanity Fair' everywhere else. He must have made far, far more from royalties on that much-broadcast miniature than he did from the entire Sibelius cycle.

It's up there with 'Elizabethan Serenade' and 'Coronation Scot' in the light music Top Twenty.

Andrew Clarke
Canberra


Gerard

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Aug 1, 2016, 5:38:47 AM8/1/16
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"Randy Lane" wrote in message
news:5fa146ad-d8db-41f9...@googlegroups.com...

Have we all forgotten Lenny as a composer?

======================

He was mentioned (and excluded) in the OP.

Kerrison

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Aug 1, 2016, 7:45:46 AM8/1/16
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If you click this link and scroll down and then click the little red "play" triangles, you'll hear the first 30 seconds of each of George Szell's "Variations on an Original Theme." These owe nothing to Elgar but rather suggest that "Till Eulenspiegel" had taken tea with Prokofiev ...

http://www.classicalarchives.com/work/397205.html



Gerard

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Aug 1, 2016, 12:24:48 PM8/1/16
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"Kerrison" wrote in message
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======================

Thanks,

This sounds very "gemütlich".
Brahms-like at first with a touch of Prokofiev indeed, and a little Dvorak
too.
Some kind of Szell's Haydn Variations.
Very different from Skrowaczewski's works.



number_six

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Aug 2, 2016, 10:41:46 PM8/2/16
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On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 6:46:51 AM UTC-7, cooper...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 5:06:13 AM UTC-4, Gerard wrote:
> > Yesterday I found - in a jazz cd store - a recording of 2 works by the
> > _composer_ Skrowaczewski.
> > His Concerto Nicolò (with Gary Graffman on piano), and his Concerto for
> > Orchestra.
> > I've listened to the piano concerto, but wasn't very impressed - maybe
> > later.
> >
> > Which other famous conductors have written music, and are there some works
> > that really are worth acquiring?
> >
> > I'm NOT talking about famous composers who also did conducting, like Mahler,
> > Bernstein, Boulez; but rather conductors like Dorati, Klemperer, Markevich.
> > I suppose there are many others.
> > But did they write great works?
>
> Skrowaczewski wrote a nice Concerto for English Horn; there was a good recording that apparently remains in LP limbo (https://www.discogs.com/Mayer-Skrowaczewski-Two-Pastels-Andante-For-Strings-Concerto-For-English-Horn-and-Orchestra/release/7706780). The coupled Mayer works are better; he's a composer who deserves to be better known.
>
> I enjoy some of Martinon's and Markevitch's compositions, but great? I dunno.
>
> AC

I see Martinon vico 2, played by Szeryng, was on an LP with Berg's vico.

But when DG issued a CD in the 20th century series, Martinon didn't make the cut.

Berg vico was combined with Schoenberg pico and vico on CD.

Martinon might be in an Eloquence box?

cooper...@gmail.com

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Aug 3, 2016, 8:56:28 AM8/3/16
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The VC#2 is in the Eloquence set of Martinon's DG recordings (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/135748/Jean-Martinon-Violin-Concerto-Op-51). Since the work was conducted by Kubelik it's also included in the Kubelik "Original Masters" box (same Presto link, and Presto offers lossless downloads of individual works). There's also a live Ferras performance on Doremi that I have not heard. The Symphony #4 is included in the box of Martinon's CSO recordings. In Hurwitz's memorable description, "Martinon’s own Symphony No. 4 is a predictably colorful but patchy piece, sort of like Dutilleux on an off day." A bit nasty but he's not wrong. The Violin Concerto is a better piece, and the excellent performance doesn't hurt. There have been recordings of a few chamber works as well. I know I've heard the FAQ performance of one of Martinon's String Quartets, but I retain no impression of it at all.

AC

Ricardo Jimenez

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Aug 3, 2016, 10:20:25 AM8/3/16
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On Sun, 31 Jul 2016 11:06:02 +0200, "Gerard"
<ghendriks_...@live.com> wrote:

>Yesterday I found - in a jazz cd store - a recording of 2 works by the
>_composer_ Skrowaczewski.
>His Concerto Nicolò (with Gary Graffman on piano), and his Concerto for
>Orchestra.
>I've listened to the piano concerto, but wasn't very impressed - maybe
>later.
>
>Which other famous conductors have written music, and are there some works
>that really are worth acquiring?
>
>I'm NOT talking about famous composers who also did conducting, like Mahler,
>Bernstein, Boulez; but rather conductors like Dorati, Klemperer, Markevich.
>I suppose there are many others.
>But did they write great works?

I have an enjoyable disc of music by famous conductors that includes
orchestral works by Han von Bülow, Felix Weingartner, George Szell and
Robert Heger. The conductor is Leon Botstein. There is also a
performance in my collection by Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago
Symphony of Fürtwangler's symphony #2. I don't find that work
attractive at all.

Kerrison

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Aug 3, 2016, 11:55:41 AM8/3/16
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> I have an enjoyable disc of music by famous conductors that includes
> orchestral works by Han von Bülow, Felix Weingartner, George Szell and
> Robert Heger. The conductor is Leon Botstein. There is also a
> performance in my collection by Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago
> Symphony of Fürtwangler's symphony #2. I don't find that work
> attractive at all.

Mention of Weingartner sent me again to You Tube where there are complete uploads of several of his symphonies (Nos. 1 - 7). However, what then popped up, somewhat surprisingly, was something not yet mentioned here, the hour-long Symphony No. 1 by Bruno Walter. For one listener, at any rate, I fear it does not fall into the category of "great music" or indeed "a forgotten masterpiece."

It would seem that in the case of most of these conductors, I believe the expression is: "A cobbler should stick to his last." Having said that, I think Stokowski's quarter-hour "Symphony" deserves its US Premiere at some point!

Anyway, here is the Bruno Walter Symphony for your delectation and I won't be surprised if someone says "watered-down Mahler" ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=471zudbaVk4

Raymond Hall

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Aug 3, 2016, 2:03:52 PM8/3/16
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Actually, it seems to me that without any doubt, Mahler himself wins the prize of great conductor AND great composer. Shame that we are unable to hear the results of his conducting.

Maybe someone should nominate a thread for greatness in conducting AND as a player of an instrument. Here, the list would be long, and probably highly contentious. ;)

Ray Hall, Taree

O

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Aug 3, 2016, 3:27:20 PM8/3/16
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In article <86942027-6f17-4488...@googlegroups.com>,
Raymond Hall <raymon...@bigpond.com> wrote:


> Maybe someone should nominate a thread for greatness in conducting AND as a
> player of an instrument. Here, the list would be long, and probably highly contentious. ;)

So many pianists have used the keyboard as a springboard to conducting
(afraid of losing their chops?) that it would be quite a broad list.

Perhaps we could limit it to those who made their name conducting first:

Bernstein
MTT

are two I can think of...

-Owen

Gerard

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Aug 3, 2016, 3:41:46 PM8/3/16
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"Raymond Hall" wrote in message
news:86942027-6f17-4488...@googlegroups.com...


Actually, it seems to me that without any doubt, Mahler himself wins the
prize of great conductor AND great composer. Shame that we are unable to
hear the results of his conducting.

=======================

Sure, but he was excluded in the OP.
Like all famous composers who conducted.


-------------------------------------
Maybe someone should nominate a thread for greatness in conducting AND as a
player of an instrument. Here, the list would be long, and probably highly
contentious. ;)
============================

That would be a very long list.
Why not start with only ONE instrument, like the trumpet?



cooper...@gmail.com

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Aug 3, 2016, 4:05:12 PM8/3/16
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You mean someone who continues both to perform at a high level and also conduct. Zoltan Kocsis comes immediately to mind (great pianist, exciting conductor), but you're right that there are many others. There is an amusing story about Andris Nelsons picking up "the instrument of his youth" for the first time in many years in today's NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/arts/music/andris-nelsons-tanglewood-boston-symphony-orchestra-wagner-parsifal-bayreuth.html?_r=0

AC

jrsnfld

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Aug 3, 2016, 4:24:42 PM8/3/16
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Why settle for two out of three?

Maazel, who was mentioned earlier in the thread, is on CD as the soloist in his own violin concerto, and he won many plaudits on the instrument at an early age. However, he never quite focused on it. Few are his equal as a triple whammy--maybe Bernstein and Previn. I'm not sure what to say about Mitropoulos as a composer--certainly he's worth a listen--but he obviously abandoned that for greatness as a conductor, and he was a virtuoso pianist. Paul Hindemith was regarded as a leading violist and the few documents I've heard of his conducting other people's music (Beethoven, Bruckner) are impressive.

I understand that Bruno Maderna was a violin soloist prodigy before becoming a leading composer of his day. Meanwhile, he was one of the greatest conductors of the 20th Century.

Sawallisch may or may not be your idea of a great conductor, but he certainly reached the pinnacle of the profession. He was a great accompanist at the piano (his infamous "Wagner in a Snowstorm" concert was a pianistic highlight from his Philadelphia days.)

Van Zweden was obviously a great violinist and is now well on his way to being one of the most prominent conductors of our time.

Osmo Vanska was arguably a "great" clarinetist before concentrating on conducting. Rudolf Kempe was at least equally accomplished as an oboist.

Mikhail Pletnev follows Koussevitzky and Rostropovich in the tradition of great soloists who are not always great conductors, but are at least pretty good at it and sometimes about as close to "great" as anyone gets.

I guess Barenboim is too obvious--or simply too prolific--for anyone here, but I have heard him reach greatness both as a pianist and as a conductor.

Who else

jrsnfld

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Aug 3, 2016, 4:35:16 PM8/3/16
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Indeed, Kocsis! I might include Vasary in the same elite company, although I've heard even more of Kocsis at this point...

Among the Czechs, Sejna was principal bass before moving to the podium of the Czech Phil. And Talich was also indisputably a great conductor with the highest instrumental pedigree--as concertmaster of the Berlin Phil.

Most great conductors have to learn it all...for example, Kubelik was a violin soloist, accompanied his famous father at the piano, and then of course turned out to be one of the greatest of all conductors in the 20th Century. His compositions are impressive as well.

--Jeff

Bob Harper

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Aug 3, 2016, 6:03:54 PM8/3/16
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On 8/3/16 11:03 AM, Raymond Hall wrote:
(snip)
>
> Actually, it seems to me that without any doubt, Mahler himself wins
> the prize of great conductor AND great composer. Shame that we are
> unable to hear the results of his conducting.
>
> Maybe someone should nominate a thread for greatness in conducting
> AND as a player of an instrument. Here, the list would be long, and
> probably highly contentious. ;)
>
> Ray Hall, Taree
>

Note sure about his 'greatness' as a player, but Paul Goodwin was surely
a fine oboist, and is a very fine conductor. As I believe I have
mentioned before, he gave the finest performance of 'Messiah' I have
ever heard (with the Portland Baroque Orchestra 10 or 12 years ago), and
I recently downloaded a concert of Mozart and Beethoven with the
Philadelphia Orchestra that I found excellent in all respects.

And agreed about Mahler--would that we could hear him conducting not
only his own music but Wagner and Beethoven as well!

Bob Harper

number_six

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Aug 3, 2016, 7:50:24 PM8/3/16
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On Wednesday, August 3, 2016 at 5:56:28 AM UTC-7, cooper wrote:
> snip <
> The VC#2 is in the Eloquence set of Martinon's DG recordings (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/135748/Jean-Martinon-Violin-Concerto-Op-51). Since the work was conducted by Kubelik it's also included in the Kubelik "Original Masters" box (same Presto link, and Presto offers lossless downloads of individual works). There's also a live Ferras performance on Doremi that I have not heard. The Symphony #4 is included in the box of Martinon's CSO recordings. In Hurwitz's memorable description, "Martinon’s own Symphony No. 4 is a predictably colorful but patchy piece, sort of like Dutilleux on an off day." A bit nasty but he's not wrong. The Violin Concerto is a better piece, and the excellent performance doesn't hurt. There have been recordings of a few chamber works as well. I know I've heard the FAQ performance of one of Martinon's String Quartets, but I retain no impression of it at all.
>
> AC

Thanks!

number_six

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Aug 3, 2016, 7:59:46 PM8/3/16
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I'd include Gunther Schuller among the "triple threats".

I believe Harnoncourt composed; without achieving renown in that domain, he remains an immortal figure as an instrumentalist, conductor and musicologist.

Someone mentioned Morton Gould already. I second that.

Raymond Hall

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Aug 3, 2016, 11:07:56 PM8/3/16
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On Thursday, 4 August 2016 06:24:42 UTC+10, jrsnfld wrote:

> Why settle for two out of three?
>
> Maazel, who was mentioned earlier in the thread, is on CD as the soloist in his own violin concerto, and he won many plaudits on the instrument at an early age. However, he never quite focused on it. Few are his equal as a triple whammy--maybe Bernstein and Previn.

Fully agree about Lorin Maazel. Prodigiously talented. Aka The Pittsburgh Kid.

Ray Hall, Taree

Tassilo

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Aug 3, 2016, 11:10:17 PM8/3/16
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Many a conductor has maintained reasonably respectable chops as a pianist while pursuing a career as a conductor. There's a commercial recording on, I think, French Decca from the early fifties of Mussorgsky and Stravinsky songs with Boulez accompanying a tenor soloist.

Randy Lane

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Aug 4, 2016, 12:21:25 AM8/4/16
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Bernstein recorder some Mozart Comcerto as aianist for Decca.
Solti accompanied the Melos Quartet in Mozart Piano Quartets for Decca.
And Previn recorded some chamber music on the piano with Kyung-Wha Chung.

jrsnfld

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Aug 4, 2016, 2:35:16 AM8/4/16
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Previn goes way beyond mere accompanist. He's recorded chamber music very well (his Brahms and Beethoven trios with Mullova and Schiff, for example). He's also made multiple solo discs, and earned initial fame as a jazz pianist.

--Jeff

O

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Aug 4, 2016, 10:55:01 AM8/4/16
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In article <18035a74-7720-459f...@googlegroups.com>,
To tie this thread together, Previn has a great recording of
Rachmaninoff 4 hand piano works with...Ashkenazy!

-Owen

gmu...@erols.com

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Aug 4, 2016, 12:22:40 PM8/4/16
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On Sunday, July 31, 2016 at 5:06:13 AM UTC-4, Gerard wrote:
> Yesterday I found - in a jazz cd store - a recording of 2 works by the
> _composer_ Skrowaczewski.
> His Concerto Nicolò (with Gary Graffman on piano), and his Concerto for
> Orchestra.
> I've listened to the piano concerto, but wasn't very impressed - maybe
> later.
>
> Which other famous conductors have written music, and are there some works
> that really are worth acquiring?
>
> I'm NOT talking about famous composers who also did conducting, like Mahler,
> Bernstein, Boulez; but rather conductors like Dorati, Klemperer, Markevich.
> I suppose there are many others.
> But did they write great works?

Silvestri also. Fragment from Three pieces for strings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAdYOlriSyY

Regards,

George

Kerrison

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Aug 4, 2016, 12:59:34 PM8/4/16
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> To tie this thread together, Previn has a great recording of
> Rachmaninoff 4 hand piano works with...Ashkenazy!
>
> -Owen

Of course, the one thing that Previn will forever be remembered for, in the UK at any rate, is the "Grieg Piano Concerto" sketch on the Morecambe & Wise Show some 35 years ago. It is still rated as one of the funniest TV sketches of all time. The video can be seen on this page under the comment that he is also forever known as "Mr. Preview" ...

http://www.classicfm.com/artists/andre-previn/guides/morecambe-wise-previn/#7gbU31wfqZIbj0Rb.97

Al Eisner

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Aug 4, 2016, 6:09:36 PM8/4/16
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Why not go for the quadruple whammy? Wasn't Mozart a conductor, as
well as a pianist and a violinist?
--
Al Eisner

Gerald Martin

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Aug 5, 2016, 4:06:37 PM8/5/16
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Previn also composed an opera, A Streetcar Named Desire.

JohnGavin

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Aug 6, 2016, 11:02:17 AM8/6/16
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Let's put in a good word for Rachmaninoff. There are few recorded examples of his conducting, true, but he must have been quite remarkable given that he was offered the directorship of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, which he turned down.

As a pianist, well, you know.......

Composer? Any time someone low-rates his compositions, I ask them if they know the Vespers. The answer always comes back "no".

HT

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Aug 6, 2016, 12:30:12 PM8/6/16
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> Composer? Any time someone low-rates his compositions, I ask them if they know the Vespers. The answer always comes back "no".

The Vespers! Yes! The Paganini Rhapsody. Not so much else.

Henk

Joe

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Aug 6, 2016, 1:59:51 PM8/6/16
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I've never really warmed to the symphonies or the concerti (my problem, I believe, and not the composer's) but I am very fond of the Symphonic Dances, as well as the Paganini Rhapsody and the Vespers.

Joe Markley
Plantsville, Connecticut

Gerard

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Aug 6, 2016, 6:13:43 PM8/6/16
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"HT" wrote in message
news:2facbfa9-0c1c-4845...@googlegroups.com...


> Composer? Any time someone low-rates his compositions, I ask them if
> they know the Vespers. The answer always comes back "no".

The Vespers! Yes! The Paganini Rhapsody. Not so much else.

================

Huh?
The Symphonic Dances to start with.
Then Symphony 2.


Ed Presson

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Aug 6, 2016, 6:48:42 PM8/6/16
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"Joe" wrote in message
news:7a5bd261-fc33-4ef5...@googlegroups.com...
I may have missed mention of "The Bells"-a work I like a lot.

Ed Presson


Raymond Hall

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Aug 6, 2016, 8:37:34 PM8/6/16
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On Sunday, 7 August 2016 08:48:42 UTC+10, Ed Presson wrote:
> "Joe" wrote in message
>
> On Saturday, August 6, 2016 at 12:30:12 PM UTC-4, HT wrote:
> > > Composer? Any time someone low-rates his compositions, I ask them if
> > > they know the Vespers. The answer always comes back "no".
> >
> > The Vespers! Yes! The Paganini Rhapsody. Not so much else.
> >
> > Henk
>
> >I've never really warmed to the symphonies or the concerti (my problem, I
> >believe, and not the composer's) but I am very fond of the Symphonic
> >Dances, as well as the Paganini Rhapsody and the Vespers.
>
> >Joe Markley
> >Plantsville, Connecticut
>
> I may have missed mention of "The Bells"-a work I like a lot.
>
> Ed Presson

Isle of the Dead, 3rd symphony, 4th piano concerto, Symphonic Dances. All of these mine aspects that invoke a nostalgia not based on sheer popularity.

Ray Hall, Taree

Bob Harper

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Aug 6, 2016, 11:52:39 PM8/6/16