Vineyard

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Doug Powless

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Dec 27, 1994, 2:00:24 AM12/27/94
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Hi!

I've been to this group before under a different account...

Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...

(The rest can "talk amongst yourselves") <grin>

TTYL!:-)

Timo H. Jaakkimainen

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Dec 27, 1994, 4:42:09 PM12/27/94
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In a previous posting, Doug Powless (dpow...@passport.ca) writes:
>
> I've been to this group before under a different account...
>
> Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...

Yeah sure, there are us people who are into Vineyard music (like myself).
Then, there are those who are actually part of the Vineyard church and lead
worship there and _write_ Vineyard worship songs (speaking of Kim Anthony
Gentes).

What do you want to talk about?

In short, I find Vineyard music very sincere and worshipful, more so than
Hosanna/Integrity, IMHO.

I think Langley Vineyard releases are better than Anaheim Vineyard releases.

My favourite worship leaders are Brian Doerksen, Kevin Prosch, Andy Park,
Dave Ruis, Randy & Terry Butler.

My all-time favourite worship CD (of all companies) is Langley Vineyard's
"Changed By Your Glory" (which seems to be the favourite for many people).

Bye now,
Timo
--
Timo H Jaakkimainen | | | He will never
ab...@freenet.carleton.ca | --+-- | leave or forsake you.
| | |
1 Peter 1:3-9 | | | Deuteronomy 31:6

Reuben A. Rubio II

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Dec 27, 1994, 5:30:28 PM12/27/94
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In article <3doe28$r...@passport.ca>, dpow...@passport.ca (Doug Powless) wrote:

> Hi!
>
> I've been to this group before under a different account...
>
> Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...

Sure Doug. What do you want to discuss?

I am the worship leader at our church, and I am in the process of
incorporating Vineyard tunes into our services.

--
Reub
http://www.umich.edu/~rarubio/index.html

Clif Robertson

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Dec 28, 1994, 12:23:12 PM12/28/94
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Hi, so you want to talk about Vineyard music. I have been using their
songs now for about a year. I find that the songs are more personal and
worshipful in relating not to God but to the Father. What do you think?

Clif
--

clif robe...@mindlink.bc.ca

Doug Powless

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Dec 29, 1994, 12:26:03 PM12/29/94
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Clif_Ro...@mindlink.bc.ca (Clif Robertson) wrote:

>Hi, so you want to talk about Vineyard music. I have
>been using their songs now for about a year. I find
>that the songs are more personal and worshipful in
>relating not to God but to the Father. What do you
>think?

?? I suppose it depends on your doctrine. I believe the
Father *is* God, as is the Son and Holy Spirit. But to answer
your question: there are a lot of songs concerning the
Fatherhood of God - which I *really* appreciate.

Our church has begun using Vineyard stuff for the better part
of a year now, and the worship in our church has been
absolutely *transformed*. We used to use Integrity-Hosanna,
but, personally speaking, it wasn't *nearly* as worshipful I
think, as the stuff from Vineyard. And it's not the label
"Vineyard" that does it. It's the fact that the lyrics are
written as if the people writing them have *just* been in the
presence of God. In fact, I can't see how some of these songs
*could* have been written otherwise. This music has touched me
*deeply* - more than any other music has in a long, long time.

BTW, I play the piano in our worship team. Has anyone heard the
latest offering from the Vineyard? I don't know the title of
it <frown> but it has one song which talks about Jesus on a
white horse, and the fire in His eyes being the fire of love
for His Bride. Awesome. Truly awesome!!!

shades

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Dec 29, 1994, 1:14:56 PM12/29/94
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In article <D1Ho...@freenet.carleton.ca>,

Timo H. Jaakkimainen <ab...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote:

>> Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...
>
>Yeah sure, there are us people who are into Vineyard music (like myself).
>Then, there are those who are actually part of the Vineyard church and lead
>worship there and _write_ Vineyard worship songs (speaking of Kim Anthony
>Gentes).

Man! I would *love* to be able to write some of this stuff too. (BTW,
this *is* dpowless talking to you, but under a different account - my
other one didn't even *see* your followup to my original post. But that's
another discussion....)

>In short, I find Vineyard music very sincere and worshipful, more so than
>Hosanna/Integrity, IMHO.

I absolutely agree with you! I'm a piano player at our church, and we
were into Hosanna/Integrity for a long time (a music, frankly, which I
don't care for too much) and.....*then* we got into Vineyard music. We
were a worshipping church before - but THIS transformed our services.
IMHO, I don't see how some of these songs could possibly have been
written without the writers first coming into the presence of the Lord.

I suppose other stuff leaves me cold because it is....professional,
without not a hair out of place <G>. Whereas Vineyard attempts to touch
the heart of God.

>I think Langley Vineyard releases are better than Anaheim Vineyard releases.

I've never done a comparison of the two.

>My favourite worship leaders are Brian Doerksen, Kevin Prosch, Andy Park,
>Dave Ruis, Randy & Terry Butler.

Doerksen and Prosch! Yeah!

>My all-time favourite worship CD (of all companies) is Langley Vineyard's
>"Changed By Your Glory" (which seems to be the favourite for many people).

I *think* that's the one I like the best too. But I'm not good with
names, titles or things like that. If that's the one with the long
version of "We Will Dance", then that's the one I really like. Have you
heard the very latest one? The song on this CD which captures my heart
has to do with Jesus riding a white horse, with fire in His eyes, which
is the fire of His love for His Bride. Awesome!

shades

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Dec 29, 1994, 1:19:30 PM12/29/94
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In article <rarubio-2712...@science8.soe.umich.edu>,

Reuben A. Rubio II <rar...@umich.edu> wrote:

>> Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...
>
>Sure Doug. What do you want to discuss?
>
>I am the worship leader at our church, and I am in the process of
>incorporating Vineyard tunes into our services.

Where abouts is your church? I am the pianomeister at our church and our
leader has incorporated Vineyard now for the better part of a year - and
this music has been used of the Lord to *really* transform our services.
What a difference!! (Not that we weren't worshipping before: worship is a
cornerstone to our services. In fact our leadership looks at worship not
as an "addition" to the teaching part of our services, but as an equal
part. I'm probably not explaining this properly. <G>)

David Mark Das

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Dec 29, 1994, 7:02:59 PM12/29/94
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> my question, to all the praise and worship types, and to vineyard types in
> particular, is this: what is the purpose, the vision, or whatever, of those
> who write vineyard worship music? obviously, the ultimate purpose is to
> provide songs to worship the Lord with. but a lot of the songs elicit
> personal responses...to pick examples that i'm familiar with, "light the
> fire" really doesn't strike me as a worship song at all, but a prayer. (in
> my mind, at least, there is a SIGNIFICANT difference.) the chorus of "his
> banner over me" has a line about "we can feel the love of God in this place"
> (that may not be quite right) which, i feel, is lying to God if you don't
> feel the love of God in that place. stuff like that. what's the point of
> putting lines reflecting human emotions that one may or may not feel into
> a worship song that's supposed to glorify God?

That's a good point, and one I've wondered about sometimes. I'll offer
an idea or two. First thing that comes to mind is the biblical teaching
that we are to praise and thank God no matter whether the situation is
good or bad. So really, regardless of our moods and dilemnas, we should
be thanking God. Praise and worship music does help you do that -- re-
minding you of the truths of God. Vineyard music, in particular, is more
written about a sense of a Christian community rather than word-for-word
quotes of Scripture which is common to a lot of other praise and worship
styles. That sense of Christian community -- a gathering of the body of
Christ -- is mirrored in the songs (this is assuming the community is
really united and not just going through the motions). Going through the
motions is a great danger of using contemporary praise and worship, and
inevitably some people will lose their focus on good and just sing songs
that they've memorized. I might be going against the grain in saying
this, but I'd say you should only sing the songs which you mean in your
heart, whether they be praise, worship, or prayer. I *don't* mean only
the songs you're in the mood for. "Our God is an awesome God" is one
that I'd think you could sing no matter what situation you're in, and if
you don't feel right singing those lyrics then maybe something isn't
right between you and God, and the song can bring that to light. However,
you may not forever be in the mood for singing something like "Well you
mght wonder why I'm so happy...I've just been connected to an everlasting
source of power, and that power makes me glow" and I think it is
completely valid not to sing a song like that if you are feeling defeated.
But whatever you decide, don't cause division over your preferences --
don't cause anyone to stumble in their faith. Just sing the songs that
you honestly mean from your heart, and sit out the others, and don't let
peer pressure make you feel like you should sing them. God sees your
heart, and the best thing you can do is keep yourself from hypocrisy by
singing songs you don't mean.

I know I've rambled a little...hope some of this helps!

In Jesus,
David

Douglas C Pearson

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Dec 29, 1994, 6:11:13 PM12/29/94
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these are the days that i'm glad that mess about splitting r.m.c into several
different groups didn't go through...i owe andy whitman an apology for saying
it was a good idea, i suppose...(and everybody else who opposes the split,
for that matter. who am i to say andy's the only one worth listening to on
r.m.c? anyway...before i eat my foot again...)

my question, to all the praise and worship types, and to vineyard types in
particular, is this: what is the purpose, the vision, or whatever, of those
who write vineyard worship music? obviously, the ultimate purpose is to
provide songs to worship the Lord with. but a lot of the songs elicit
personal responses...to pick examples that i'm familiar with, "light the
fire" really doesn't strike me as a worship song at all, but a prayer. (in
my mind, at least, there is a SIGNIFICANT difference.) the chorus of "his
banner over me" has a line about "we can feel the love of God in this place"
(that may not be quite right) which, i feel, is lying to God if you don't
feel the love of God in that place. stuff like that. what's the point of
putting lines reflecting human emotions that one may or may not feel into
a worship song that's supposed to glorify God?

i realize those who write worship songs for the vineyard aren't the only
people guilty of this, but vineyard songs are the ones that strike me as
having this characteristic most often.

anyway, if anybody can see through this jumbled mess and can come up with
a good answer, i'd sure appreciate. posting is fine, e-mail responses
will get answered too.

thanks,
chuck
--
"clueless chuck" aka douglas c pearson jr -- dope...@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu
osu biophysics program -- t -4 months until daddyhood!
GEEK 'TILL YOU FREAK -- old rose-hulman computer jock saying

Michael Straight

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Dec 30, 1994, 9:10:39 AM12/30/94
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In article <3dvfmh$3...@charm.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu>,
Douglas C Pearson <dope...@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu> wrote concering
Vinyard music:

>provide songs to worship the Lord with. but a lot of the songs elicit
>personal responses...to pick examples that i'm familiar with, "light the
>fire" really doesn't strike me as a worship song at all, but a prayer. (in
>my mind, at least, there is a SIGNIFICANT difference.) the chorus of "his
>banner over me" has a line about "we can feel the love of God in this place"
>(that may not be quite right) which, i feel, is lying to God if you don't
>feel the love of God in that place. stuff like that. what's the point of
>putting lines reflecting human emotions that one may or may not feel into
>a worship song that's supposed to glorify God?

I'm not a Vinyard member, but I went to one of their kinship groups in
college and really enjoyed their music. I guess that one could take the
attitude that "if I'm not glad to be singing, it's hypocracy to sing a
song that says I am" or whatever the emotion is that the song in question
talks about. But I always kind of took those songs as a reminder that,
no matter how down I might be about life, at rock bottom I do have
something to be happy about and it's not hypocracy to be legitimately
upset at the bad things happening in my life but also taking some time to
celebrate and be happy about what God has done.

Its sort of like my attitude about communion. Someone who comes from a
tradition that takes communion infrequently asked me once if I refrain
from taking communion some Sundays when my heart isn't right (refering to
Paul's admonition in 1Corinthians). I told her that, yes I have
refrained once or twice, but I usually see communion as a time to get
right with God, not something I can only participate in after I've gotten
my life together.

The same goes for worship. There's an old hymn with the line "You are
worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices." If you're not happy,
if you're not feeling good about God's love, it's worth some effort to
try to be happy and feel good about these things. Sorrow and pain are
legitimate emotions to bring to God, but I think sometimes it's good to
make an effort to realize and be glad about who God is and what he's done
for us.

All that is to say that, for me, I took those songs as expressing what I
ought to feel, what I'd like to feel, and what I frequently did feel when
I let myself think about who God is and how much I owe him and how it's
just right to get excited about him, no matter what's going on in my life.

Michael Straight "Everybody knows a little bit of something."-King's X /~\/~\
"I started to laugh but a grin took its place"|I'm not a guitar, 88======()==D
I can't get my computer to wreck a nice beach!|but I play one at church\_/\_/

Lauren Holmes

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Dec 30, 1994, 1:10:22 PM12/30/94
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My husband and I were listening to a praise tape recently during a long
drive, and had an interesting discussion about it. We both are somewhat
leery of worship that seems designed to elicit an emotional response,
which we see most "praise" music as doing -- primarily through repetition.
The effect, to us, is like a pep rally. We feel manipulated, mostly.

Every now and then, though, I enjoy a good, repetitive song and the high
it can bring. I just want to be careful not to base my faith on those
highs. Been there, done that, and it wasn't good.


--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lauren Crawford Holmes | The vitality of thought is in adventure.
lho...@mcs.com | Ideas won't keep. Something must be done
| about them. --Alfred North Whitehead

Reuben A. Rubio II

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Dec 30, 1994, 1:33:24 PM12/30/94
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First of all, I think it should be said that there is nothing inherently
"holier" about Vineyard releases than Integrity releases. There is
certainly a distinct style associated with each, but I would not want to
overspiritualize things too much here. I try to take each release for what
it is. I also should say that I find a good source for inspiration of what
works in worship from the PromiseKeepers CDs (I was at Boulder '93 and
Indianapolis '94, and my sights are set on Detroit '95), which are
produced by Maranatha.

To me, the renewal of contemporary praise music pioneered in the 60s and
70s had three important aspects which made it especially welcome. First of
all, the tunes were based on scripture or on scriptural principles - very
plainly so - but they were dialogue-based (something you sang to God)
rather than proclamatory. Second, the tunes were easy to sing - the key
was comfortable for regular people, and the melody and lyrics matched up
well syllabically. Third, the tunes were easy to play - you could whoop it
up w/ just a guitar or piano, or you could use more elaborate
orchestration. Three - b: there was/is room in the tunes for lots of vocal
& instrumental expression, and perhaps an eye towards medleying certain
songs was cast.

I would wonder if the Integrity tunes are a bit too technically demanding,
and cause the worship team to try and play it "cool, like the tape/CD"
rather than just try to worship God. Sometimes if we (or a congregation)
thinks a song is too difficult, we/they will just veg and listen rather
than participate. I think the recasting of some Integrity tunes with
simpler orchestration in the "Praise and Worship for Small Groups" series
underscores that those tunes are just as worshipful as anything else as
long as they are put together to inspire rather than intimidate.

Four Vineyard tunes that our church has especially enjoyed this year are
"Refiner's Fire", "Cry of My Heart", "At the Cross", and "Holy, Holy,
Holy."

I'll just throw this out for free - I think that Vineyard-type tunes are
great for teaching you how to worship, but they cannot be the summation of
our worship experience. We need hymns (oh, how worshipful they are when we
have learned how to worship!!), and we need some "let's go out and kick
Satan's rear end" classic Integrity-type rowdiness as well. Guess what? We
even need some leg-liftin', foot-stompin' Pentecostal
bluegrass/country/Hebrew-holy-hop stuff as well (tunes **so** simple that
your brain shuts down so that the rest of your body can have fun dancing).
Worship can be fun when its diverse (often we stand a classic tune on its
head with a reggae, latin, hip-hop, hard rock, or jazz style).

--
Reub
http://www.umich.edu/~rarubio/index.html

shades

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Dec 31, 1994, 3:54:36 PM12/31/94
to
Reuben: thank you for your response! I'm not sure I can add much to
that which you've written concerning Vineyard music. (But hey! I'm
going to try! <grin>)

Reuben A. Rubio II <rar...@umich.edu> wrote:

>First of all, I think it should be said that there is nothing inherently
>"holier" about Vineyard releases than Integrity releases. There is

Agreed. I shouldn't have used the whitewash method of approach here.
Let me be more specific: no other music has affected me in the emotions
*and* thought as Vineyard music. And frankly, the music style of much
of Integrity/Hosanna has grated on my ears. Yes, a lot of it is heavy
into the technical intracacies which I can handle, but it just
doesn't sound that good to me. This is not to say that Integrity's all
that bad, this is just the effect it has had on me personally. I hope
that doesn't offend anyone - such is not my intent.

>it is. I also should say that I find a good source for inspiration of what
>works in worship from the PromiseKeepers CDs (I was at Boulder '93 and
>Indianapolis '94, and my sights are set on Detroit '95), which are
>produced by Maranatha.

Oh man! This year it's going to be closer to Canada than I've ever
seen. I would *love* to attend this! Make I ask a favour? If you have
any information on this year's PK, would you mind emailing me about it?

>To me, the renewal of contemporary praise music pioneered in the 60s and
>70s had three important aspects which made it especially welcome. First of

I like your analysis here. In fact, the music of the late 60's/early
70's was *very* appealing to me (and I see the styles reflected in
current Vineyard) precisely for the reasons you stated.

>Four Vineyard tunes that our church has especially enjoyed this year are
>"Refiner's Fire", "Cry of My Heart", "At the Cross", and "Holy, Holy,
>Holy."

Have you heard the latest CD, called "The River is Wide"? (I think
that's the name: it has "I Receive" and "We Will Ride" on it)

>I'll just throw this out for free - I think that Vineyard-type tunes are
>great for teaching you how to worship, but they cannot be the summation of
>our worship experience. We need hymns (oh, how worshipful they are when we
>have learned how to worship!!), and we need some "let's go out and kick
>Satan's rear end" classic Integrity-type rowdiness as well. Guess what? We
>even need some leg-liftin', foot-stompin' Pentecostal
>bluegrass/country/Hebrew-holy-hop stuff as well (tunes **so** simple that
>your brain shuts down so that the rest of your body can have fun dancing).

<heh heh> I agree totally! Our worship team is starting to get into a
little bit of rock, to go along with some of the more slow and
worshipful songs. You wouldn't believe what we did with "Written in the
Word" <WIDE GRIN>.

>Worship can be fun when its diverse (often we stand a classic tune on its
>head with a reggae, latin, hip-hop, hard rock, or jazz style).

That was one of the things I noticed back in the 70's, and am glad to
see happening now...

shades

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Jan 1, 1995, 4:55:35 AM1/1/95
to
Hi Jane!

Fancy meeting you here!

So....what's your favourite Vineyard CD? Mine is "River of Life" (I
*think* that's the name of it!) Favourite songs: "I receive" and "We
Will Ride".

Jane Rema

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Jan 1, 1995, 12:06:24 AM1/1/95
to
>Newsgroups: rec.music.christian
>Subject: Vineyard


DP>Is anyone here into Vineyard music? If so, let's discuss...

YES! Kevin Prosch is my favorite..... Shout to the Lord is good!


Doug Powless

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Jan 1, 1995, 4:19:39 PM1/1/95
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Hi all!

Well, it wasn't my intention to insult others by stating my
preference for Vineyard music over Integrity/Hosanna. That's
just my preference, and as is said elsewhere: there's no
accounting for taste. <grin>

The responses here have been great (oh hi Carolyn!!!), which
speaks well, I think of the Christian community over
cyperspace.

I hope everyone here has a happy and prosperous New Year!

Reuben A. Rubio II

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Jan 2, 1995, 2:57:49 PM1/2/95
to
Sorry about that previous message. I hit the "send" key before I typed anything.

The Detroit PK '95 will be held on the Fri/Sat of the last weekend in
April (I think that is the 27th/28th - check your calendar to make sure of
the right date, but the days I've given are correct).

If you want registration info, let me know and I'll send it along.

--
Reub
http://www.umich.edu/~rarubio/index.html

Reuben Rubio

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Jan 2, 1995, 7:39:14 PM1/2/95
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In article <rarubio-0201...@science8.soe.umich.edu>,

rar...@umich.edu (Reuben A. Rubio II) wrote:

> Sorry about that previous message. I hit the "send" key before I typed
anything.
>
> The Detroit PK '95 will be held on the Fri/Sat of the last weekend in
> April (I think that is the 27th/28th - check your calendar to make sure of
> the right date, but the days I've given are correct).
>
> If you want registration info, let me know and I'll send it along.

FYI - this posting grew out of a side comment an another thread regarding
Vineyard tunes (just so it's understood that there was some relevance
here).

Here are the *tentative* sites for Promise Keepers '95. Things will be
finalized by Feb according to the mailer I received a couple of weeks ago,
and registration forms sent out at that time.

Detroit (Silverdome), 4/28-29
LA (Coliseum), 5/5-6
Boise (Boise Hawks Stadium), 5/19-20
DC (RFK Stadium), 5/26-27
Houston (Astrodome), 6/2-3
Denver (Mile High), 6/16-17
Indianapolis (Hoosier Dome), 6/23-24
Atlanta (Georgia Dome), 6/30-7/1
Seattle (Kingdome), 7/7-8
Minneapolis (Metrodome), 7/14-15
St. Petersburg (Thunderdome), 8/4-5
San Francisco (Oakland-Alameda County Stadium), 9/29-30
Dallas (Texas Stadium) - sometime in the fall

More info can be had from the following address:
Promise Keepers
PO Box 18376
Boulder, CO 80308
1-303-421-2800

The worship we enjoyed at PK '93 in Boulder and at PK '94 was beyond
description. Regardless of your taste in music, you would have been
stirred at the passion of 62,000 men in the Hoosier Dome singing "Holy,
Holy, Holy" (the hymn) a capella. SCC showed up at Indy last year and gave
an impromptu concert after dinner, and Larnell Harris and Steve Green sang
a very moving song about racial healing. Special music was by the
Maranatha! Praise Band, led primarily by Morris Chapman, Terry Clark, and
Eddie Espinosa.

The Silverdome holds 80,000. If we can pack the place (something the Lions
can never do), LOOK OUT!!

--
Reub
rar...@umich.edu
http://www.umich.edu/~rarubio/Index.html

Kim Anthony Gentes

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Jan 4, 1995, 1:00:55 PM1/4/95
to

In article <3durfb$l...@passport.ca>, dpow...@passport.ca (Doug Powless) writes:
|>
|>
|> Clif_Ro...@mindlink.bc.ca (Clif Robertson) wrote:
|>
|> >Hi, so you want to talk about Vineyard music. I have
|> >been using their songs now for about a year. I find
|> >that the songs are more personal and worshipful in
|> >relating not to God but to the Father. What do you
|> >think?
|>
[snip]

|>
|> BTW, I play the piano in our worship team. Has anyone heard the
|> latest offering from the Vineyard? I don't know the title of

The title of the album is "The River Is Here" (TFH#20)

|> it <frown> but it has one song which talks about Jesus on a
|> white horse, and the fire in His eyes being the fire of love
|> for His Bride. Awesome. Truly awesome!!!


The song is called "We Will Ride", and it is written by Andy Park
the worship pastor from the Anahiem Vineyard.

You are right, it is an awesome "call to commitment" song.

--
Kim Anthony Gentes +-----------------------------------+
Honeywell IAC, Phoenix, AZ | My motto : |
kge...@ips.iac.honeywell.com | "If you can't, understand it." |
+-----------------------------------+

Kim Anthony Gentes

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Jan 4, 1995, 12:56:57 PM1/4/95
to
In article <61619-7...@mindlink.bc.ca>, Clif_Ro...@mindlink.bc.ca (Clif Robertson) writes:
|> Hi, so you want to talk about Vineyard music. I have been using their
|> songs now for about a year. I find that the songs are more personal and
|> worshipful in relating not to God but to the Father. What do you think?
|>
|> Clif
|> --
|>

I'd agree. I used to use mostly fast, cut-time, marches (like "I Will
Celebrate"). These were great for faith building and encouragement,
but it seemed that I personally focus more on God in when using
simpler "love songs" to God. I know this is not true for everyone,
so I'm not trying to say this is a blanket truth, just something that
works to point me more towards Jesus. And isn't that what it is all
about?

Douglas C Pearson

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Jan 7, 1995, 7:17:14 PM1/7/95
to
Michael Straight <mstr...@nyx10.cs.du.edu> wrote lots of good things,
especially:

>The same goes for worship. There's an old hymn with the line "You are
>worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices." If you're not happy,
>if you're not feeling good about God's love, it's worth some effort to
>try to be happy and feel good about these things. Sorrow and pain are
>legitimate emotions to bring to God, but I think sometimes it's good to
>make an effort to realize and be glad about who God is and what he's done
>for us.

michael, i've had this message marked for quite some time, trying to figure out
how to dispute it, and i can't. it's one of the most clueful statements i've
seen on this group in ages, and one i desperately needed to hear.

thanks, bro.

listening to some good gospel on "a prairie home companion,"

KyeChung

unread,
Jan 9, 1995, 8:22:49 PM1/9/95
to
I like that album too. But my favorite (by far) has to be "Light the Fire
Again." I also like the album "Changed by Your Glory" put out by Langley
Vineyard. The arrangements on that album are neat (coming from a praise
band leader's perspective). Although, i do believe that the Langley
Vineyard (Canada) recordings are not as pure and rich as the Anhehim
Recordings (or Touching the Father's Heart Series) .... What do you guys
or gals think???

Kye Chung

p.s. I am finding more and more things on internet partaining to vineyard
and it fasinates me ... where else can i read more about the music
ministry and the church fellowship?

David Mark Das

unread,
Jan 10, 1995, 11:58:09 AM1/10/95
to
> p.s. I am finding more and more things on internet partaining to vineyard
> and it fasinates me ... where else can i read more about the music
> ministry and the church fellowship?

The Vineyard Christian Fellowship is a movement that has really
captivated me as a Christian, not necessarily that I make gods
out of the leaders (as some seem to do), but that it has opened
my eyes to allowing a God who works miracles into my life. They
have an 800 number...call 1-800-555-1212 and ask for Vineyard
Ministries International, and then call them and ask for a catalog.
They have lots of books and CDs available. Two notable books I'd
highly recommend are John Wimber's Power Healing, and a compilation
of writings entitled The Kingdom And The Power, edited by Gary S.
Greig and Kevin Springer.

In Him,
David

Jonathan Reid

unread,
Jan 10, 1995, 2:10:29 PM1/10/95
to
kyec...@aol.com (KyeChung) writes:
>p.s. I am finding more and more things on internet partaining to vineyard
>and it fasinates me ... where else can i read more about the music
>ministry and the church fellowship?

My church, the Champaign Vineyard, has a Web site you can check out:
http://groke.beckman.uiuc.edu/Vineyard/

Jon Reid A Champaign Vineyard Small Group Coordinator
jr...@cs.uiuc.edu CELL-CHURCH e-mail list owner

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