1971 Beatles Album

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DaveInMn

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Apr 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM4/28/96
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How about nominations for songs on a "fantasy" album "released" by the
Beatles in 1971? Here are a few songs for consideration:

Imagine
All Things Must Pass
Every Night
It Don't Come Easy
What is Life?
Maybe I'm Amazed
Jealous Guy

Mattias Kallman

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Apr 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM4/30/96
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Provided they never made their solo outings in 1970, I'd say

Isolation, and
Teddy boy

belonged there as well.

//Because. Matt


C.S.

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May 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/2/96
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RE: Beatles fantasy album ca 1971

A great concept. I'd include "Wah Wah" and other Harrisongs.
Certainly the song by Lennon, "Oh, My Love". And I always liked
"Junk", at least the tune. I think it would have to be a double
album.

Ezra Shilling

--
N/A

Brett Pasternack

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May 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/2/96
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Quoting daveinmn to All re: 1971 Beatles Albumda>From: dave...@aol.com
(DaveInMn)
da>Subject: 1971 Beatles Album

da>How about nominations for songs on a "fantasy" album "released" by the
da>Beatles in 1971? Here are a few songs for consideration:

da>Imagine
da>All Things Must Pass
da>Every Night
da>It Don't Come Easy
da>What is Life?
da>Maybe I'm Amazed
da>Jealous Guy

My feeling on this, when I'm inclined to let my imagination go, is that
you'd have to imagine that everything happened in 1970 as we know it, and
then they regrouped in early 1971. After all, the Beatles would never have
found room for even half of "All Things Must Pass" on a group project, and
most of the other 1970 albums (Plastic Ono Band, McCartney, Beaucoups of
Blues and Sentimental Journey) were unified albums which wouldn't fit into
Beatledom well.

So the Fabs get back together in early 1971, after Paul runs into Yoko at
an art gallery and they become friends. The existence of "It Don't Come
Easy" nicely saves them from a Paul-vs.-John battle over who does the first
single, with "Another Day" perhaps as the b-side. The 1971 Beatle album
would then include John's "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "It's So Hard", "Give
Me Some Truth", and "Oh My Love"; Paul's "Uncle Albert Admiral Halsey",
"The Back Seat Of My Car", "Heart Of The Country", "Eat At Home", "Oh Woman
Oh Why" and "Too Many People"; George's "Try Some Buy Some" and "Deep
Blue"; and something by Ringo, perhaps "Back Off Boogaloo" if it was
written in time. "Imagine" would have made a likely single from the album,
followed closely by the "Bangla Desh" benefit single.

And who can forget the release of the pivotal "Give Ireland Back To The
Irish"/"The Luck Of The Irish" single the following year. Some
historians have gone so far as to say that without that single, the deal to
unify Ireland in 1978, with the Protestants agreeing after Ireland agreed
to drop all Catholocism-based laws (prohibitions of divorce, contraception,
etc.) might never have happened...

One little-noticed event: in December, 1980, shortly after the release of
the double A-side single "Woman"/"Daytime Nighttime Suffering", a drifter
from Hawaii was arrested outside the Dakota in New York after he was found
to have an unlicensed handgun. John was not home at the time, being off
working on a new Beatles album. The drifter was soon checked into a mental
institution, where he was treated for schizophrenia; John lived to a ripe
old age.


* Wave Rider 1.20 [NR] *
... UNREGISTERED EVALUATION COPY

Rick Antonoff

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May 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/2/96
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>On 28 Apr 1996, DaveInMn wrote:
>> How about nominations for songs on a "fantasy" album "released" by the
>> Beatles in 1971? Here are a few songs for consideration:
>>
>> Imagine
>> All Things Must Pass
>> Every Night
>> It Don't Come Easy
>> What is Life?
>> Maybe I'm Amazed
>> Jealous Guy

>On Apr 30, 1996 19:42:13 in article <Re: 1971 Beatles Album>, 'Mattias

Kallman <e...@kuai.se>' wrote:
>Provided they never made their solo outings in 1970, I'd say
>
>Isolation, and
>Teddy boy
>
>belonged there as well.
>
> //Because. Matt
>

Actually, we did this thread in Dec/Jan and by the time two or three people
posted selections, we realized it should be a double album. There are
dozens of songs to choose besides those listed above: Give Me Some Truth,
Another Day, Apple Scruffs, Instant Karma, Uncle Albert, Photograph,
Working Class Hero, Oo You, My Sweet Lord (the whole group would've been
sued), and others.

--
Rick (ri...@pipeline.com)




Technicien(ne)s

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May 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/2/96
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Mattias Kallman wrote:
>
> On 28 Apr 1996, DaveInMn wrote:
> > How about nominations for songs on a "fantasy" album "released" by the
> > Beatles in 1971? Here are a few songs for consideration:
> >
> > Imagine
> > All Things Must Pass
> > Every Night
> > It Don't Come Easy
> > What is Life?
> > Maybe I'm Amazed
> > Jealous Guy
>
> Provided they never made their solo outings in 1970, I'd say
>
> Isolation, and
> Teddy boy
>
> belonged there as well.
>
> //Because. Matt

What about "My Sweet Lord"?
Maybe "Another Day" as well...

Robert.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Andrew Gladwin

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May 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/3/96
to agla...@solo.pipex.co.za

Assuming the normal rules (max 3 Harrisongs, 1 Ringo if available, rest approximately half John and Paul,
obviously exclude How Do You Sleep?, God etc. have a mixture of rockers and slowies etc. and assume George
was prepared to hold over some of his ATMP tracks, I would have a Christmas 1970 release as follows

1. Instant Karma!
2. Teddy Boy
3 My Sweet Lord
4 Junk
5. I Found Out
6. Apple Scruffs
7. Hold On, John
8. Mother
9. All Things Must Pass
10. Every Night
11. Isolation
12. That Would Be Something
13. Love
14. Maybe I'm Amazed

and a Christmas 1971 release like this

1. Imagine
2. What Is Life?
3. Monkberry Moon Delight
4. It Don't Come Easy
5. It's So Hard
6. Beware of Darkness
7. Back Seat of My Car
8. Jealous Guy
9. Dear Boy
10. Oh, My Love
11. Awaiting On You All
12. Another Day
13. Give Me Some Truth
14. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

I reckon these albums would be pretty much on a par with the rest of the fab's work..maybe not musically
groundbreaking as Revolver or Pepper, but extremely listenable, and thought-provoking at times.



***********************************************************************
*Andrew Gladwin- agla...@solo.pipex.co.za- Cape Town, South Africa *
*Smile- it may never happen *
***********************************************************************


Eric Adam Smith

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May 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/3/96
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Brett Pasternack (br...@cjbbs.com) wrote:
: So the Fabs get back together in early 1971, after Paul runs into Yoko at
: an art gallery and they become friends. The existence of "It Don't Come
: Easy" nicely saves them from a Paul-vs.-John battle over who does the first
: single, with "Another Day" perhaps as the b-side. The 1971 Beatle album
: would then include John's "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "It's So Hard", "Give
: Me Some Truth", and "Oh My Love"; Paul's "Uncle Albert Admiral Halsey",
: "The Back Seat Of My Car", "Heart Of The Country", "Eat At Home", "Oh Woman
: Oh Why" and "Too Many People"; George's "Try Some Buy Some" and "Deep
: Blue"; and something by Ringo, perhaps "Back Off Boogaloo" if it was
: written in time. "Imagine" would have made a likely single from the album,
: followed closely by the "Bangla Desh" benefit single.

: And who can forget the release of the pivotal "Give Ireland Back To The
: Irish"/"The Luck Of The Irish" single the following year. Some
: historians have gone so far as to say that without that single, the deal to
: unify Ireland in 1978, with the Protestants agreeing after Ireland agreed
: to drop all Catholocism-based laws (prohibitions of divorce, contraception,
: etc.) might never have happened...

: One little-noticed event: in December, 1980, shortly after the release of
: the double A-side single "Woman"/"Daytime Nighttime Suffering", a drifter
: from Hawaii was arrested outside the Dakota in New York after he was found
: to have an unlicensed handgun. John was not home at the time, being off
: working on a new Beatles album. The drifter was soon checked into a mental
: institution, where he was treated for schizophrenia; John lived to a ripe
: old age.

That's the kind of post that's almost too painful to read.

Oh, for what might have been...

--
Eric Adam Smith
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332
uucp: ...!{decvax,hplabs,ncar,purdue,rutgers}!gatech!prism!gt6699b
Internet: gt6...@prism.gatech.edu

Stephen Kennedy

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May 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/3/96
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Brett Pasternack wrote:
> So the Fabs get back together in early 1971, after Paul runs into Yoko at
> an art gallery and they become friends. The existence of "It Don't Come
> Easy" nicely saves them from a Paul-vs.-John battle over who does the first
> single, with "Another Day" perhaps as the b-side. The 1971 Beatle album
> would then include John's "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "It's So Hard", "Give
> Me Some Truth", and "Oh My Love"; Paul's "Uncle Albert Admiral Halsey",
> "The Back Seat Of My Car", "Heart Of The Country", "Eat At Home", "Oh Woman
> Oh Why" and "Too Many People"; George's "Try Some Buy Some" and "Deep
> Blue"; and something by Ringo, perhaps "Back Off Boogaloo" if it was
> written in time.

You're kidding aren't you?! You realistically think that Imagine can sit
alongside "Uncle Albert"? Don't misunderstand me, I have no problem with
"Uncle Albert" but I think it would cheapen John Lennon's most famous
song, and I can't imagine John standing for it either. If anything, your
"project" shows how far apart the solo Beatles were in the early 1970s,
even though they all were producing - at times - great material.

> And who can forget the release of the pivotal "Give Ireland Back To The
> Irish"/"The Luck Of The Irish" single the following year. Some
> historians have gone so far as to say that without that single, the deal to
> unify Ireland in 1978, with the Protestants agreeing after Ireland agreed
> to drop all Catholocism-based laws (prohibitions of divorce, contraception,
> etc.) might never have happened...
>
> One little-noticed event: in December, 1980, shortly after the release of
> the double A-side single "Woman"/"Daytime Nighttime Suffering", a drifter
> from Hawaii was arrested outside the Dakota in New York after he was found
> to have an unlicensed handgun. John was not home at the time, being off
> working on a new Beatles album. The drifter was soon checked into a mental
> institution, where he was treated for schizophrenia; John lived to a ripe
> old age.

Those two on the other hand are lovely ideas :-)

-Steve
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Just what is it that you want to do?"
"We want to be free... We want to be free to do what we want to do"

http://users.aol.com/g0lri/ http://users.aol.com/kkingboy/ G0LRI
----------------------------------------------------------------------


LGGsNmrl

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May 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/4/96
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In article <505_960...@cjbbs.com>, br...@cjbbs.com (Brett Pasternack)
writes:

>
>And who can forget the release of the pivotal "Give Ireland Back To The
>Irish"/"The Luck Of The Irish" single the following year. Some
>historians have gone so far as to say that without that single, the deal
to
>unify Ireland in 1978, with the Protestants agreeing after Ireland agreed

>to drop all Catholocism-based laws (prohibitions of divorce,
contraception,
>etc.) might never have happened...
>
>One little-noticed event: in December, 1980, shortly after the release of

>the double A-side single "Woman"/"Daytime Nighttime Suffering", a drifter

>from Hawaii was arrested outside the Dakota in New York after he was
found
>to have an unlicensed handgun. John was not home at the time, being off
>working on a new Beatles album. The drifter was soon checked into a
mental
>institution, where he was treated for schizophrenia; John lived to a ripe

>old age.

You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one.

Yours sincerely, wasting away,
Lisa (she's not a girl who misses much)

* * * * *
Find beauty in the banal, for it is everywhere. --Mark McKinney
* * * * *

ALAN OVIDIO LOPEZ

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May 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/4/96
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the best 1971 Beatle album would consist solely of John's "Plastic Ono Band".
(Does anyone else agree that "Plastic Ono Band" is as "punk" as John ever
got? Very minimalist arrangements. Very cool)

-al

Stephen Kennedy

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May 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/4/96
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I'd certainly agree that John's early-70s material was superb, although I
think George would deserve an honorary mention too. As for POB, it is indeed
raw (and raucous) but not really "punk", IMHO.

DaveInMn

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May 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/4/96
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I guess I am too old to know what "punk" is. Plastic Ono Band is very
good, albeit a bit sad overall. I would prefer a few "picker-uppers" on
the 1971 album, like Paul's "Every Night" or George's "What is Life?" in
addition to, say, Imagine and Isolation.

I don't think "God" would qualify for the 1971 fantasy Beatles LP, since
in it John is taking out the trash ("I don't believe in Beatles...I was
the walrus, but now I'm John... the dream is over." If the Beatles were
still together in 1971, as in the premise of this exercize, John would be
a little more upbeat.

I would nominate "Working Class Hero," which is a great song, but the
profanity disqualifies it (sorry, George Martin would have insisted on a
more commercially-viable lyric).

However, I think "My Mummy's Dead" would go great on the 1971 album, at
the end of one of the sides, something like "Maggie May" on Abbey Road.


JDrake6433

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May 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/4/96
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I think that John's "God" says it all. One of his best compositions, "God"
is a perfect song for 1971 (Imagine) because it tells of horrible
disillusionment that only the end of the Sixties, as personified in the
breakup of the greatest band and cultural influence of all time, could
bring. At the end of the Sixties, John does not believe in Jesus, Bob
Dylan, the Beatles, Krishna, etc. . . . . everything that at one time he
did believe in .

Brett Vargo

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May 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/5/96
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Plastic Ono Band is one of John's greatest accomplishments to be sure
(and don't forget Yoko's POB album--the two are great listened to side by
side...or alternating tracks!), but it certainly couldn't have been made
if the Beatles were still together. "I Found Out," "Hold On," and "God"
are three songs in particular that I don't think would have been recorded
if it hadn't been for a somewhat bitter breakup. However, how about this
for a 1971 Beatle album:

1. Mother
2. Every Night
3. Look At Me
4. What Is Life
5. Coochy Coochy
6. All Things Must Pass
7. Love

1. Art Of Dying
2. Maybe I'm Amazed
3. Well Well Well
4. The Back Seat Of My Car
5. Love
6. Isn't It A Pity


Danilka

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May 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/5/96
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Hmm, Admiral Halsey "Hands across the water" not included, although some
of the songs off of RAM are? You might not like it, but it was a #1 hit..
Anyway, RAM and McCartney are just NOT comparable to POB and Imagine.
Totally different styles. McCartney was writing rock, soft rock,
whatever, Lennon was writing pure melancholic pop. But when you combine
Milk and Honey/Double Fantasy Lennon's tracks with Tug Of War and some
Pipes of Peace tracks the result is fantastic. I wouldnt regret the
beatles reunited if they put out an album like the one I have on my tape.
In the early 80's McCartney and Lennon were as close in writing style as
in the early 60s... Its all bulshit of course. Lennon would have never
written GOD if he was still a Beatle ("I dont believe in Beatles")

Mattias Kallman

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May 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/6/96
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On 2 May 1996, Rick Antonoff wrote:
> >On 28 Apr 1996, DaveInMn wrote:
> >> How about nominations for songs on a "fantasy" album "released" by the
> >> Beatles in 1971? Here are a few songs for consideration:
> >> Imagine
> >> All Things Must Pass
> >> Every Night
> >> It Don't Come Easy
> >> What is Life?
> >> Maybe I'm Amazed
> >> Jealous Guy
> >On Apr 30, 1996 19:42:13 in article <Re: 1971 Beatles Album>, 'Mattias
> Kallman <e...@kuai.se>' wrote:
That was then this is now and nobody knows what tomorrow'll be...

> >Provided they never made their solo outings in 1970, I'd say
> >Isolation, and
> >Teddy boy
> >belonged there as well.
> > //Because. Matt
>

> Actually, we did this thread in Dec/Jan and by the time two or three people
> posted selections, we realized it should be a double album. There are
> dozens of songs to choose besides those listed above: Give Me Some Truth,
> Another Day, Apple Scruffs, Instant Karma, Uncle Albert, Photograph,
> Working Class Hero, Oo You, My Sweet Lord (the whole group would've been
> sued), and others.

Hmmm...I wasn't in yet by then. One point on these selections though -
considering the Beatle image, however decaying by 1969, I doubt that Paul
would have let John have neither Working Class Hero (shame, it's one of
the most brilliant songs of its genre) nor Gimme some truth on the
record.

At least, nobody suggested "How do you sleep". Now THAT would have made
some gossip...

//Because. Again. Matt.

ricka

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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On May 03, 1996 15:51:31 in article <Re: 1971 Beatles Album>, 'Stephen

Kennedy <st...@kalika.demon.co.uk>' wrote:


>>You're kidding aren't you?! You realistically think that Imagine can sit
>alongside "Uncle Albert"? >

This reminds of a comment I heard Lennon make while guest DJ-ing on WNEW-FM
in NYC. He played a personal tape of "I Am The Walrus" with much of the
production stripped away, even less than what's on Anth 2. It was a really
great sounding track, strong rhythm, John's vocal double tracked with no
effects, and when it ended there was complete silence on the air for a few
seconds and then John says: "Can you believe that song was the B side to
"Hello Goodbye"? It is remarkable how shallow Paul's songs are compared to
John's but they do, IMO, somehow stand side by side just fine. Paul's best
stuff around 1970-71 are good pop songs, I love'm, but they don't make you
stop, listen and think the way Working Class Hero, Imagine, Give Me Some
Truth, God do. I personally think Working Class Hero is even better than
anything Dylan's ever written and, believe me, Dylan blows me away with his
songs. Working Class Hero is simply the truth in a song, every word of it.

--
Rick (ri...@pipeline.com)





Josetxo Lakunza

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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jdrak...@aol.com (JDrake6433) wrote:

"God" from "Imagine"?? 1971???? NO
God was incluide in "Plastic Ono Band" L.P , in 1970.
Bye......


B. Pham

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May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
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ri...@nyc.pipeline.com(ricka) wrote:
>This reminds of a comment I heard Lennon make while guest DJ-ing on WNEW-FM
>in NYC. He played a personal tape of "I Am The Walrus" with much of the
>production stripped away, even less than what's on Anth 2. It was a really
>great sounding track, strong rhythm, John's vocal double tracked with no
>effects, and when it ended there was complete silence on the air for a few
>seconds and then John says: "Can you believe that song was the B side to
>"Hello Goodbye"? It is remarkable how shallow Paul's songs are compared to
>John's but they do, IMO, somehow stand side by side just fine. Paul's best
>stuff around 1970-71 are good pop songs, I love'm, but they don't make you
>stop, listen and think the way Working Class Hero, Imagine, Give Me Some
>Truth, God do. I personally think Working Class Hero is even better than
>anything Dylan's ever written and, believe me, Dylan blows me away with his
>songs. Working Class Hero is simply the truth in a song, every word of it.
>
>--
>Rick (ri...@pipeline.com)
>

Hey, perhaps "Hello, Goodbye" isn't really a shallow song. Perhaps Paul
was writing about his bewilderment on why his mind and another's didn't
mesh. "Why do you say goodbye?" Why are we so different? Why do you say
stop but I say go? Why can't we agree on something! Perhaps there is more
to this song than meets the ears. Maybe this is the kind of song that is
harder to "stop, listen and think" about because it seems so superficial at
first glance. We already think that the song is meaningless so we don't
try to look for any "deeper" meaning. Perhaps it's there waitng to be
discovered.

I'm not flaming you or anything and I don't necessarily think that "Hello,
Goodbye" has any real meaning. But perhaps it does.

b


mphillip

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May 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/11/96
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> jdrak...@aol.com (JDrake6433) wrote:
>
> John does not believe in Jesus.

Bet he changed his mind in 1980.


Frank Daniels

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May 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/11/96
to

Actually, following up on the claim that John didn't believe in
Jesus, John sort of believed everything. He did several interviews
where he talked about his beliefs. I don't think he strayed far
from his 1966 statements about modern religion ruining Christianity--
he believed that. But he accepted Jesus, as well as every superstition
and philosophy he could find. I think John was really searching for
some sort of enlightenment.

FD
--

____
/\ \ / / \ /|
/ \ \ / | | / |

Sanscluejo

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
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On May 10, 1996 05:34:34 in article <Hello, Goodbye has meaning? (was Re:

1971 Beatles Album)>, '"B. Pham" <bm...@u.washington.edu>' wrote:


>Hey, perhaps "Hello, Goodbye" isn't really a shallow song. Perhaps Paul
>was writing about his bewilderment on why his mind and another's didn't
>mesh. "Why do you say goodbye?" Why are we so different? Why do you
say
>stop but I say go? Why can't we agree on something! Perhaps there is
more
>to this song than meets the ears. Maybe this is the kind of song that is

>harder to "stop, listen and think" about because it seems so superficial
at
>first glance.

"B",
No, I think this song is shallow at every glance. It sounds as if
Paul used a book of antonyms to write it. You say yes, I say . . . hmmm .
. . how 'bout no. You say stop, I say . . . ahem . . . go, go, go. Face
it. Lyrically, this is a throwaway. What salvages it is the catchy,
melodic music. Good tune? Yes. Meaningful? No.
--

cluel...@usa.pipeline.com

5/11/96
--
sansc...@aol.com (also available in industrial strength as
cluel...@usa.pipeline.com)


cluelessjoe

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
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Mandarax

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
to

By common consent, unusual at that time, it was agreed that the Get
Back/Let It Be project was well past its sell-by date. The Beatles were
sick of it and nothing George Martin or Phil Spector could do would ever
make those tired old sessions sparkle in the way a Beatles record was
supposed to. It would be released only in a strictly limited edition as
a soundtrack accompanying the film; and the film would only released as
a one-hour television documentary.

Everyone was pulling in their own direction; and yet somehow they pulled
back from the brink. In spite of all the arrogance and egotism, a still
small voice spoke separately, in dreams, to John and Paul and George.
"Are you really good enough", it said to each in turn, "to write a whole
album of decent songs every year - a dozen or more songs, including one
or two worthy and memorable hit singles?

"That'll be far more than you have to do at the moment. Maybe you do
write so many songs a year, but let's face it, half of them are crap,
and their place is taken by the best songs that the others come up with.
That's why every album you've made to date, as the Beatles, is so
brilliant. Look how brilliantly everybody's songs balance each other on
Revolver, on Pepper, on Abbey Road."

And this actually made sense to the Beatles. Though they could not yet
quite think of themselves as the bosom buddies of former years, they
turned their attention to bringing together the best of what they had
worked on since the Abbey Road sessions. It didn't matter that Paul and
John wouldn't stay in the same studio, and wanted different producers:
they still appreciated that they still had good songs in them, which
sounded better together than apart.
Paul had recorded his basic tracks in Scotland for the solo album that
was now on hold, and now worked on them at Abbey Road with George
Martin: none of the other Beatles played on any of the tracks, but that
was hardly much different from "Yesterday" or "Blackbird". John, George
and Ringo preferred to work together, using Phil Spector to produce
their endeavours.

And the end result was an album that really did cling to the renewed
promise of Abbey Road, and was completely unlike the ragbag of Let It
Be. Released just in time for Christmas 1970 the album was called
Spectator, and its cover featured a pair of dark glasses of the sort
favoured by Phil Spector. McCartney had conceived the title, emphasising
his own isolation from the others, but John liked the word play
conveying Phil's role in the sessions, and took credit for the sleeve
design.

The track listing showed similar trends to the great Beatles albums,
Revolver and Abbey Road, again allowing George pride of place, a
responsibility which he more than lived up to. A Dylan song made its
first appearance on a Beatles album. The first side still exhibited all
of the Beatles' pop instincts, with side two more contemplative -
"gloomy" some critics said, though it still possessed great charm.

Altogether it was a gentle album, occasionally echoing other admired
contemporaries, such as Creedence or CSN. Combining, as ever, John's
introspection, George's philosophy, Paul's powerful melodies, and
Ringo's best song to date, it established that the Beatles were not a
spent force; and John Paul George and Ringo saw what everybody else had
known all along, that the group was far greater than the sum of its
parts.

You too can listen to Spectator. The track listing is as follows:

1.
What Is Life
Maybe I'm Amazed
Remember
Junk
If Not For You


It Don't Come Easy

Look At Me

2.
Two of Us
Isolation
Every Night
All Things Must Pass
Teddy Boy
Working Class Hero

Enjoy!

Marky J

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May 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/15/96
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Mattias Kallman <e...@kuai.se> wrote:

>Hmmm...I wasn't in yet by then. One point on these selections though -
>considering the Beatle image, however decaying by 1969, I doubt that Paul
>would have let John have neither Working Class Hero (shame, it's one of
>the most brilliant songs of its genre) nor Gimme some truth on the
>record.

Paul did let John get away with some fairly personal stuff on Beatles
records: The Ballad of John and Yoko for one :) so I don'tthink
Working Class Hero would necessarily have been ruled out.

I hope someone will correct me here, but I can't think of any Beatles
track off the top of my head that's as overtly political as "Gimme
Some Truth" but I think it would have made a great Beatles record and
I'd like to think that Paul wouldn't have vetoed it.

BTW, this is a great line of speculation to follow, but somewhat
painful too.

M

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marky J (Mark Jeffery) eni...@tassie.net.au

"The mandate theory of politics from the point of view of proper
analysis has always been absolutely phoney."
- John Winston Howard, 1987
------------------------------------------------------------------------


John Sinclair

unread,
May 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/16/96
to

On 5/9/96 04:57PM, in message <4msq43$f...@lince.lander.es>, Josetxo Lakunza
<jlak...@lander.es> wrote:

Maybe whoever wrote this got confused with the 1988 Imagine (The soundtrack for
the movie), in which "God" was included.

--
John Sinclair
--Jai Guru Deva--


ricka

unread,
May 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/24/96
to

>Mattias Kallman <e...@kuai.se> wrote:
>
>>Hmmm...I wasn't in yet by then. One point on these selections though -
>>considering the Beatle image, however decaying by 1969, I doubt that Paul

>>would have let John have neither Working Class Hero (shame, it's one of
>>the most brilliant songs of its genre) nor Gimme some truth on the
>>record.>>

In my humble speculation Paul would have had about as much of a chance to
veto WCH or GST as any of the other Beatles would have had to veto
"Yesterday". Geeze, Paul couldn't veto Revolution 9 from the White Album,
how's he gonna tell'm not to put WCH or GST on a Beatles record?!
--
Rick (ri...@pipeline.com)





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