What Octane Fuel for 00 Softail?

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BobsGL1500

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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I've only had my 00 Fatboy for 2 months and have been using 93 octane premium
fuel. I have a couple friends that have a Heritage Classic and a Softail
Standard and they have been using 87 octane regular fuel since they got them in
November. They say it runs fine with no pinging or knocking. All of our bikes
are stock, well for now anyway. I know that the fuel injected bikes come with a
decal that suggests using 91 or higher octane premium fuel. The 00 Softails
don't have such a decal.
What has everyone who has a 00 Softail or 99 model with the TC88 engine been
using? Just curious. Thanks

BC Wilson

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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run the high octane. in the long run, its better for it. amoco ultimate
(the clear gas) is best. the newer bikes don't neccesarily need it, but it
makes a difference in the long run. ~mule


BobsGL1500 <bobsg...@aol.com98> wrote in message
news:20000228170518...@ng-fo1.aol.com...

Mark McEvoy

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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I also have a 00 fatboy and have been running the higher octane. The manual
specifies to use at least 91 octane and I think in the long run the extra
buck or 2 will make a difference in performance and duration of the bike.

The dealer told me not to use a specific brand however and for the life of
me I can't remmeber which one. I'm almost thinking it was Sunoco high test
because of high amounts of methanol but don't quote me on that. You may want
to check that out. If anyone knows what gas I shouldnt be putting in please
remind me. Thanks.

Mark
00FLSTF

Michael Hewitt

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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BobsGL1500 wrote:
>
> I've only had my 00 Fatboy for 2 months and have been using 93 octane premium
> fuel. I have a couple friends that have a Heritage Classic and a Softail
> Standard and they have been using 87 octane regular fuel since they got them in
> November. They say it runs fine with no pinging or knocking. All of our bikes
> are stock, well for now anyway. I know that the fuel injected bikes come with a
> decal that suggests using 91 or higher octane premium fuel. The 00 Softails
> don't have such a decal.
> What has everyone who has a 00 Softail or 99 model with the TC88 engine been
> using? Just curious. Thanks

My owners manual said 91 octane so I've been using the highest grade available,
which is usually 93. The mid grade is 89 and I don't know if that is enough.
It would be nice to hear from someone who has used lower grades for awhile and
whether it has caused a problem.
--
-------
Grumpy - http://grumpysplace.net <----- We've moved!!
1987 XLH 1200 - The Wolf
2000 FLSTC - Babe
"Nobody loves me but my mother...and she could be jivin' too" - B.B. King

<*{{><

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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93 always. Valves and seats will last forever

--
Fish,
Red Knights
CapeCod chapter

Bill Pounds

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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Michael Hewitt wrote in message <38BB1347...@charter.net>...

I've used several tanks of 89 octane in my 00FLHTC with no noticable
differences or pinging. 91 octane is sometimes hard to find on the backroads
here in Iowa. I have 95" big bore with SE mikuni carb, JM20 cams, SE6200
ignition and Kerker slip-ons. Plugs read ok. I don't make a habit of the
lower grade gas but have been forced to go that way on 8 or 10 fill-ups.
And, name your poisen-money's on the bar.


Ronald O. Christian

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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On Mon, 28 Feb 2000 17:20:38 -0500, "BC Wilson"
<gte...@prism.gatech.edu> wrote:

>run the high octane. in the long run, its better for it. amoco ultimate
>(the clear gas) is best. the newer bikes don't neccesarily need it, but it
>makes a difference in the long run. ~mule

There was a thread along these lines in the sportster mailing list
awhile back. The general consensus was that you don't want to run
octane above that recommended for your particular motor for three
reasons:

1) Running too high an octane reduces power. (High octane gas
doesn't have any more energy, it just combusts later.)

2) Running too high an octane increases carbon buildup which
leads to pinging, detonation and possible engine damage.

3) If you're going to a higher octane fuel in order to solve a
pinging problem, you're not solving the right problem (usually a lean
condition) and you're actually exacerbating the problem in the long
run (see 2 above).

In summary, you're right, it makes a difference in the long run. Just
not the difference you had intended.

Ron
www.europa.com/~ronc
"CBS News could make a simple change and save themselves millions
of dollars. Turn Dan Rather's teleprompter around."
-- Oliver

hawgeye

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Feb 28, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/28/00
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Ronald O. Christian wrote...

> "BC Wilson" wrote:
>
> >run the high octane. in the long run, its better for it. amoco ultimate
> >(the clear gas) is best. the newer bikes don't neccesarily need it, but
it
> >makes a difference in the long run.
>

> There was a thread along these lines in the sportster mailing list
> awhile back. The general consensus was that you don't want to run
> octane above that recommended for your particular motor for three
> reasons:
>
> 1) Running too high an octane reduces power. (High octane gas
> doesn't have any more energy, it just combusts later.)
>
> 2) Running too high an octane increases carbon buildup which
> leads to pinging, detonation and possible engine damage.
>
> 3) If you're going to a higher octane fuel in order to solve a
> pinging problem, you're not solving the right problem (usually a lean
> condition) and you're actually exacerbating the problem in the long
> run (see 2 above).
>
> In summary, you're right, it makes a difference in the long run. Just
> not the difference you had intended.

Ron, not to doubt your word but I would be interested in seeing the study or
proof from which this is based on.

--
hawgeye AH96 BS98 CTNS
$tealer-dealer$ page: http://www.hawgeye.com/sd.htm
RMH FAQ: http://home.earthlink.net/~mildness/yo/frames/faqv2frm.html

Gary Cook

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Feb 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/29/00
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<snipped everything>
I used one tankful of less than 91 octane and it clattered like crazy under
load. I had to shift sooner, had less power. Usually used Texaco 93 Octane
but not my preference but just happened to be the station that was close to
me. I have ran Shell, 93 without a problem. I will try Ammoco.. (whatever
that was) if I find a station. I was very sorry to have put that "cheap" or
low octane gasoline in my scoot. I diluted it as soon as possible, with 93.
That was on my 99 FXD twin cam 88. I already had the SE Jet put in as the
engine tends to cough and sputter anyway. I sold that one two weeks ago with
8800 miles on it and await my 00 FXDWG. ~Gary~
PS: my brother is the distributor for Turbo Blue Racing Fuel and I have
pondered mixing a bit higher octane but don't think I will fiddle with my
expensive. I will await the knowlege to besiege us...

Ed Layne

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Feb 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/29/00
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I just asked the head technician at the dealership about this last week.
I have a 2000 fatboy and have been running Exxon high test since day 1
and he told me that Exxon or BP high test are the best selections. I
asked him about Amoco white gas because several people had recommended
it, and he said that Harley Davidson did not recommend running white gas
, but by all means, you need to always run high test whatever gas you
use. Hope this helps and good riding.

Lee Petersen

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Feb 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/29/00
to
hawgeye wrote:
>
> Ronald O. Christian wrote...
>
> > "BC Wilson" wrote:
> >
> > >run the high octane. in the long run, its better for it. amoco ultimate
> > >(the clear gas) is best. the newer bikes don't neccesarily need it, but
> it
> > >makes a difference in the long run.
> >
> > There was a thread along these lines in the sportster mailing list
> > awhile back. The general consensus was that you don't want to run
> > octane above that recommended for your particular motor for three
> > reasons:
> >
> > 1) Running too high an octane reduces power. (High octane gas
> > doesn't have any more energy, it just combusts later.)
> >
> > 2) Running too high an octane increases carbon buildup which
> > leads to pinging, detonation and possible engine damage.
> >
> > 3) If you're going to a higher octane fuel in order to solve a
> > pinging problem, you're not solving the right problem (usually a lean
> > condition) and you're actually exacerbating the problem in the long
> > run (see 2 above).
> >
> > In summary, you're right, it makes a difference in the long run. Just
> > not the difference you had intended.
>
> Ron, not to doubt your word but I would be interested in seeing the study or
> proof from which this is based on.


Terry, here is one place to start:

http://www.repairfaq.org/filipg/AUTO/F_Gasoline.html

Lee Petersen
#sixty

Lee Petersen

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Feb 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/29/00
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"<*{{><" wrote:
>
> 93 always. Valves and seats will last forever


Octane rating of your gas has absolutely nothing to do with valves,
seats, or their longevity.

Lee Petersen
#sixty

Mark McEvoy

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Mar 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/1/00
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Then why does the manual strongly suggest to use 91 Octane? They did build
the bike

Mark
Lee Petersen <brai...@flash.net> wrote in message
news:38BC586C...@flash.net...

Lee Petersen

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Mar 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/1/00
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Mark McEvoy wrote:
>
> Lee Petersen <brai...@flash.net> wrote in message
> news:38BC586C...@flash.net...
> > "<*{{><" wrote:
> > >
> > > 93 always. Valves and seats will last forever
> >
> >
> > Octane rating of your gas has absolutely nothing to do with valves,
> > seats, or their longevity.
> >
> > Lee Petersen
> > #sixty

> Then why does the manual strongly suggest to use 91 Octane? They did build
> the bike
>
> Mark


Because 91 octane is required for the compression and
ignition timing. All unleaded gas of any octane has the same
properties as far as the valves and seats are concerned, the
only thing the octane rating means is how fast the gasoline
will burn at a given compression ratio.

As far as I can tell, the guy with the goofball ascii doodad
for a name has somehow confused the octane rating system
which has not materially changed in fifty years, with the
alleged qualities of old fashioned leaded gas. Tetra-ethyl
Lead used to be added to gas as an octane booster. One of
the by-products of combustion was Lead metal, some of which
would plate out on the valve seats and/or valves. Since Lead
is a soft metal, it was assumed that the soft Lead acted as a
sort of cushion between the valves and seats that lessened
wear in the form of valve seat recession. Leaded gas has been
unavailable at the pump in the U.S. for almost twenty years
now, so even if you believe that the Tetra-ethyl Lead was good
for your valves, you are SOL now. But even back then, the
octane rating system was a measure of how fast the gas burned,
not a measure of how much Tetra-ethyl Lead was in the gas.

Lee Petersen
#sixty

Jordon

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Mar 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/2/00
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"Mark McEvoy" wrote in message

> Then why does the manual strongly suggest to use
> 91 Octane? They did build the bike

> Mark

McEvoy? Not too many of those around. Got a relative in the Seattle area
named Mike?

Jordon
BS2

PhatBoy

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Mar 5, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/5/00
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Here is my *humble* opinion <g> If you are running a stock Harley, by all
means follow the owners manuals suggestions. If you have knocking and have
followed the manufacturers recommendations, take it back to the dealership.
Obviously something is wrong. Have them fix it.
Octane is an additive that controls the burn of the fuel. As the RPMs go up,
the time interval that the engine has to burn the fuel shortens, so racers
use higher octane fuel so they can *time* the burn more precisely. The other
reason I don't like to use anything but regular, is that I don't know how
long the premium has been sitting there - as most people don't use it and it
could be stale. At least I know that the regular is as fresh as the last
tanker...
--
PhatBoy
'99 FLSTF
Burnout City USA

BobsGL1500 wrote in message
<20000228170518...@ng-fo1.aol.com>...

Preacher

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Mar 5, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/5/00
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BobsGL1500 wrote:

>I've only had my 00 Fatboy for 2 months and have been using 93 octane
premium
>fuel. I have a couple friends that have a Heritage Classic and a Softail
Standard

>and they have been using 87 octane regular fuel since they got hem in


>November. They say it runs fine with no pinging or knocking. All of our
bikes
>are stock, well for now anyway. I know that the fuel injected bikes come

ith a
>decal that suggests using 91 or higher octane premium fuel. The 00 Softails
>don't have such a decal.

Geez dude, look in yer owners manual. It's right there in print. I just
bought a '00 *carbureted* bike and the owners manual says 91 or better
octane. Just 'cause there ain't no "sticker" on the damn filler door don't
mean ya gotta go blank on us.


>What has everyone who has a 00 Softail or 99 model with the TC88 engine
>been using? Just curious. Thanks


I use *premium*, period. I'm in Central Calif. where I pay $1.92 a gallon
for premium (92 octane) compared to $1.71 a gallon for regular (87 octane).
That's 20 cents a gallon between the two. My bike holds 5 gallons of
gasoline. That's A BUCK difference per fill-up. One dollar.

If one dollar per fill-up makes that much of a difference to you then
*maybe* you ought'a re-think your decision to buy a $15-$19K motorcycle.

Not flaming you, just befuddled as hell why a dollar a tank would bother
someone.


Preacher - AH #89


PhatBoy

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Mar 6, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/6/00
to
Yes Sir you are right! Twin cam 88s do require at least a 91 octane fuel.
However My bike is Evo powered (see tag line below). I wanted the Evo
because there is 20 years of aftermarket parts for it and I like to
*tinker* on the beast...

--
PhatBoy
'99 FLSTF
Burnout City USA

Preacher wrote in message <89uo52$7f4$1...@slb7.atl.mindspring.net>...

Paul Bahre AKA Crash

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Oct 1, 2021, 9:56:01 AM10/1/21
to
you all must realize that when you pull up to a pump you are getting 1/3 to 1/2 a gallon of whatever crap they guy before you pumped into his car, gas can, tractor, motorcycle or whatever. So if you choose 91 gas you are probably getting diluted gas. In a small motorcycle gas tank like the 5 gallon FLSTF tank it makes a difference. So maybe getting 93 gas will net you 91 gas given the circumstances. I always look out for someone filling up a German car because all German cars call for high octane gas and I want to get in right behind them.

Bob La Londe

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Nov 4, 2021, 7:08:09 PM11/4/21
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Yeah, and make sure you use the right oil and the best spark plugs too.
That way you will know you are carrying the best gun in the
saddlebags, but they can't be Givi bags. Only genuine imitation OEM
aftermarket pleather from China. They have to be throw over so you can
look cool when you hang them over a shoulder to take your books to class.

--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Rick Begeman

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Jan 8, 2022, 11:55:58 AMJan 8
to
On 10/1/21 6:55 AM, Paul Bahre AKA Crash wrote:
> On Monday, March 6, 2000 at 3:00:00 AM UTC-5, PhatBoy wrote:
>> Yes Sir you are right! Twin cam 88s do require at least a 91 octane fuel.

I always look out for someone filling up a German car because all
German cars call for high octane gas and I want to get in right behind them.
>

Even if they had 100 octane fuel at the typical pump, everyone buys
regular! How long has that 100 octane sat in the tank sucking up water.

A lot of the premium fuel is stale because of this.

Now my real pet peeve with discussing octane.
When you are on the road you don't have a choice.
You take what is at the pump.

For all you tinkerers, I'll be gassing and going I'm not going stop to
to change my tune to match the percieved quality of fuel.

If it's hot and you are fully loaded going up hill, if your tuneup is
not right, your pistons will leave the motor via the tail pipe.

You should be talking about tuneup not fuel octane #'s posted on the
pump. You can change the tuneup but not the fuel quality.

--
Ironhead Rick

Phil Boutros

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Jan 11, 2022, 8:38:44 PMJan 11
to
Paul Bahre AKA Crash <ctro...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> you all must realize that when you pull up to a pump you are getting
> 1/3 to 1/2 a gallon of whatever crap they guy before you pumped into
> his car, gas can, tractor, motorcycle or whatever.
<snip>

First, you're replying to a thread so old, it can drink, even in
the US.

Secondly, one reason I like Chevron here in Canada, besides the
fact that they are the only ones to have 94 octane, which doesn't have
ethanol in it, is that they have a separate pump/nozzle just for the
94.

Of course, that doesn't help the staleness problem, but I had fuel
work just fine that was in my tank for multiple yearS, as long as I
remembered to add some fuel conditioner every year.


Phil
--
AH#61 Wolf#14 BS#89 bus#1 CCB#1 SENS KOTC#4
ph...@philb.ca http://philb.ca

Snag

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Jan 12, 2022, 6:28:07 PMJan 12
to
I trade at a station that has a dedicated 92 non-ethanol pump . The
gas there is never stale between the local hot rodders and all the bikes
that come here for the roads .
--
Snag
Let's Go Brandon !

Rick Begeman

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Jan 21, 2022, 3:38:48 PMJan 21
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Yep, lucky to find a good station anymore.
The bastards here double the price of premium for non-ethanol gas.

--
Ironhead Rick
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