Q: boxing's "overhand" punch

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Greg McNairney

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Mar 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/16/00
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I was checking out the "Digital Dojang", specifically FB's articles on
boxing.
He talks about practicing the rear and lead overhand punch. I don't
know
what it is. Can someone explain it?

TIA...Greg


Khun Kao

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Mar 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/16/00
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The overhand punch is "similar" to a cross. Basically, you throw a
punch as though you are throwing a baseball. The reason I say it's
similar to a cross is that you don't want to exaggerate the punch, but
disguise it to look like a cross.

--
Khun Kao Charuad
SuriyaSak Muay Thai at USDC
www.elbowko.com
www.lloydirvin.com


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Frank Benn (aka FB)

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Mar 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/16/00
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Greg McNairney wrote:

Hello Greg.

The overhand is basically a descending cross. However, it also has an
arccing follow-through and return like a hook, except that the arc is more
vertical, unlike the hook.

It has the same essential body mechanics as the cross -- rear heel turns
out, other hand up with elbow in, chin down, shifting weight to the
forward foot, etc. -- and there are alternate positions of the head.

The overhand punch -- when properly thrown -- is a solid weapon for
certain tasks. It's all a matter of using it when it's the thing to use.
If a straight-on shot will hit an obstacle, for instance, sometimes you
need to drop in over the obstacle (e.g. over the shoulder, or over his
hands) to do your damage. The overhand is one of those weapons which does
the trick.

When done correctly, the overhand is a disciplined, tight, hard-hitting,
and quick punch. At the other extreme, some people throw overhands like
they're dropping bombs -- hence the term in boxing, when someone throws
over-reaching overhands.

One important factor in throwing the punch is that the range and direction
of the opponent's movement is what validates the punch. Every punch in
boxing is this way. Making a punch land against a moving target is a game
of dual trajectories and timing that you can only learn by doing.

The overhand is a rear hand punch only. That is, you can't overhand with
the lead hand unless (1) that hand is in a momentary "rear" position and
(2) the situation calls for it. These are some of your alternate,
specialized angles (i.e. in this case a #7, when he is to the side).

An example of using the overhand with the lead hand would be when the
opponent bobs hard forward to my rear hand side and keeps going past or
steps out to that side and is about to turn. At this point, he is
*beside* me at a medium distance instead of in front of me, and my lead
hand is now my "rear" hand, so to speak, until I adjust my stance and
facing direction. If he is at the right distance, I'll cover and launch
the lead toward his chin like a cross, and if his chin is down and
shoulder is up on that side I'll throw it as an overhand and bounce it off
his temple.

Good luck with your overhand.


Frank Benn (aka FB)

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Mar 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/16/00
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Khun Kao wrote:

> The overhand punch is "similar" to a cross. Basically, you throw a
> punch as though you are throwing a baseball.

Actually, it is not like throwing a baseball, in some very important ways.

The forearm is aligned in the direction of the punch. The elbow trails
the fist, rather than flailing in front of it and whipping the fist in a
fast arc, which is what happens when throwing a baseball.


Khun Kao

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Mar 17, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/17/00
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You're right. I chose a bad example for this. I was trying to
illustrate the arc of the punch and neglected to account for the actual
position of the arm/hand. My bad.

But that does go back to what I was saying about it being similar to a
cross. When I use the overhand punch, I throw it more like a cross
with the elbow up. Or something like that. Hell, I don't often use
it, practice it, or teach it. I should probably give it more attention
than that...

Muay Thai boxer

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Mar 17, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/17/00
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It's also referred to as the cutting punch. Just in case you come across that
;)

-Nak Muay

Greg McNairney

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Mar 17, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/17/00
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...thanks to all for the replies!


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