Anthony and little tricks

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Scott Seltzer

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Jul 20, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/20/95
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Does Anthony Gatto do any tricks with less than 4 clubs, 5 rings, or 5
balls? Does that boy know anything interesting with 3 balls? Or even contact
juggling? Or does he only do the big tricks?

All I hear about him are things like 8 clubs, 12 rings, and numerous tricks
with the likes of 5 clubs and 8 rings, etc. Does he do a unique routine with
three balls or clubs? Does he delve into Diablo or Devil Stick or Cigar Boxes?

Just thought this would be a different twist on Anthony.

Scott o o
o

\0/
X
/ \


Andrew John Conway

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Jul 21, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/21/95
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In article <1995072019...@mserv.superstudio.co.il>,
sco...@superstudio.co.il (Scott Seltzer) wrote:

:Does Anthony Gatto do any tricks with less than 4 clubs, 5 rings, or 5


:balls? Does that boy know anything interesting with 3 balls?

: [snip]

Barry Bakalor once asked Nick Gatto this question. Nick said, "Anthony, do
your three ball trick." Anthony proceed to juggle three balls in his right
hand with continuous behind the back throws. So far as I know this is the
only three ball trick he does. However, he does do all the standard three
club tricks, and is excellent at kick ups.

Andrew con...@bdt.com
I have a home page - http://www.bdt.com/home/conway/

ben.d...@vousbbs.com

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Jul 22, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/22/95
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> Does Anthony Gatto do any tricks with less than 4 clubs, 5 rings, or

> 5 balls? Does that boy know anything interesting with 3 balls? Or even

> contact juggling? Or does he only do the big tricks?

Last time I saw Anthony, he did the croquet ball off the head gag where one
drops the heavy balls on the stage, but then bounces a rubber one off the head
at the same time the heavy ones are clanked together with the hands. It's an
oldy, but a moldy, and it got a good laugh. Kind of strange to see the best
juggler in the world doing a standard comedy gag...

-Ben Decker
-Editor, "Two Ply Press"
-The ONLY juggling monthly sent right to your door...


Alan Morgan

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Jul 24, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/24/95
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In article <1995072019...@mserv.superstudio.co.il>,

Scott Seltzer <sco...@superstudio.co.il> wrote:
>Does Anthony Gatto do any tricks with less than 4 clubs,

He has a fairly impressive 3 club routine which involves lots of
very fast half-pirouettes and kick-ups. Of course, he can't resist
adding a ball to this after about 2 minutes and doing head bounces
and several four club tricks with 3 clubs and a ball. When I saw him
perform a few days ago he had even moved up to 4 clubs and a ball and
was doing some *wierd* combination tricks.

The only three ball "trick" he does is the mundo-lame three cannon ball
joke which has been done by every juggler since the year cannon balls
were invented.

Alan

Doug Harris

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Jul 25, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/25/95
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>The only three ball "trick" he does is the mundo-lame three cannon ball
>joke which has been done by every juggler since the year cannon balls
>were invented.

At some point since I returned from Vegas I was describing this trick and I
knew that I had seen somebody do it in Vegas and I could vaguely picture a
juggler on a real stage (i.e. not Renegade), but I just didn't think it was
in Anthony's show that I had seen it... not Anthony, he's above that, right?

Sadly, Alan has reminded me that it was indeed Anthony who did this.

doug


JKalvan

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Jul 26, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/26/95
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I remember seeing Anthony at the San Jose convention in '86 walking around
in the gym with one of those little plastic diabolos (the ones with the
ratchet), also he was riding (shakily) around the gym on a giraffe
unicycle.

I hear he still works on these props - before his shows, backstage, he
warms up with Fritz Grobe's diabolo routine and Jay Gilligan's unicycle
routine.

Jack.

PS. I also remember playing hide-and-seek with him, Dana Tison, and Mark
and Scott Bakalor, etc.
(and he was INCREDIBLE at it. :-) )

STEVE 'DOC' SALBERG

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Jul 26, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/26/95
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From: sco...@superstudio.co.il (Scott Seltzer)

>Does Anthony Gatto do any tricks with less than 4 clubs, 5 rings, or 5
>balls? Does that boy know anything interesting with 3 balls? Or even contact
>juggling? Or does he only do the big tricks?
>

>All I hear about him are things like 8 clubs, 12 rings, and numerous tricks
>with the likes of 5 clubs and 8 rings, etc. Does he do a unique routine with
>three balls or clubs? Does he delve into Diablo or Devil Stick or Cigar Boxes?

When Anthony takes up the Diabolo, I'll melt mine down into paper weights!

Steve S.
.sig sneaking quietly towards my prop bag with a book of matches...


Godot7

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Jul 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/27/95
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"Last time I saw Anthony, he did the croquet ball off the head gag where
one
drops the heavy balls on the stage, but then bounces a rubber one off the
head
at the same time the heavy ones are clanked together with the hands. It's
an
oldy, but a moldy, and it got a good laugh. Kind of strange to see the
best
juggler in the world doing a standard comedy gag..."

Somebody, at one time, albiet a long time ago, wrote that gag. It was
pretty funny. A whole bunch of his contemporarys stole it. Now it an
"oldy, moldy". Keep that in mind.

Michael Goudeau

Andrew John Conway

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Jul 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/27/95
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In article <3v8pb7$7...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>,
god...@aol.com (Godot7) wrote:

[On the cannon ball gag]
:Somebody, at one time, albiet a long time ago, wrote that gag. It was


:pretty funny. A whole bunch of his contemporarys stole it. Now it an
:"oldy, moldy". Keep that in mind.

Good point. I was very disappointed to see a kid on the Renegade stage in
Vegas perform the 'juggling on a motorcycle' gag. The only people who have
a right to that joke are the guy who wrote it (whose name I forget) and
Michael Davis, who bought it from him. I was one of several people who were
shouting "Joke Police!" when we saw this. I hope someone took the kid aside
afterwards, and explained to him that performing somebody else's jokes is
not cool.

Benjamin Young

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Jul 28, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/28/95
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In article <AC3D79ED9...@conway.dial-up.bdt.com>,
Andrew John Conway <con...@bdt.com> wrote:
[On the juggling-on-a-motorcycle gag]

> The only people who have a right to that joke are the guy who wrote it
> (whose name I forget) and Michael Davis, who bought it from him.

A) You can /buy/ jokes from people? Is this related to cheap jokes?
B) Is one of the above people the juggler on that Smothers Brothers
episode? Should I not have been laughing?

-Ben Y

.sig's thinks jokes should be shareware--if you still laugh after the first
few times, you are obliged to send the author money. Or maybe the lead-
up lines are free and only the registered users are sent the punchlines.


Barry Bakalor

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Jul 28, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/28/95
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In article <DCEv8...@midway.uchicago.edu>, Benjamin Young

<bc...@midway.uchicago.edu> wrote:
>In article <AC3D79ED9...@conway.dial-up.bdt.com>,
> Andrew John Conway <con...@bdt.com> wrote:
>[On the juggling-on-a-motorcycle gag]
>> The only people who have a right to that joke are the guy who wrote it
>> (whose name I forget) and Michael Davis, who bought it from him.

The originator of the gag was Jim Hershey, a San Diego magician and
street performer. Ben Decker posted the story to rec.juggling in
January 1993:

WWW:
http://www.hal.com/hal-bin/news2html/93/01/23-013139

FTP:
ftp.hal.com:/pub/juggle/rj/93/01/23-013139

E-mail:
To: jug...@hal.com
Subject: NEWS-SERVICE

SEND ben.72...@crash.cts.com

>A) You can /buy/ jokes from people? Is this related to cheap jokes?

About 1985, Michael Davis watched Hershey's show in Balboa Park, and
liked the juggling-on-a-motorcycle kazoo gag. He stayed after the
show, gave Jim a nice tip, and asked if he could use that joke in his
act. Michael gave Jim $100 for the use of the joke, and agreed that
Jim could continue to use it as well. This should be the model for
adapting someone elses material in one's act, and is a lot classier
than simply stealing the joke, as many others might do. A few weeks
later, Davis used the joke in a Tonight Show appearance, and continued
to use it after that.

>B) Is one of the above people the juggler on that Smothers Brothers
> episode? Should I not have been laughing?

I am pretty certain it was Michael Davis you saw doing this joke on the
Smothers Brothers show. So it's OK, you can laugh.

>.sig's thinks jokes should be shareware--if you still laugh after the first
> few times, you are obliged to send the author money.

Uh-oh. I think a lot of us owe Ngaio a bundle.

barry

Juggling Information Service
http://www.hal.com/services/juggle/ ftp.hal.com:/pub/juggle
E-mail: jug...@hal.com, FILE-SERVICE in Subject, HELP in body
--
Barry Bakalor HaL Computer Systems <home>
ba...@hal.com 1315 Dell Avenue 1722 Cheney Drive
Mgr., Web Technology Campbell, CA 95008 San Jose, CA 95128
www.hal.com/~barry/ 408-379-7000x1491 408-293-7279

Alan Morgan

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Jul 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/30/95
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In article <3v6utk$1...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, JKalvan <jka...@aol.com> wrote:
>I remember seeing Anthony at the San Jose convention in '86 walking around
>in the gym with one of those little plastic diabolos (the ones with the
>ratchet), also he was riding (shakily) around the gym on a giraffe
>unicycle.
>
>I hear he still works on these props - before his shows, backstage, he
>warms up with Fritz Grobe's diabolo routine and Jay Gilligan's unicycle
>routine.

Close, but not quite. Actually he does Fritz's unicycle routine and
Jay's diabolo routine. Boppo also taught Anthony a bunch of his favorite
combination tricks and Anthony works on those too.

Alan
----
.sig warming up with Anthony's three ball routine

ben.d...@vousbbs.com

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Jul 31, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/31/95
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> jokes?
>
> About 1985, Michael Davis watched Hershey's show in Balboa Park, and
> liked the juggling-on-a-motorcycle kazoo gag. He stayed after the
> show, gave Jim a nice tip, and asked if he could use that joke in
> his
> act. Michael gave Jim $100 for the use of the joke, and agreed that
> Jim could continue to use it as well. This should be the model for
> adapting someone elses material in one's act, and is a lot classier
> than simply stealing the joke, as many others might do. A few weeks
> later, Davis used the joke in a Tonight Show appearance, and
> continued
> to use it after that.
>
> >B) Is one of the above people the juggler on that Smothers Brothers
> > episode? Should I not have been laughing?
>
> I am pretty certain it was Michael Davis you saw doing this joke on
> the
> Smothers Brothers show. So it's OK, you can laugh.

Yep... that's pretty much how it went. The interesting thing is that Mike Davis
kept talking about that joke all the way back to the car and it was with
prodding from me and Greg Dean that he went back to buy the joke. He did it
shortly thereafter on national TV. Hershey used to keep a Xerox of the check in
his wallet to prove that he sold it :)

The joke was originally written during one of our many (many!) practice
sessions in the Federal Building Gymnasium in San Diego while sitting and
gabbinb and playing with a kazoo.

It's funny... I've had jokes stolen from me on ocassion and I've seen so many
jokes used without permission. I don't like it. No one who writes does. But
this is one of those rare jokes where the hairs on the back of my neck really
stand up and I get this amazing emotional response when I see other people do
it... ESPECIALLY at a jugglers fest. It's the best joke Jim ever wrote and he
was ECSTATIC to have someone he admired so much offer him a lot of money for
it...


-Ben

ejb...@teleport.com

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Aug 1, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/1/95
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Alan Morgan <al...@efi.com> wrote:
>JKalvan <jka...@aol.com> wrote:

>>I hear he still works on these props - before his shows, backstage, he
>>warms up with Fritz Grobe's diabolo routine and Jay Gilligan's unicycle
>>routine.

>Close, but not quite. Actually he does Fritz's unicycle routine and
>Jay's diabolo routine. Boppo also taught Anthony a bunch of his favorite
>combination tricks and Anthony works on those too.

And of course, contact juggling. Anthony is a cj maniac, but recognizes
that all possible moves have been done (or creatively visualized, or
emotionally co-opted, or at least behaviorally imprinted) by Mickey
M., and so leaves them out of the act.

=Eric the Curmudgeon

Andrew John Conway

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Aug 16, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/16/95
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In article <950804$135940$7292p...@ozemail.com.au>,
Peter Milway <pmi...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:

:Now I feel guilty and I want to appologise for my use of
:"juggling on a motorcycle", at various times and locations.
:
: [snip]
:
:In comparison, how do you acknowledge the person who first did
:a double spin with a club? I know that this is an extreme comparison,
:but someone must have done it first, and now it is an acceptable thing
:to do by every juggler. So at sometime it moved from the private to
:the public domain.
:
: [snip]

There is a big difference between a joke like the motorcycle gag (which is
hard to think up and easy to learn) and a trick like double spins (which is
easy to think up and hard to learn). There are some grey ares in the middle
(trademark tricks, contact juggling and so on) but basically, if something
took a lot of effort to think up, you should not assume that it is ok to
copy. If something is an obvious extension of existing technniques, then
the first person to perform it has no real claim to ownership.

Jonathan M Poppele

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Aug 17, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/17/95
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Andrew John Conway wrote:
>In article <950804$135940$7292p...@ozemail.com.au>,

>hard to think up and easy to learn) and a trick like double spins (which is
>easy to think up and hard to learn). There are some grey ares in the middle
>(trademark tricks, contact juggling and so on) but basically, if something
>took a lot of effort to think up, you should not assume that it is ok to
>copy. If something is an obvious extension of existing technniques, then
>the first person to perform it has no real claim to ownership.
>

Well, what about something which is an obvious extension of an existing
JOKE or ROUTINE? I mean, how different is Menendez' piano from some of the
bouncing on musical instuments the FKBs do? How much of a leap is it from
bouncing balls on an electric drum? It is a step, but it didn't come from
nowhere. Should Menendez ask all of the drum bouncers if it's OK for him to
use the idea? I don't know where Dan got the idea for the piano. I'm sure
he came up with it on his own. I'm equally sure that things like the
drum bouncers before him, and posibly the FKB music routines also influenced
him. We can't talk about these routines as if they came out of nowhere. It's
a bit like Mike Mochen bitching about everyone who rolls a ball across their
body. "yea, like that jerk Brunn, whats with that contact stuff he does."

While I think that it is very important to keep a safe distance from other
peoples routines and performances, we have to acknowledge that we inspire
eachother, both with our tricks, and with our jokes and routines. It is also
a falacy to talk about things like "the guy who invented doubles" or even
"the guy who wrote the eat the apple gag." These tricks and routines
were not "invented" by one person. They were probobly re-invented a hundred
times and evolved through the use by countless jugglers. Taking another
performers idea one step further is one way in which we advance the art.

Another issue. What about tricks/routines/jokes which are independantly
invented? Should my partner and I NOT juggle three lawnchairs between us
(a trick we had the idea for in 1986, three years before we learned to
juggle anything but 3 balls) because I saw the Airborn Comedians do it
in Burlington in 1994 (yea, 8 years after we had the idea)? Or should we
just sue them? (joke) Or what about doing a routine while playing a game of
questions (from the play Rosencrants and Gildenstern Are Dead)? Sure the
FKB's do it, but I only found that out two months ago and my partner and I
discussed the idea for the routine 4 years ago (it's his favorate play and
we used to warm up our voices/improv skills for shows by playing questions
in the car). Somehow, in neither of these cases would I feel that we had
stolen anything from other performers. None the less, the ideas are pretty
darn similar.

Anyways, enough ramblings. I'm just trying to point out that these issues
are about as far from cut and dried as you can get.

Cheers

Jon.


Godot7

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Aug 18, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/18/95
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"Another issue. What about tricks/routines/jokes which are independantly
invented? Should my partner and I NOT juggle three lawnchairs between us
(a trick we had the idea for in 1986, three years before we learned to
juggle anything but 3 balls) because I saw the Airborn Comedians do it
in Burlington in 1994 (yea, 8 years after we had the idea)? Or should we
just sue them? (joke) Or what about doing a routine while playing a game
of
questions (from the play Rosencrants and Gildenstern Are Dead)? Sure the
FKB's do it, but I only found that out two months ago and my partner and I

discussed the idea for the routine 4 years ago (it's his favorate play and
we used to warm up our voices/improv skills for shows by playing
questions"

My advice is quit talking and start working.

The possibility of proving that you thought of a routine before someone
else did it does bring up a great set of lawyer options. You could sue
someone for something you planned to do. But they might counter sue you
first. I don't know. Oh, and as far as juggling off a drum...I know that
the vast majority of us saw that on a Bobby May film that predates the
Karamazov Brothers. And I'm not even sure that Checkov was consulted on
that name thing.

I still believe the big issue is mental work as opposed to physical. If a
monkey could do it with stuff he found in the jungle, it is probably OK
for you to copy it. If it took a human, leave it alone. Even if it only
required the human to drive to "Target" to get the prop.

Michael Goudeau

Bill Brandon

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Aug 19, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/19/95
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There is a simple answer: Amateurs plagarize. Professionals steal.

(and of course that answer is stolen, too)

sig wonders how he'll like it when the Joke Po-lice kick in the
door

--
Bill Brandon
Accomplishment Technology Unlimited
Mesquite, Texas, USA
7670...@compuserve.com

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