Beagle, trying to train her to hunt rabbits.

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Donald W. Bristol

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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Jason wrote:
>
> Yes, i have a 2 year old full blooded red tick beagle, and when i try to
> get her to hunt rabbits, she really doesnt smell around, she just really
> trys to play with the other dogs, while the other dogs are trying to hunt.
>
> If you would please, send me the best way, to get her to hunt rabbits..
> Please
>
> jjus...@centuryinter.net
>
> Thank you for your time..
>
> Jason

Jason,
Keep taking her out, alone if possible. At two yrs of age, she still
isn't a mature dog, and will want to run off some of the puppy energy.
That's normal.

As far as getting her interested in rabbits. If she has no other dogs to
"play" with on your hunt, she should start letting her nose lead her.
Sooner or later, she'll jump a bunny and get the idea they're fun to
chase. Don't be to eager to kill one on her first runs, unless they're
well ahead of her. When you do, let her find it first, a reward for the
chase.

Good Luck.

Jason

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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Steve Raglin

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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Jason
I have used the old way of putting the new dog with a dog that can run already.
This can take a while, but is successful most of the time. Another way is to
have a pen, as big as you can, and put a few rabbits in it. A rabbit that has
been cross bred from a wild rabbit and a tame rabbit works well. Let the pen
grow up, and put a few old Christmas trees in it to give the rabbits cover.
After they have been in there long enough to find hiding spots, put a beagle
pup in pen and watch the show. You need to be careful not to run the beagle or
the rabbits too long. A few weeks of this will usually get the dog off to a
good start. Try to run them in a field right after you have pulled him from
the pen. They will usually be excited.
Steve

MCDVM

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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@ 2 yrs, she should be trailing rabbits proficiently!! Best to locate a
Beagle club (call Hounds & Hunting @ 814-368-6154 for the club nearest
you.) These clubs have fenced running grounds that abound in rabbits for
easy training. Of course, if she isn't bred to hunt, she may never.
Good Luck.

Al Evans

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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Hello,

I'm looking for some FIRST HAND comments on Weimaranars for pheasant
and duck hunting, as well as a family pet. In general so far I have
heard negitive things from people who have never owned one, and positive
things from those who have.

Jim

Walter Tondu

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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My 1.5 yr old. weim had his first duck season last year and he
was fantastic. I used him as a retriever up until the water
started to freeze over and he did very well, not losing any
birds and makeing each and every double (even though there
weren't that many doubles because my gun barrel was bent :).

I'll be going up to South Dakota this year for pheasant and
he's been getting quite a bit of training over the last month
in preparation. I'm sure he'll do well.

As far as having a weim for a family pet, I wouldn't have
any other breed.

I can give you some negatives; chewing stuff mostly.

Be prepared to give them a very considerable portion of your
time as they will not ask for it but rather demand it of you.
You might wonder who is training whom after a while.

Al Evans (evans....@MAYO.EDU) wrote:
: Hello,

: Jim

--
..........................................................................
Walter Tondu wto...@tondu.com
Tondu & Associates, Inc. http://www.tondu.com (under construction)
N758ND R172K '80 Hawk XP II It's good to be the King.
..........................................................................

Mark Beaven

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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Al Evans wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I'm looking for some FIRST HAND comments on Weimaranars for pheasant
> and duck hunting, as well as a family pet. In general so far I have
> heard negitive things from people who have never owned one, and positive
> things from those who have.
>
> Jim

Jim,

Take it from someone who has Weimaraners, THEY ARE GREAT!!!

I've had Weims for over 15 years and have hunted ducks, pheasant,
grouse, and quail. I also compete in field trials throughout the US and
Canada and would not think twice about putting my wiems down against any
other breed. In my opinion they are one of the best all round hunting
dog/family friend.

One thing that I must warn you on though, like most other breeds we have
our unscrupulous breeders. There are a lot of show breeders out there
that will sell you a dog saying it will make a good hunting dog but in
actual fact they are not. If you are looking at getting a Weimy PLEASE
do the homework. Ask to see the sire and damn work birds. Ask for a
list of puppy owners that the breeder has sold puppys to in the past.
Ask if they compete in field trials or hunting tests. When I get
people interested in our line I encourage them to come out and spend the
day with me and my Weims out hunting or training. Also, ask about
guarentees.....we guarentee that any pup you buy from our breeding will
be one of the best (if not THE GREATEST) hunting dogs you will ever
own. In fifteen years I have not had to take one back.(Although I would
of liked to take a few of them back because they beat my own dogs in the
field trials)

Anyway, I'll get down off my soap box and wish you good luck!

Yours in conservation,

Mark Beaven

Northern Light Farms
Richmark Weimaraners

Barry Smith

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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Al Evans wrote:
> I'm looking for some FIRST HAND comments on Weimaranars for pheasant
> and duck hunting, as well as a family pet. In general so far I have
> heard negitive things from people who have never owned one, and positive
> things from those who have


Pretty much to be expected, don't you think? Everytime someone on this
group asks for an opinion about a breed, owners of the breed love it and
wouldn't have anything else.

I have 2 Weims, currently 4 and 5 years old. They're very nice dogs,
but they do tend to be a handful. We like having them as pets, but
they are fairly high maintenance in that they need a lot of attention.
If you can give your pet lots of time and energy, they'll repay you in
kind.

My Weims are pretty good hunters, but they were both slow to mature.
They settled down a lot between 2 and 3 years old, and as they did so,
they became more tractible as hunting dogs. Ours have always been
birdy, so the problem was steadying them up. The older one has turned
into a very nice woodcock dog. The younger one is pretty good on
pheasant. The older one did better last year on pheasant than he did
the previous year. They both tend to crowd grouse, but I believe
they're learning.

As with every breed, there are good ones and bad ones, with most of them
somewhere in the middle. Anyone who says all Weimaraners are bad simply
doesn't know the breed. Anyone who says they're all good is equally as
ignorant. You can increase your odds by buying from a reputable
breeder, but you should not simply take anyone's advice, but should do
your homework and ask lots of tough questions. In the end, it might
just come down to some luck on your part. The same can be said about
any breed.

Good luck.

Barry Smith

hart...@aol.com

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Mar 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/27/97
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Weimaranars have got a bad reputation in the circles I go in. It is mainly as a
result of their unpredictable and sometimes agressive nature. Unfortunately
some I have met seem to snap at younger kids. Mind you, most of these are show
bred, I would expect a better temperment in a working bred dog?

Paul

Mark Beaven

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Mar 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/27/97
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Paul,

It's unfortunate to hear that you have had some bad experience with
Weim's temperment. I on the other hand have never had one that I would
consider aggressive. Actually, quite the opposite. I have seen weims
being aggressive towards each other but I believe that is strictly a
dominance thing and not aggression.

Yours in conservation,

Mark

Steven Kreuser

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Mar 31, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/31/97
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Paul, I would go to a hunt test or a field trial and watch other "weims"
from that line. Usually you can pick up quite a bit on a dog. Watch them as
they walk to the line, as far as interaction with other dogs, and follow the
brace. Watch the dog when they are released to see if they start after the
other dog and listen for any commands the handler might give the dog. If
you want a duck and pheasent or fur dog, I suggest you look at the GWP.
GWP's have the protection for weather in duck hunting and are known as
"Jeep's" when it comes to upland birds. Jeep's can go through anything!

Alan Robertson

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Apr 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/1/97
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On Thu, 27 Mar 1997 hart...@AOL.COM wrote:

> Weimaranars have got a bad reputation in the circles I go in. It is mainly as
a
> result of their unpredictable and sometimes agressive nature. Unfortunately
> some I have met seem to snap at younger kids. Mind you, most of these are
show
> bred, I would expect a better temperment in a working bred dog?
>
> Paul
>
>
Paul,

I too am sorry to hear you have had bad experiences with Weimaraners. You
must be very unlucky because I show and do obedience, very successfully I
might add with my Wei and you couldn't ask for a better natured dog
whether it be with adults or children and all the other Wei's I know
around the show ring are the same.

Yes, they can be aggresive towards other dogs, although mine isn't unless
provoked but that I think is common in most breeds of dog.

I would still say to any "would be" Wei owners out there that as a rule
Weimaraners, although big dogs are very placid and good natured and
providing you buy a dog from a reputable breeder and can see the
temperament of the parents you'd be very unlucky to get a bad one.

This is my second Weimaraner and I wouldn't swop him for the world.

Kerry Mason
Brisbane, Australia

undetermined_origin_c/o_listserv_administrator

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Apr 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/1/97
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To all those who have never owned a hunting Weimeraner,

My family as well as myself have raised and trained "weims" for as long
as I can remember. As far as temperment, 99% of all Weims are excellent
with children or as a family dog. In fact, so much so, many people have
exploited hunting lines and created a split breed. Many of the "pet"
owners carelessly breed without consideration of hunting aspects.

As a hunter, Weims are tremendos upland dogs. If you like a close to
moderate ranged dog, then you want a Weimeraner. While then can be
trained in certain blood-lines to run with the rangiest of pointers,
most adhere to a gun-distance range. They are excellent for this reason
on Pheasants and about average on quail. My experience is their strength
is in finding single birds and downed birds. As far as duck-hunting
goes, they are great retrievers in early teal and Goose seasons. And
depending upon what part of the country you live, they can be used for
part of the regular waterfowl season. I would suggest a neoprene vest
for added protection.

If interested in a quality Weim, look up the the Kansas City area's
weimeraner club for information. I know of at least one litter coming
up in the next couple of months who had more champion blood lines than
it knows what to do with (On both sides of the family!)

Good Luck,

Andrew Nantz

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