Moss Prevention

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David B. Higgs

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Feb 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/22/97
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I have a small grassy area on the northeast corner of my house (zone
7) that tends to develop a small amount of moss. I know this is not a
good location for grass due to the shade from the house and deck, but I
am not interested in a moss garden or other 'natural setting'. I this
morning removed the existing moss and have spread shade grass seed in
these small openings.
I have seen home remedies for moss prevention on brick and wood but have
lost this information and really don't know if it work on new and
established grass. Any suggestions on methods to prevent the the return
of moss?

Thanks,
Dave Higgs

Brian Chandley

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Feb 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/25/97
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If you have oak trees I would advise you to give up the fight. If its
is just plain shade, try aerating the area, applying lime, and
completing a soil test. The latter will take the guesswork out of the
process. Aerating is best done in the early fall, when root growth is
strongest, but spring is OK.

Tim Rush

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Feb 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/25/97
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In article <3312637d...@news.ma.ultranet.com>, bmc...@ma.ultranet.com (Brian Chandley) wrote:

>If you have oak trees I would advise you to give up the fight.

In a different mode I have a huge Oak on my front lawn. After attempting to
grow grass last year, I seem to have succeeded in establishing an ideal area
for moss, as it has taken over. What is it about the oak that provides such
a wonderful envoronment for moss? I've heard the leaves are acidic. I'm
debating putting up a fight with the moss this year, but I'd have to say moss
does seem to have its benefits and will probably win!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Tim Rush tr...@mindspring.com
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
www.mindspring.com/~trush/sandbox.html
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

PHOTOMOMMY

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Feb 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/25/97
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I too have moss under my oak trees. If the grass just will not grow is it
better to plan other plants to put around the trees, or will moss be the
ONLY thing that I can get to grow?

I'm a VERY novice gardener. Know just enough to be dangerous :)
Leslie

A.C. Kalnins

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Feb 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/25/97
to PHOTOMOMMY

You need to get some Lime. Lime will adjust the soil
composition to be a higher Ph.

Ph Ph Ph blah blah blah. It's a term I know what it means,
but how does if affect gardens? It does I'm told by experts
and do it yourselfers. I have an evergreen tree and the grass
under it has been taken over by moss. I started last fall
with lime and I'm waiting this spring to see if it starts to go away.


try lime, I'm told anyway. It can be bought in 50lb bags for cheap
prices.

Polly M. Law

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Feb 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM2/27/97
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PHOTOMOMMY wrote:
>
> I too have moss under my oak trees. If the grass just will not grow is it
> better to plan other plants to put around the trees, or will moss be the
> ONLY thing that I can get to grow?
>
> I'm a VERY novice gardener. Know just enough to be dangerous :)
> Leslie
A moss garden can be so lovely and cool, very sophisticated. Mosses have
an astounding variety of textures, colors, forms. You could look at this
as an opportunity not as a shortcoming. Perhaps a moss garden is in
keeping with the *genius* of the place?!

Kellie Sisson Snider

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Mar 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/1/97
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> A moss garden can be so lovely and cool, very sophisticated. Mosses have
> an astounding variety of textures, colors, forms. You could look at this
> as an opportunity not as a shortcoming. Perhaps a moss garden is in
> keeping with the *genius* of the place?!

Yes! I'm wanting some moss for my yard... I have a couple of small
cement sculptures I'd love to have moss gentle crawl up from the bottom.
At my kids' school there is a large rock in the front which has moss all
over it, and it's lovely. I know you can use yogurt to encourage moss
seeds to grow, but where do I get some seeds or whatever it is you
start moss with? Can I swipe a little from the school? Will it start
like that? And I assume it has to be in a shady moist place? Is that
right?

--
Signed, Kellie

My Karma Ran Over My Dogma. It was a catastrophe!
Now my dogma's dead and my karma's out of alignment.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Get in "Knee Deep"! The Internet Pond Society
http://w3.one.net/~rzutt/newsletter.html

Bill Morgan

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Mar 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/1/97
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In article <331874...@worldnet.att.net>, Kellie Sisson Snider
<Kel...@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> > A moss garden can be so lovely and cool, very sophisticated. Mosses have
> > an astounding variety of textures, colors, forms. You could look at this
> > as an opportunity not as a shortcoming. Perhaps a moss garden is in
> > keeping with the *genius* of the place?!
>
> Yes! I'm wanting some moss for my yard... I have a couple of small
> cement sculptures I'd love to have moss gentle crawl up from the bottom.
> At my kids' school there is a large rock in the front which has moss all
> over it, and it's lovely. I know you can use yogurt to encourage moss
> seeds to grow, but where do I get some seeds or whatever it is you
> start moss with? Can I swipe a little from the school? Will it start
> like that? And I assume it has to be in a shady moist place? Is that
> right?
>

I don't know anyplace that sells the spores of moss. Of course, it isn't
hard to find moss in the sporulation stage...

Some people suggest that taking the plants and blenderizing them in
buttermilk is a good way to start: pour it where conditions are favorable,
and you have moss. I have no idea if this is true, but I did hear it
here.

Moss does like moist, shaded locations.

Regards,
Bill

--
Bill Morgan <wtmo...@pilot.msu.edu>
Center for Room Temperature Confusion

Polly M. Law

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Mar 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/1/97
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Kellie Sisson Snider wrote:
>
> > A moss garden can be so lovely and cool, very sophisticated. Mosses have
> > an astounding variety of textures, colors, forms. You could look at this
> > as an opportunity not as a shortcoming. Perhaps a moss garden is in
> > keeping with the *genius* of the place?!
>
> Yes! I'm wanting some moss for my yard... I have a couple of small
> cement sculptures I'd love to have moss gentle crawl up from the bottom.
> At my kids' school there is a large rock in the front which has moss all
> over it, and it's lovely. I know you can use yogurt to encourage moss
> seeds to grow, but where do I get some seeds or whatever it is you
> start moss with? Can I swipe a little from the school? Will it start
> like that? And I assume it has to be in a shady moist place? Is that
> right?
>
> --
> Signed, Kellie
>
> My Karma Ran Over My Dogma. It was a catastrophe!
> Now my dogma's dead and my karma's out of alignment.
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Get in "Knee Deep"! The Internet Pond Society
> http://w3.one.net/~rzutt/newsletter.html


Hi Kellie,

Moss is rather easy to propagate, it likes a moist shady spot. Ask the
school if you can have a piece of the moss- even if it is all dried out
it is still viable- mosses have adapted to unreliable moisture by
effectively going dormant in dry spell. I had a piece of moss rattling
around on the floor of my car for about a year- dry as a bone, it is now
embellishing some rocks on the edge of my pond as green and lush as can
be.

You can then take several approaches, you can lay the piece where you
want it to grow and keep it wet until it takes, you can even divide the
clump and start several places. You can also take the moss and whirr it
in the blender with some buttermilk or yogurt and spread this on the
statue etc, where you want it to grow, again keep it moist. Since the
statue is concrete and that is an alkali environment, you might want to
find a moss that grows naturally on limestones, but if it has weathered
outside for more than a year it may be leached out enough to support any
kind of moss.

Moss also needs to be kept somewhat clear of fallen leaves, it smothers
easily.

Good luck

Mark Snyder

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Mar 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/2/97
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Kellie Sisson Snider <Kel...@worldnet.att.net> wrote in article
<331874...@worldnet.att.net>...
> > A moss garden can be so lovely and cool, very sophisticated.I know you


can use yogurt to encourage moss
> seeds to grow, but where do I get some seeds or whatever it is you
> start moss with? Can I swipe a little from the school? Will it start
> like that? And I assume it has to be in a shady moist place? Is that
> right?

The "recipe" has been on TV a few times - some moss, buttermilk or yogurt
and some sugar, blend well and paint on whatever youo want the moss to grow
on - pots, statues, stines, etc. Takes a few weeks to take, but no seeds
needed. Does need to be in shade, in conditions that moss likes.

Kellie Sisson Snider

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Mar 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/2/97
to

Thanks! I saw some moss growing the other day in the cracks of a sidewalk!
I'll head back over there and get some of that since obviously no one owns
it! I think I'll try the blender routine. Since Its already growing on
cement maybe it wouldn't mind moving to my little statue! Do you think it
would grow on a fountain? I have another concrete foutain sculpture
which I plant to get flowing this summer.

> You can then take several approaches, you can lay the piece where you
> want it to grow and keep it wet until it takes, you can even divide the
> clump and start several places. You can also take the moss and whirr it
> in the blender with some buttermilk or yogurt and spread this on the
> statue etc, where you want it to grow, again keep it moist. Since the
> statue is concrete and that is an alkali environment, you might want to
> find a moss that grows naturally on limestones, but if it has weathered
> outside for more than a year it may be leached out enough to support any
> kind of moss.

--

Kellie Sisson Snider

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Mar 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/2/97
to

> The "recipe" has been on TV a few times - some moss, buttermilk or yogurt
> and some sugar, blend well and paint on whatever youo want the moss to grow
> on - pots, statues, stines, etc. Takes a few weeks to take, but no seeds
> needed. Does need to be in shade, in conditions that moss likes.

THANKS!

Polly M. Law

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Mar 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/2/97
to

Kellie Sisson Snider wrote:
>
> Thanks! I saw some moss growing the other day in the cracks of a sidewalk!
> I'll head back over there and get some of that since obviously no one owns
> it! I think I'll try the blender routine. Since Its already growing on
> cement maybe it wouldn't mind moving to my little statue! Do you think it
> would grow on a fountain? I have another concrete foutain sculpture
> which I plant to get flowing this summer.
>

Sure, the only thing you have to do is keep the site moist until the
moss establishes itself.

Kellie Sisson Snider

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Mar 4, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/4/97
to

> Sure, the only thing you have to do is keep the site moist until the
> moss establishes itself.

I nabbed some moss from the sidewalk today and put it where I want it.
We'll see how it grows!

Bill Morgan

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Mar 9, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/9/97
to

In article <331C9D...@worldnet.att.net>, Kellie Sisson Snider
<Kel...@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> > Sure, the only thing you have to do is keep the site moist until the
> > moss establishes itself.
>
> I nabbed some moss from the sidewalk today and put it where I want it.
> We'll see how it grows!


Another thing that just crossed my mind: there are many types of moss, so
if the first type doesn't take, try others. Of course, picking ones that
live on rock or concrete over those on wood... Maybe a mix would be best
anyway.

> My Karma Ran Over My Dogma. It was a catastrophe!

I thought a catastrophe was when the taxidermist stuffed the wrong end of
that cougar you shot...

Regards,
Bill

--
Bill Morgan
wtmo...@msu.edu

Tony Lupton

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Mar 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/13/97
to

Somebody wrote:

> > > Sure, the only thing you have to do is keep the site moist until
> > > the moss establishes itself.

The other thing you can try is to feed the moss with a little milk. I
haven't tried it myself, but I've seen it on gardening shows.

Tony

--
Tony Lupton * Email: t.lu...@citr.com.au
CiTR Pty Ltd * * Phone: +61 7 3259 2382
339 Coronation Drive * Fax : +61 7 3259 2259
Milton Qld 4064
Australia *

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