Tarragon and Thyme Problem

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cucu...@happy.com

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Jul 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/31/99
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Hello !

I try to grow tarragon and thyme in pots. I use common potting
soil and water the plants once daily but none of them thrive.
What have I done wrong ?

The plants are located in a sunny location and receive direct
sunlight from 3:00 p.m. until sunset. Daily temperature in
summer ranges from 27 to 33 degrees Celcius (80 to 92
degrees Fahrenheit). Is the condition right for these herbs ?

Thanks !
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cucullus
<cucu...@excite.com>

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JAY NICHOLSON

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Jul 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/31/99
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?
I had a serious problem this year with potting soils. Seems nothing would
grow in them.

barnu...@my-deja.com

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Aug 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/1/99
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Are you growing the plants indoors or out? If you're growing them
inside, it could be too hot for them, especially if it's direct
afternoon sun. If it's indirect sun, is it enough? (I realize this
sounds confusing) Tarragon is an artemsia, which likes bright light and
not much pampering. Thyme is pretty tough too. Could be it's too much
water. Atemesias are drought tolerant and thyme has a somewhat shallow
root ball (the roots, especially in younger plants never go very deep.
In more mature plants they do.)Too much water would do either of them
in. If the soil is dry to 1" or 1 1/2" in the pot, then water. What kind
of pots are you using? Clay are best, especially if they are indoors.
When you water, are they standing in water overnight? This could also do
them in. Don't fertilize them much either, a mild dose every two weeks
is ample, full dose once a month is good. You said you use a common
soil-is it potting soil or top soil? Top soil, while generally cheaper,
doesn't have the added perlite/vermiculite that most commericial potting
soils do, which aid in drainage. What condition are the plants in when
you buy them? Are they near any kind of draft-like an air conditioner?
If outside and near one, this will also add to demise. If inside, this
could cause too cool a temperature for them during certain times. Hope
this helps.


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diana cascioli

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Aug 2, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/2/99
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cucu...@happy.com wrote:
>
> Hello !
>
> I try to grow tarragon and thyme in pots. I use common potting
> soil and water the plants once daily but none of them thrive.
> What have I done wrong ?
>
> The plants are located in a sunny location and receive direct
> sunlight from 3:00 p.m. until sunset. Daily temperature in
> summer ranges from 27 to 33 degrees Celcius (80 to 92
> degrees Fahrenheit). Is the condition right for these herbs ?

You could possibly be overwatering the plants. They really only need to
be watered when the soil has dried out. Is the soil always wet? Does it
drain well?

I have my tarragon in an eastern-facing window so they receive alot of
direct and indirect sun. Three pm to sunset may not be enough - try
moving them to a southern or eastern window or putting them outside
where they can get at least 6 hours of sunlight a day.

--
raven- is diana cascioli | Hail to the speaker,
GW Graphic Design | Hail to the knower,
bmeworld.com/raven2 | Joy to him who has understood,
gwis2.circ.gwu.edu/~raven | Delight to those who have listened. -Havamal

Gary Cooper

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Aug 2, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/2/99
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On Sat, 31 Jul 1999 cucu...@happy.com wrote:

> Hello !
>
> I try to grow tarragon and thyme in pots. I use common potting
> soil and water the plants once daily but none of them thrive.
> What have I done wrong ?
>
> The plants are located in a sunny location and receive direct
> sunlight from 3:00 p.m. until sunset. Daily temperature in
> summer ranges from 27 to 33 degrees Celcius (80 to 92
> degrees Fahrenheit). Is the condition right for these herbs ?
>

You don't say where you are, but I've found that neither tarragon nor
thyme tolerates really hot weather well. 90 F or above would definitely
qualify as really hot in this context. Furthermore, your growing site
exposes plants to full sun during the hottest part of the day, so they
must get even hotter than the general ambient temperature.

It's hard to say whether you're watering too much, not enough, or exactly
enough. Wait until the soil in the pot is dry an inch or two below the
surface (feel with your finger), then give it (the soil, not the leaves) a
good soaking.

I've been told that "Wedgwood" thyme tolerates heat better than other
varieties. I'm trying it this year, and so far it's done OK.
Texas tarragon, also called Mexican tarragon or Mexican Mint Marigold, is
a heat-tolerant plant (not closely related to true tarragon) that tastes
very much like tarragon and I've found it to be a good substitute. I've
about given up on raising real tarragon here in Texas, after numerous
failures.

Gary


Green Darner

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Aug 7, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/7/99
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Gary Cooper wrote in message > On Sat, 31 Jul 1999 cucu...@happy.com
wrote:
> >

> You don't say where you are, but I've found that neither tarragon nor
> thyme tolerates really hot weather well. 90 F or above would definitely
> qualify as really hot in this context.

LOL - it's 90+++ degrees (before the heat index) here in Arkansas and the
thyme is alive and kickin'. In fact it's about the only thing that has
survived this heat. Go figure!
Cheers
green darner

DocOsc

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Aug 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/12/99
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>> You don't say where you are, but I've found that neither tarragon nor
>> thyme tolerates really hot weather well. 90 F or above would definitely
>> qualify as really hot in this context.

Here in VA the temps are way over 90 and the only problem my tarragon and thyme
are having is that there doesn't seem to be enough garden for both of them! I
haven't even bothered to water the herbs, as they seem pretty good at fending
for themselves.
Chris & Erika Ashton, Joe & Lexi
doc...@aol.com
"Maybe it's the dancer,
Or maybe it's the dance the dancer dances"

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