Sega Channel Announced

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goldsby,kevin m

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Apr 15, 1993, 9:59:21 AM4/15/93
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Read the following on Prodigy Business News.

Time Warner Entertainment and Sega of America announced
yesterday 4/14/93, plans for the Sega Channel. The
Sega Channel will be an interactive cable tv channel
providing video games. For a low monthly fee subcribers
will be able to access a well stocked and constantly
updated library of games. Subcribers should have a Sega
Genesis home system and will have to obtain a special tuner
decoder cartridge that would attach to the tv cable. Plans
to start this fall in test markets and could be available
to all US cable system operators by early 1994.

Mick

nc31...@wvnvms.wvnet.edu

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Apr 15, 1993, 1:15:41 PM4/15/93
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Hmmmm...

In response to the 3DO, I would guess. Any idea on what that "low
monthly fee" will be taking out of my wallet? And will the "special
tuner decoder cartridge" be available for rent through cable services,
or retail? Questions, questions, questions....

Jeff Bogumil
for private responses: aj...@yfn.ysu.edu

Robert Joseph Sperry

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Apr 16, 1993, 9:02:58 AM4/16/93
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>Hmmmm...
>
>In response to the 3DO, I would guess. Any idea on what that "low
>monthly fee" will be taking out of my wallet? And will the "special
>tuner decoder cartridge" be available for rent through cable services,
>or retail? Questions, questions, questions....
>
>Jeff Bogumil

The "low monthly fee" will be $15 to $20 a month *over* basic cable
subscription rates.

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Robert Sperry University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School
___________________________________________________________________________

Patrick B. Hall

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Apr 16, 1993, 10:48:54 AM4/16/93
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My roommate is selling a Sega Genesis system with Sonic I,
in very nice condition, for $100 obo. Please respond via
email to:
pat...@as.arizona.edu

Alternate email addresses are ph...@noao.edu and m...@ccit.arizona.edu.

Thanks,
Pat Hall

Teh Kao Yang

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Apr 16, 1993, 3:24:54 PM4/16/93
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In article <1qmaq2...@uwm.edu> spe...@convex.csd.uwm.edu (Robert Joseph Sperry) writes:
>
>The "low monthly fee" will be $15 to $20 a month *over* basic cable
>subscription rates.

I think this Sega Channel is a great idea (of course I do, I'm a Sega fan).
To me $15 a month would be a bargain considering what such a channel could
offer to a Genesis owner.

The channel would probably not offer the latest games for you to play, since
Sega doesn't want to hurt cartridge sale, but they might offer playable demos
of the new games. This would be a great way to check out games before buying
them. It is also a lot more convenient than renting since you don't have to
go anywhere and no worries about games being rented out already.

Since the Genesis game library will be huge by the time the channel becomes
available, it will be worth getting it just so you can access the enormous
library of rare and classic Genesis games anytime you want. You can finally
try those games you've only heard of but could never find because they are
so old.

Maybe they'll have some kind of Sega daily Newsletter as well, and you can
probably get game tips or other information from the channel. The only
thing they can't do is offer multiplayer games across the network....

-TK

David Brady

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Apr 16, 1993, 4:53:02 PM4/16/93
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In article <1993Apr15....@porthos.cc.bellcore.com> goldsby,


Anybody remember the Intellivision cable channel? Same idea - different
platform.
--
email: Brady...@Tandem.Com
(Note: This message is from me, not my employer. React accordingly.)

Always remember - David Brady IS Lee Harvey!

David Vanderbyl

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Apr 16, 1993, 5:03:37 PM4/16/93
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teh...@aludra.usc.edu (Teh Kao Yang) writes:

>I think this Sega Channel is a great idea (of course I do, I'm a Sega fan).
>To me $15 a month would be a bargain considering what such a channel could
>offer to a Genesis owner.

I agree it sounds great but there are many questions. How fun will the
games be? Will you be able to record them on you VCR?

>The channel would probably not offer the latest games for you to play, since
>Sega doesn't want to hurt cartridge sale, but they might offer playable demos
>of the new games. This would be a great way to check out games before buying
>them. It is also a lot more convenient than renting since you don't have to
>go anywhere and no worries about games being rented out already.

It would be truly excellent if digitized cartridge based games could come
into your house via the cable. I haven't heard anything about this aside
from the brief post made here, but I'm pretty sure this is not what is
gonna happen. It would just kill cartridge sales.

It's probably gonna be a system where you interact with live video. If
the live video is not playing, then you can't play the game. Great concept
though!

Dmitheon

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Apr 17, 1993, 1:36:10 PM4/17/93
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Hi all,


REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due
the shear number of players. Not to mention, that I don't even think you
can send a signal back over coaxial cable.
I know it's nice to day dream, but please, people.. let's try to
keep our heads on our shoulders.


Dmitri "Dmitheon" Lenna : Anime Fan, and damn proud of it.

E. Kontei

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Apr 17, 1993, 4:51:06 PM4/17/93
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In article <dsv...@rpi.edu>, len...@bray1a.its.rpi.edu (Dmitheon) writes:
>
> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
> this game from say 3pm to 4pm.

Hmm. You could have SEVERAL downloads available at any one slot (by
dividing the channel into TDM sub-channels, maybe?). The size of
a game (2 MBytes, max) is small compared to the throughput of a cable
channel, which means that you could rotate game downlads every so-and-so
minutes. The "record downloads to VHS" is a possibility, although I
suspect they will have safeguards against that (by having digital codes
which are too fast/detailed to be captured with the recording resolution
of analog VHS VCRs, for example).

> Not to mention, that I don't even think you
> can send a signal back over coaxial cable.

You can, but not with the current setup. The lines are there, all we need
are the end-point hardware and a protocol, and awaaaay we go!
--
E n r i q u e C o n t y
The Flip-Flip Man
co...@cbnewsl.att.com
Disclaimer: You're not dealing with AT&T

Adam K. Rixey

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Apr 17, 1993, 6:10:09 PM4/17/93
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Excerpts from netnews.alt.sega.genesis: 17-Apr-93 Re: Sega Channel
Announced Dmit...@bray1a.its.rpi. (585)

> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
> this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due
> the shear number of players. Not to mention, that I don't even think you
> can send a signal back over coaxial cable.

Not necessarily true...already one cable company hopes to have a
500-channel system by the end of the year; with fiber optics, it would
be VERY easy to set up a cable channel where you could choose what
game/movie/television show you wanted.

- AkR
- ar...@andrew.cmu.edu
___
Hey, kids, now there's a free shoggoth in every box of Sugar Coated Cthooloops!

Tim Smith

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Apr 17, 1993, 9:46:06 PM4/17/93
to
In article <dsv...@rpi.edu> len...@rpi.edu writes:
> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
> this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due

If they did a good job of encoding, it would take at most a few seconds
to download a 16 Mb game. They'll probably cycle through the whole library
every few minutes. I seem to recall this was how the Games Network did
it several years ago.

If I were setting up a system like this, I'd use addressable units in the
home. The system would cycle through free games and demos of newer games.
When you wanted to play a newer game, you'd call in. You account would be
charged, and the new game would be inserted into the current cycle, and
your home unit would be told to receive it.

--Tim Smith

Jeff Jeffress

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Apr 19, 1993, 11:48:46 AM4/19/93
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In article <dsv...@rpi.edu>, len...@bray1a.its.rpi.edu (Dmitheon) writes:
|>
|> Hi all,
|>
|>
|> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
|> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
|> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
|> this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due
|> the shear number of players. Not to mention, that I don't even think you
|> can send a signal back over coaxial cable.

Actually, this is not entirely correct. This same cable group
(or maybe a competitor, I forget) already has a prototype of
a system to download movies directly to a decoding box hooked
to your TV on demand. That's right, anytime you want to see a
movie you just phone up and type in your code an the system
downloads the movie and decodes it onto a specified channel.
I believe they will begin small test markets within one year.

Movies, even with special compression still can take up about one
gigabyte of storage space (we can estimate that the total
download time is about 2-3 hours). It doesn't take a big leap
of faith to imagine being able to download (on demand) 2 MBytes
an create a mechanism to make this available to your Genesis.

As for the limitations of coax, I am not qualified to answer
what it is or is not capable of. I do know that the mainstream
cable operators are not the only players though. Most of the
local telcos want to deliver multimedia down your phone line
some day. Not to mention the fact that if there is an adequate
market, the cable companies will be more than happy to replace
that coax.

|> I know it's nice to day dream, but please, people.. let's try to
|> keep our heads on our shoulders.
|>
|>
|> Dmitri "Dmitheon" Lenna : Anime Fan, and damn proud of it.

Later
--
| Jeff Jeffress | Email | Address | Phone |
| Sys. Engineer | | | W (713)560-1039 |
| Landmark | j...@lgc.com | 15150 Memorial | F (713)560-1064 |
| Graphics Corp. | j...@comet.rice.edu | Houston, TX 77079 | B (713)990-8607 |
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Greg House

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Apr 19, 1993, 5:08:49 PM4/19/93
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A cable system with simple coax is certainly capable of interactive
response if the proper hardware is available on both ends of it. A
friend of mine worked for a company which was producing prototype
hardware/software systems to do direct interactive things like movie
selection for pay per view systems way back in 1984. The company's
products never caught up and it folded up, but surely the technology
available today is much more advanced.

Greg

Eliot Wilson

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Apr 20, 1993, 9:26:51 AM4/20/93
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In article <dsv...@rpi.edu> len...@rpi.edu writes:
>
> Hi all,
>
>
> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
> this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due
> the shear number of players. Not to mention, that I don't even think you
> can send a signal back over coaxial cable.
> I know it's nice to day dream, but please, people.. let's try to
> keep our heads on our shoulders.

Here in Cincinnati under the Warner cable system we can send back messages over
the coaxial cable. I'm not sure how they do it, but for our pay-per-view
channels, you just press a red 'authorize' button on the box, and it's sends
a message, you see the show, and get the bill. When it first came out they
even had interactive trivia games on the system. Now video games would cause
much more interaction and the system they have probably couldn't handle the
needed bandwidth to download the game code, but think about fiber optics,
no problem, and maybe they could squeeze alittle out of coax.

-E


>
>
> Dmitri "Dmitheon" Lenna : Anime Fan, and damn proud of it.


--
Eliot Wilson Univ. of Cincinnati UG Computer Science
A-in't
I-t Internet:
X-citing ewi...@ucunix.san.uc.edu

Kit Kimes@AT&T/NCR

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Apr 20, 1993, 10:39:11 AM4/20/93
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From article <Mfo811C00...@andrew.cmu.edu>, by "Adam K. Rixey" <nya...@CMU.EDU>:

> Excerpts from netnews.alt.sega.genesis: 17-Apr-93 Re: Sega Channel
> Announced Dmit...@bray1a.its.rpi. (585)
>
>> REALITY CHECK !! First off it it were a channel, it would
>> have a set program. Remember, you can't just get any game you want any
>> time you want. They'd have a set program. Such as download the demo for
>> this game from say 3pm to 4pm. Networking games would be impossible due
>> the shear number of players. Not to mention, that I don't even think you
>> can send a signal back over coaxial cable.
>
> Not necessarily true...already one cable company hopes to have a
> 500-channel system by the end of the year; with fiber optics, it would
> be VERY easy to set up a cable channel where you could choose what
> game/movie/television show you wanted.

And that is what Sega Channel is going to be a part of. It has already been
announced here in Chicago that TCI will have at least part of the Chicago
cable system wired with fiber optics by next year and have interactive cable
tv available by then. That includes movies on demand. You want to watch
Terminator 2 starting at 7:13pm, no problem. No one else has to want to
watch it at that time. The can call up the same movie starting at 7:20pm
if they want to.

I have not heard whether the Sega Channel will have multiplayer capability
or not, but my guess is no. You should be able to download anything available
at any hour of the day or night that you want to though.

Kit Kimes
AT&T Resource Link (under contract to NCR)
Naperville, IL
...!att!iwcs!kimes (ki...@iwcs.att.com)

Hasit Mehta

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Apr 20, 1993, 3:57:23 PM4/20/93
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In article
Well the SEGA-CD game Jaguar XJ-2002 or something like that is now in
stores. I will probably pick up a copy tomarrow from EB. Does anyone have a
review of this game? The screen shots of this game looked pretty nice and it
is SUPPOSED to be the first SEGA-CD game to "really" use the scaling and
rotation abilities of the SEGA-CD. So if anyone has this game please post a
review if nobody has this game yet then expect a review tomarrow, I hope it
was worth the wait. I have only bought one SEGA-CD game since I bought the
player back in November of 1992! ARGH! Also when will Joe Montana Football
CD
come out and when will Slipheed VR come out? Both of those games look great
in the rags.

--
Hasit S. Mehta ****************************
University of Rochester * PRIMUS SUCKS! *
hm0...@UHURA.CC.ROCHESTER.EDU ****************************
_______________________________________________________________________________

Noah J. Adams

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Apr 20, 1993, 3:48:37 PM4/20/93
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Excerpts from netnews.rec.games.video: 19-Apr-93 Re: Sega Channel
Announced Jeff Jeffress@fontaine.l (2258)

> Actually, this is not entirely correct. This same cable group
> (or maybe a competitor, I forget) already has a prototype of
> a system to download movies directly to a decoding box hooked
> to your TV on demand. That's right, anytime you want to see a
> movie you just phone up and type in your code an the system
> downloads the movie and decodes it onto a specified channel.
> I believe they will begin small test markets within one year.

Right, TCI cable has announced fiber optical cabling to be installed in
test sites (including pittsburgh :}) This is supposed to allow 500
channels as well as such services. TCI was one of the companies named
in the original Sega channel announcement.

> As for the limitations of coax, I am not qualified to answer
> what it is or is not capable of. I do know that the mainstream
> cable operators are not the only players though. Most of the
> local telcos want to deliver multimedia down your phone line
> some day. Not to mention the fact that if there is an adequate
> market, the cable companies will be more than happy to replace
> that coax.

TCI is....with the fiber optic cables this will present no problem 8
Mbits/64Kbps = 125 secs 64kbps is cake. The fiber optic cable system
is designed to be interactice too.

On the down side this means that no, you probably won't be able to
videotape games for later playing.

-Noah Adams (na...@andrew.cmu.edu)
NSA Food: AK-47 Assasinate heroin smuggle Clinton cocaine coup junta Castro
terrorist PLO IRA CIA MI5 revolution LSD conspire DEA Cosa Nostra SLF Islamic
Jihad marijuana bomb hostages hash BATF Fort Knox attack kill crack Edwards Air
Force Base Camp David metamphetamines Interpol Satanic Air Force One and the
overall moral decline of our nation.

All hail Eris!

EAF...@psuvm.psu.edu

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Apr 21, 1993, 2:54:19 PM4/21/93
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My cable box has a phone line going in to it to send back messages for pay per
view.
ed

Lewis Curl

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Apr 21, 1993, 12:31:55 AM4/21/93
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Ethernet cable and coaxial cable are identical and interchageable with the right
connectors. I'm not sure what the transmission capability specs of ethernet
cable are, but it is definitely over the one Mbit/sec. range, so it is possible
to download games in a relatively short time.
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