ATARI 2600 "MILLIONAIRE" GAME

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TTYrant

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Aug 5, 2002, 3:44:19 AM8/5/02
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Since so many programmers seem to be creating new Atari 2600 carts, how about a
version of "Who want's to be a millionaire" for the Atari 2600???

"That cow, pig or chicken that you murdered and ingested will exact it's
revenge upon you from the inside. They're doing so now, and I don't blame them
a bit..."

Griking

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Aug 5, 2002, 9:33:13 AM8/5/02
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No offense, but doesn't the 2600 have enough BAD games as it is?

Robert Morgan

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Aug 5, 2002, 9:41:54 AM8/5/02
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>Since so many programmers seem to be creating new Atari 2600 carts, how about
>a
>version of "Who want's to be a millionaire" for the Atari 2600???

Not sure if there'd be enough memory for more than a few questions. (I always
wondered how they'd planned on doing game show conversions for the 2600 back in
the 80s...) Maybe some Quiz Wiz-like deal where questions are in a book would
work!

unclefreddy

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Aug 5, 2002, 6:40:26 PM8/5/02
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Supercharger! Sorry that's my answer for all ambitious games this day

--
Q: Because it reverses the logical flow of conversation.
A: Why is top posting frowned upon?
remove PORKVIOLENCE to reply to my Reply-To: address

WHAT?!

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Aug 10, 2002, 2:52:25 AM8/10/02
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I think if the GGC (Great Game Company...they eventually became
GameTek) had released those game show games for the 2600, it would be
some type of "video game/board game" hybrid similar to the hybrid
games on the Odyssey^2. I would imagine that TJW would've had a
question and answer book, with TTD and Jeopardy the same way. As much
as I love the 2600, it is way too limited for game show games the
caliber of TPiR, Password Plus, and so on. If they had done TPiR, they
would've been lucky to get just Contestants' Row, 6 pricing games, the
Showcase Showdown (the wheel), and the Showcases. You would have
better luck porting Plinko to the 2600 than TPiR as a whole.

As for Press Your Luck, I hada friend who years ago in the mid 1980s
programmed a primitive version of the PYL board on an Atari
800XL...basically all it was was different colored screens
(full-screen).

Besides the QUICKBASIC version of TJW, I've programmed the following
BASIC games on an Atari 800 : Plinko (as well as a more difficult
version of Plinko which replaces the zeros with "wipeout" spaces which
takes your score all the way down to zero...in this version [I call it
"Extreme Plinko"], you are given the opportunity to quit after you
drop a chip), Range Game, Clock Game, the Showcase Showdown, and the
Showcases.

conj...@sover.net (And & Tony Morse) wrote in message news:<1fglqcu.g8tjlwoqls3wN%conj...@sover.net>...
> Barry L. Laws, Jr. <bigdcald...@wmconnect.com> wrote:
>
> > I'd rather see the "Face The Devil" bonus round from "The Joker's Wild" game
> > show and the "Beat The Dragon" bonus round from "Tic Tac Dough" on the
> > 2600...a programmer should have no difficulty programming these games.
> >
>
> All right, I'll bite. I'd buy these if someone programmed 'em. The High
> Rollers endgame, as well. Standard quiz types would probably bee too
> memory-intensive.
>
> If you want to get obscure, you could do the end game to Bullseye, which
> was similar to the TJW endgame.
>
> Now if someone could do a version of Press Your Luck for the 2600, that
> would kick about a million different kinds of ass.

WHAT?!

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Aug 10, 2002, 2:59:52 AM8/10/02
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Close. All the graphics in the TTD windows were done on Apple ][
computers and written in 6502 assembly code. Nine Apple ][ computers
did the graphics (one for each monitor), and each Apple ][ computer
acted a display slave to an Altair 8030 system. The Altair determined
which Apple ][ would display which whatever (category, X, O, money
amount, TIC, TAC, or the dragon). The display slaves were loaded each
day from cassette recorders. The Altair interfaced to a custom built
control console for the game board.


fla...@aol.com (Steve 'Flash' Juon) wrote in message news:<58d7c7.020807...@posting.google.com>...
> DarkStorm <ra...@crosswinds.net> wrote in message news:<3D5054...@crosswinds.net>...
> > I actually wrote a BASIC program for the C64 that played the bonus round
> > of Tic Tac Dough, and another one for High Rollers' bonus round.
>
> Is it just me, or did the graphics on "Tic Tac Dough" look like they were
> DONE on a Commodore 64 running a BASIC program? I always imagined that if
> I spent enough time mapping it out pixel by pixel my 1701 monitor could make
> a perfect copy of the dreaded dragon, not to mention pop up any of the quiz
> categories from the show (terrible abbreviations and all).
>
> - Steve
>
> PS: I'm not knocking C-64 graphics, just saying Tic Tac Dough obviously
> didn't generate their studio monitors with an Amiga. ;)

Matthew W. Miller

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Aug 10, 2002, 4:54:39 PM8/10/02
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On 9 Aug 2002 23:59:52 -0700, WHAT?! <stonecol...@lycos.com>
wrote:
> fla...@aol.com (Steve 'Flash' Juon) wrote...

>> Is it just me, or did the graphics on "Tic Tac Dough" look like they
>> were DONE on a Commodore 64 running a BASIC program?
> Close. All the graphics in the TTD windows were done on Apple ][
> computers ... each Apple ][ computer acted a display slave to an
> Altair 8030 system.

All right. What are the chances the code for those will show up on
asimov any time soon? :)
--
Matthew W. Miller -- mwmi...@columbus.rr.com

WHAT?!

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Aug 11, 2002, 3:46:41 AM8/11/02
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Well, it would be easier to ask Bob Bishop (yep, the same Bob Bishop
who worked for Apple) to make his TTD programs public domain.

"Matthew W. Miller" <mwmi...@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message news:<slrnalavnd....@dhcp9586174.columbus.rr.com>...

Steve 'Flash' Juon

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Aug 13, 2002, 1:23:08 AM8/13/02
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stonecol...@lycos.com (WHAT?!) wrote in message news:<bd809a01.02080...@posting.google.com>...

> Besides the QUICKBASIC version of TJW, I've programmed the following
> BASIC games on an Atari 800 : Plinko (as well as a more difficult
> version of Plinko which replaces the zeros with "wipeout" spaces which
> takes your score all the way down to zero...

One of the gaming magazines I read back in the 80's had a Plinko clone
in BASIC you could type in and run on Commodore 64. As happy as I was with
this it didn't seem satisfying to me that I could rack up a big score and
not have anything to show for it. After dissecting both a BASIC and a 1541
manual I created a VERY primitive "load score", "save score" routine that
kept the three highest places PLUS initials, and automatically sorted them
to drop the lowest one anytime one was higher. I can't even remember how
I did it now but I suspect it read and wrote the file one byte at a time;
probably the worst programming code ever. All I cared was that it worked. :)
I'm certainly no Paul Slocum!

- Steve

WHAT?!

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Aug 14, 2002, 8:59:28 PM8/14/02
to
Speaking of Commodore 64, I saw a Commodore 64 computer at Goodwill
the other day for $5. I was tempted to buy it, but it didn't have a
power supply and it was missing the 2 key, so I passed, but now I
think I should've went for it because you can probably get a power
supply off eBay, and I imagine somebody can mail a 2 key taken from a
dead C64.

fla...@aol.com (Steve 'Flash' Juon) wrote in message news:<58d7c7.020812...@posting.google.com>...

Richard Hudson

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Aug 19, 2002, 4:02:12 AM8/19/02
to
On 9 Aug 2002 23:52:25 -0700, stonecol...@lycos.com (WHAT?!)
wrote:

>I think if the GGC (Great Game Company...they eventually became
>GameTek) had released those game show games for the 2600, it would be
>some type of "video game/board game" hybrid similar to the hybrid
>games on the Odyssey^2. I would imagine that TJW would've had a
>question and answer book, with TTD and Jeopardy the same way. As much
>as I love the 2600, it is way too limited for game show games the
>caliber of TPiR, Password Plus, and so on. If they had done TPiR, they
>would've been lucky to get just Contestants' Row, 6 pricing games, the
>Showcase Showdown (the wheel), and the Showcases. You would have
>better luck porting Plinko to the 2600 than TPiR as a whole.
>
>As for Press Your Luck, I hada friend who years ago in the mid 1980s
>programmed a primitive version of the PYL board on an Atari
>800XL...basically all it was was different colored screens
>(full-screen).
>
>Besides the QUICKBASIC version of TJW, I've programmed the following
>BASIC games on an Atari 800 : Plinko (as well as a more difficult
>version of Plinko which replaces the zeros with "wipeout" spaces which
>takes your score all the way down to zero...in this version [I call it
>"Extreme Plinko"], you are given the opportunity to quit after you
>drop a chip), Range Game, Clock Game, the Showcase Showdown, and the
>Showcases.


I know people who have made versions of game shows for the pc.

I forgot the URL but look up CROSSBEARER SOFTWARE or Curt King and
you will find a downloadable version of Press Your Luck and other
games.

You can find game show games made for the Apple ][ and C64 at
abandonware sites. Just go to a search engine and type abandonware.

Richard Hudson


The Anti-Corporate Outlaw

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Sep 1, 2002, 2:57:41 AM9/1/02
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Richard Hudson <rxxxxhxx...@snet.net> wrote in message news:<rj71mugg3at2riphq...@4ax.com>...

I've played Curt King's PYL game, and it is a VERY remarkable effort,
although most of the WAV files are of poor sound quality.

There's another producer of game show games for the PC called CDC
Productions. They have made DOS-based games (like The Joker's Wild and
Bullseye...only the game mechanics are in the game...you have to come
up with your own questions and answers...but the Face The Devil and
Avoid The Lightning bonus rounds are flawless...both games include
actual music cues that were used on TJW and Bullseye) and Flash
(Shockwave) games (TJW's Face The Devil, TTD's Beat The Dragon,
Bullseye's Avoid The Lightning, Classic Concentration's bonus game,
and Card Sharks' Money Cards [Bob Eubanks version, meaning that a push
is a no win/no loss, and there are three spare change cards on the
side]). I think CDC is also in the process of making a Flash
adaptation of the bonus round of the short-lived Dream House complete
with the "Dream HOUSE! DREAM House! Dream HOUSE! LOOO-SERRR!" song
which played when the Golden Doors lit up.

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