Bally 25 hole pinball machine

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Louise Brunet

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Jul 31, 2022, 2:49:30 PMJul 31
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Does anybody know what ever happened to the 25 hole Bally pinball machines from the early 1960's that could be found in almost any bar room? They were nickel machines without bumpers or flippers. There was a super screen on the back of the machine that increased the odds of winning if you were able to activate the super screen by putting in an excessive amount of nickels. By winning you were given points which were paid off by the establishment at 5 cents per point. These were gambling machines from the early 60's. Don't know the name of the machines other than BALLY but have not seen any of them since the 60's. Not sure if they were destroyed by Federal/local law agencies because they were confiscated and considered to be non legal gambling devices installed at bar rooms. They could also be found at penny arcade amusement parks but winnings could not be claimed at these locations.

Any information to ease my curiousity would be appreciated.

Mark

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Jul 31, 2022, 6:58:10 PMJul 31
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On 7/31/22 12:49, Louise Brunet wrote:
> Does anybody know what ever happened to the 25 hole Bally pinball machines from the early 1960's that could be found in almost any bar room? They were nickel machines without bumpers or flippers. There was a super screen on the back of the machine that increased the odds of winning if you were able to activate the super screen by putting in an excessive amount of nickels. By winning you were given points which were paid off by the establishment at 5 cents per point. These were gambling machines from the early 60's. Don't know the name of the machines other than BALLY but have not seen any of them since the 60's. Not sure if they were destroyed by Federal/local law agencies because they were confiscated and considered to be non legal gambling devices installed at bar rooms. They could also be found at penny arcade amusement parks but winnings could not be claimed at these locations.
>
> Any information to ease my curiousity would be appreciated.


There probably aren't many available in public any more but there are
plenty in the hands of collectors. It tends to be a smaller crowd than
pinball collectors because there are fewer machines, they're not as
popular and they're more challenging to work on. A great site for
history and technical information is https://bingo.cdyn.com/

/Mark
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