Best Interactive Fiction Game Ending

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brian...@yahoo.com

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Jul 28, 2007, 3:36:35 PM7/28/07
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I'd like to know which Interactive Fiction Game everbody thinks has
the best ending. Please remember to put in a spoiler space if you're
going to talk about the details of the ending. I'll go first.

I think Infofom's A Mind Forever Voyaging has the best ending out of
the Interactive Fiction games I have played. The Epilogue in the game
is beautiful, and very well written, especially the last two screens
of text.

Brian

u...@mail.ru

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Jul 28, 2007, 4:19:09 PM7/28/07
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On 28 , 23:36, "briansip...@yahoo.com" <briansip...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

Blue Chairs by Chris Klimas.

DenizenOfShadows

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Jul 28, 2007, 10:30:21 PM7/28/07
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AMFV is indeed terrific. If we're talking Infocom games, I would put
Trinity at or near the top as well. That ending absolutely blew me away.
All roads lead to Kensington Gardens...

What about non-commercial IF games?

<brian...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1185651395.3...@d55g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...

Zer

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Jul 29, 2007, 9:29:07 AM7/29/07
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of course - AMFV and Spider&Web (though it rather "best middle-
ending" :)

All Roads and Insight on my list as well


Jerome West

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Jul 29, 2007, 2:32:51 PM7/29/07
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Slouching Toward Bedlam is probably my favourite IF ending of all
time. Spider & Web is right up there with it though.

Glenn P.,

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Jul 30, 2007, 12:07:10 AM7/30/07
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On 29-Jul-07 at 2:30am -0000, <castrova...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> All roads lead to Kensington Gardens...

Speaking whereof -- I'm quite SURE I've read that line, "All Prams Lead
To Kensington Gardens" (inside the umbrella) in some book or other before,
but for the life of me I cannot think where!!! Does anybody know...? Can
anyone tell me...???

-- _____
----------------------------- {~._.~} Astro Boy sets the pace,
"Glenn P.," _( Y )_ On your flight into space;
<C128UserD...@FVI.Net> (:_~*~_:) What can I do, to be like you?
----------------------------- (_)-(_) And become a real Astro Boy?

:: Take Note Of The Spam Block On My E-Mail Address! ::

Andrew Kemp

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Jul 30, 2007, 5:08:13 PM7/30/07
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On 30 Jul 2007, C128UserD...@fvi.net wrote:

On 29-Jul-07 at 2:30am -0000, <castrova...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>> All roads lead to Kensington Gardens...
>
> Speaking whereof -- I'm quite SURE I've read that line, "All Prams
> Lead To Kensington Gardens" (inside the umbrella) in some book or
> other before, but for the life of me I cannot think where!!! Does
> anybody know...? Can anyone tell me...???

The Little White Bird; or, Adventures in Kensington Gardens -- J M Barrie

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1376

"All perambulators lead to the Kensington Gardens."

--
Andrew

DenizenOfShadows

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Jul 30, 2007, 8:45:09 PM7/30/07
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Ahhh, that makes sense.

Thanks

"Andrew Kemp" <use...@pell.uklinux.net> wrote in message
news:87ps297...@onyx.unlink.co.uk...

Glenn P.,

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Jul 31, 2007, 10:44:56 PM7/31/07
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On 30-Jul-07 at 10:08pm +0100, <use...@pell.uklinux.net> wrote:

>> Speaking whereof -- I'm quite SURE I've read that line, "All Prams
>> Lead To Kensington Gardens" (inside the umbrella) in some book or
>> other before, but for the life of me I cannot think where!!! Does
>> anybody know...? Can anyone tell me...???

> The Little White Bird; or, Adventures in Kensington Gardens -- J M Barrie

> http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1376

> "All perambulators lead to the Kensington Gardens."

Good God, no WONDER I couldn't remember or find it! It's been YEARS since
I've read "The Little White Bird" -- it's downright OBSCURE! -- and didn't
even remember that I HAD read it, until you brought up the title! Sheesh.

It is, however, the precursor to "Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens" (which
is, in turn, the precursor to "Peter Pan And Wendy", which is the tale
that most people are familiar with).

BTW, good searching! What were your search terms?

--_____
{~._.~} >>>> [ "Glenn P.," <C128UserD...@FVI.Net> ] <<<<
_( Y )_ -----------------------------------------
(:_~*~_:) [Disconsolate wail]: "I gotta BLUEBERRY for a daughter!"
(_)-(_) (From: "Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory")

Andrew Kemp

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Aug 1, 2007, 2:40:50 PM8/1/07
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On 1 Aug 2007, C128UserD...@fvi.net wrote:

On 30-Jul-07 at 10:08pm +0100, <use...@pell.uklinux.net> wrote:

>>> Speaking whereof -- I'm quite SURE I've read that line, "All Prams
>>> Lead To Kensington Gardens" (inside the umbrella) in some book or
>>> other before, but for the life of me I cannot think where!!! Does
>>> anybody know...? Can anyone tell me...???
>
>> The Little White Bird; or, Adventures in Kensington Gardens -- J M
>> Barrie
>
>> http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1376
>
>> "All perambulators lead to the Kensington Gardens."
>
> Good God, no WONDER I couldn't remember or find it! It's been YEARS
> since I've read "The Little White Bird" -- it's downright OBSCURE! --
> and didn't even remember that I HAD read it, until you brought up the
> title! Sheesh.

[...]

> BTW, good searching! What were your search terms?

"lead to kensington gardens" (with the quotes) on Google. The eighth
and final result is a link to a different transcription without the
"the" before "Kensington", for some reason. Searching on the title and
author then turned up many other copies of the text with the extra word.

I am enjoying the story, so thanks for the pointer!

--
Drew

John W. Kennedy

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Aug 1, 2007, 3:35:13 PM8/1/07
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Glenn P., wrote:
> It is, however, the precursor to "Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens" (which
> is, in turn, the precursor to "Peter Pan And Wendy", which is the tale
> that most people are familiar with).

A) I thought (but am open to correction) that "Peter Pan in Kensington
Gardens" was essentially an extract from "The Little White Bird".

B) The /play/ "Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up" comes between
"Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens" and the book "Peter and Wendy" (later
retitled "Peter Pan"). It was in the play that the story was wholly
rewritten into the form we are familiar with; "Peter and Wendy" is
essentially a novelization of the play.

--
John W. Kennedy
"You can, if you wish, class all science-fiction together; but it is
about as perceptive as classing the works of Ballantyne, Conrad and W.
W. Jacobs together as the 'sea-story' and then criticizing _that_."
-- C. S. Lewis. "An Experiment in Criticism"

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