P.G. Wodehouse in IF?

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Mark Borok

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Mar 7, 2002, 10:14:58 PM3/7/02
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Has anyone yet done an IF inspired by P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves and
Wooster)? If not, why not? It's perfect material. Somebody get on it.
If I wasn't a neophyte, I'd do it myself.

--Mark

scrambled Digby McWiggle

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Mar 8, 2002, 12:50:21 AM3/8/02
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In article <070320022214584589%mbo...@mindspring.com>, Mark Borok <mbo...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>Has anyone yet done an IF inspired by P.G. Wodehouse


Dash it! The cat's out of the proverbial whatsit now.

Word on the street is that, yes, somebody IS working on a PGW-based game, but
we are not at liberty to divulge any more information, except to say that
completion of the aforementioned is not expected until at least next year.

I'd been hoping no-one would mention PGW around here - I'm tired of being
beaten to the mark. Someone organised a Chicken-Comp just before I finished my
chicken game, and somebody else held a Dragon-Comp right before I released my
dragon game, so I was kind of hoping that PGW would be keeping a pretty low
profile in the next year or so.

So if any cove decides to organise a PGW-comp he'd better jolly well look out
for his cheerios, because I know a chap with a handy talent for dishing out
retribution. And I think you know who I mean.

Tootle-pip,
Digby

Peter Seebach

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Mar 7, 2002, 11:55:35 PM3/7/02
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I don't think it's possible for the likes of us to duplicate the writing
style.

Mostly, though, it's because you can't expect the player to be as witty
as Jeeves, and there'd be no *point* in playing Wooster.

-s
--
Copyright 2002, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach / se...@plethora.net
$ chmod a+x /bin/laden Please do not feed or harbor the terrorists.
C/Unix wizard, Pro-commerce radical, Spam fighter. Boycott Spamazon!
Consulting, computers, web hosting, and shell access: http://www.plethora.net/

Mark Borok

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Mar 8, 2002, 3:08:35 AM3/8/02
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In article <3c884447$0$79560$3c09...@news.plethora.net>, Peter Seebach
<se...@plethora.net> wrote:

> In article <070320022214584589%mbo...@mindspring.com>,
> Mark Borok <mbo...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> >Has anyone yet done an IF inspired by P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves and
> >Wooster)? If not, why not? It's perfect material. Somebody get on it.
> >If I wasn't a neophyte, I'd do it myself.
>
> I don't think it's possible for the likes of us to duplicate the writing
> style.
>
> Mostly, though, it's because you can't expect the player to be as witty
> as Jeeves, and there'd be no *point* in playing Wooster.
>
> -s

Actually, all the wit comes from Wooster, or from Wodehouse via
Wooster. In any case, the game would have to be written in first person
from B.W.'s point of view. For instance,

>read telegram

The telegram is from my Aunt Dahlia and it's a pip.

>call jeeves

Putting my rubber d. resolutely down on the edge of the tub, I send out
a call that echoes 'round the hills and rills and so forth. Jeeves
shimmers in instanter.

I admit, the task is a daunting one, but not impossible. The hardest
part is having at your command all the quotes and lines of verse that
Wodehouse uses.

"What is it the cat in the adage is wont to do, Jeeves?"

"Lets 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would', sir."

Jeeves would make for a great in-game hint system:

>hint

I believe the best way to placate a Yorkshire Terrier is with a piece
of steak, or, failing that, a sausage has been known to be effective.

And so forth.

--Mark

Magnus Olsson

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Mar 8, 2002, 4:34:36 AM3/8/02
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In article <3c884447$0$79560$3c09...@news.plethora.net>,
Peter Seebach <se...@plethora.net> wrote:
>Mostly, though, it's because you can't expect the player to be as witty
>as Jeeves, and there'd be no *point* in playing Wooster.

I think playing Wooster would be a rather interesting experience -
in most of the stories, Bertie does his best to solve all the problems
he's facing by himself, and Jeeves only enters the picture when he
fails.

So perhaps a game (not necessarily Jeeves & Wooster) where all your
attempts at solving puzzles fail in unexpected ways, and your NPC
sidekick has to step in and solve them for you, but only after you've
tried (a game where you could just ask Jeeves to solve all your
problems would, of course, be rather pointless)?

--
Magnus Olsson (m...@df.lth.se, m...@pobox.com)
------ http://www.pobox.com/~mol ------

Dennis G. Jerz

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Mar 8, 2002, 9:57:02 AM3/8/02
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It's not exactly what you mean, but check this out...

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~alexk/jeeves/

--
Dennis G. Jerz, Ph.D.; (715)836-2431
Dept. of English; U Wisc.-Eau Claire
419 Hibbard, Eau Claire, WI 54702
------------------------------------
Literacy Weblog: www.uwec.edu/jerzdg


Dan Schmidt

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Mar 8, 2002, 5:30:39 PM3/8/02
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digby_m...@liamtoh.moc (scrambled) (Digby McWiggle) writes:

| In article <070320022214584589%mbo...@mindspring.com>, Mark Borok <mbo...@mindspring.com> wrote:
| >Has anyone yet done an IF inspired by P.G. Wodehouse
|
| Dash it! The cat's out of the proverbial whatsit now.
|
| Word on the street is that, yes, somebody IS working on a PGW-based
| game

I hope it wasn't Adam.

--
http://www.dfan.org

Andrew Plotkin

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Mar 8, 2002, 6:06:37 PM3/8/02
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Well, that implies a whole world of pain, which I will (entirely
unnecessarily) instantiate for you...

"Blast it, Jeeves, I seem to be impaled to the jigger-line on -- just
a mo -- on a giant hairy throbbing moose."

--Z

"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the borogoves..."
*
* Make your vote count. Get your vote counted.

Carl Muckenhoupt

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Mar 8, 2002, 10:34:01 PM3/8/02
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In article <3c884447$0$79560$3c09...@news.plethora.net>,
se...@plethora.net says...

>
> Mostly, though, it's because you can't expect the player to be as witty
> as Jeeves, and there'd be no *point* in playing Wooster.

Wodehouse wrote a great deal other than Jeeves stories. IF set in
Blandings Castle could work - I don't think Lord Emsworth would be a good
PC, but Blandings always seemed to have some young man trying to win
someone's hand in marriage (in contrast to the Jeeves stories, where
marriage is avoided like the plague). Or a Mulliner-based game - the
Mulliner stories tend to be more stylized and slapstick-based, which is
to say, more suited to unrealistic NPC's and object-based puzzles. Or
perhaps a golf story, using the Textfire Golf engine...

Jim Fisher

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Mar 8, 2002, 11:06:28 PM3/8/02
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"Mark Borok" <mbo...@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:080320020308352624%mbo...@mindspring.com...

> In any case, the game would have to be written in first person
> from B.W.'s point of view.

That's easily done. The ORLibrary has a module which allows the default
messages to chang between 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person at any point in the game.
(And Present and Past Tense as well).

(This advertisment paid for by the Foundation for ORLib... um, something or
other.)

--
Jim (AT) OnyxRing (DOT) com
Visit "An Inform Developer's Guide" or browse the
"ORLibrary" extensions to the standard library at
www.OnyxRing.com
----------------------
Some days you eat the code; some days the code eats you

David Keller

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Mar 16, 2002, 3:44:48 PM3/16/02
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"Carl Muckenhoupt" <ca...@wurb.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.16f34cb2e...@News.CIS.DFN.DE...

> In article <3c884447$0$79560$3c09...@news.plethora.net>,
> se...@plethora.net says...
> >
> > Mostly, though, it's because you can't expect the player to be as witty
> > as Jeeves, and there'd be no *point* in playing Wooster.
>
> Wodehouse wrote a great deal other than Jeeves stories. IF set in
> Blandings Castle could work - I don't think Lord Emsworth would be a good
> PC, but Blandings always seemed to have some young man trying to win
> someone's hand in marriage (in contrast to the Jeeves stories, where
> marriage is avoided like the plague).
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

No idea what copyright questions this might involve but I like the idea
enough to toss my devalued 2¢ worth.

A Blandings Castle setting seems to have possibilities. The remarkably
vague Lord Emsworth would be a challenging character of any sort to use but
I'd imagine i-f text game writers like many sorts of challenges. I'd think
he could be used effectively in some role by a sufficiently inspired game
writer.

Anybody thinking of Whiffle on The Care Of The Pig as a sort of Encyclopedia
Frozzica equivalent? *g*

David K


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