Favorite Infocom Moment

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Rusty Wright

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Aug 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/19/96
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Every moment with Floyd was memorable.

J. I. Drasner

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Aug 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/19/96
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Excellent question!

The roller coaster and log flume descriptions from Sorcerer. My stomach
actually did a couple of loops while reading the superb description...and
I just loved that this wonderful bit of prose led to absolutely nothing!
It was just there for background.

The end of Trinity. Talk about your stomach doing loops...actually mine
just sank.

The fate of the castle in Zork Zero (spoilers withheld for those who
haven't gotten there) -- beautiful.

All of the "sample transcripts". I remember every time I'd get a new
Infocom game (after the grey boxes were instituted...yes, I had that great
brown folder for Deadline), the very first thing I'd do was open it up,
bypass all the goodies, and go straight for the sample transcript.

Joey

****************************************************
American Gothic fanatic or just a tourist in Trinity?
Read The Trinity Guardian: http://www.best.com/~owls/AG/
****************************************************
Guildenstern: He's -- melancholy.
Player: Melancholy?
Rosencrantz: Mad.
Alice: But I don't want to go among mad people.
Cheshire Cat: Oh, you can't help that, we're all mad here.
(From "Rosencrantz & Guildenstern in Wonderland")
****************************************************
Johanna "Joey" Drasner: ow...@best.com (San Francisco)
****************************************************

Jordan M Anderson

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Aug 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/19/96
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Excerpts from netnews.rec.games.int-fiction: 19-Aug-96 Favorite Infocom
Moment by Matthew Mur...@wsunix.ws
> (2) The epilogue of A Mind Forever Voyaging. Sorry, I'm not typing any of
> it here. If you don't know what it is, you'll have to play the game.
> Needless to say, it's great--one of the best endings in computer gaming
> history.

I'd say the epilogue is only a truly great moment AFTER you've
experienced the rest of AMFV :). AMFV is the only game that has ever
really made me angry and hurt. The ending is a splendid redemption.

Jordan

John Menichelli

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Aug 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/19/96
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Matthew Murray wrote:
>
> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
> Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
> would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.

[Snip]

My favorite moment was in the Zork I (I think it was Zork I; it's been a
while). Anyway, I was at the entrance to Hades and getting frustrated, so
I burned the book. The response was something like, "A thundering voice
booms, "WRONG, CRETIN!" You notice you've been turned into a pile of ash."
I still get a laugh over that one.

John Menichelli
meni...@pixi.com

Matthew Murray

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Aug 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/19/96
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Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom. A
few of mine:

(1) The black Infocom poster from 1984. "A human never stands so tall as
when stooping to help a small computer." A great, true statement, and a
great poster (hanging on my wall to this day).

(2) The epilogue of A Mind Forever Voyaging. Sorry, I'm not typing any of
it here. If you don't know what it is, you'll have to play the game.
Needless to say, it's great--one of the best endings in computer gaming
history.

(3) The back of the Suspended box: "...And you would not awake, so they
promised, until your 500 years had elapsed--barring, of course, the most
dire emergency. Then, and only then, you would be awakened to save your
planet by strategically manipulating six robots, each of whom perceives
the world differently. But such a catastrophe, you have been assured,
could not possibly occur. Good morning." Classic Infocom humor.

So, what does anyone else think?

================================================================================
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================================================================================
The Church of Scientology is attempting to suppress free speech on the Internet.
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Russell Wain Glasser

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I
think
> Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think
it
> would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about
Infocom.

One of my favorite moments in getting ANY new Infocom game was
reading through the sample transcript in the package, I guess because
they could afford to be so much more silly and illogical than they
would in a real game.
I loved the moment in A Mind Forever Voyaging when, having finished
wandering through the nightmarish 2071, I returned to the present and
checked the simulation controller, only to be told that there was now a
simulation available in 2081. I think my exact words were, "OH MY GOD,
THERE'S MORE??? I don't want to see this..."
I definitely loved the time travel scenario in Sorcerer. I had to
think about it a few times before I figured out what had happened.
(The end of Legend's Timequest, which was of course basically the same
puzzle rehashed, was also terrific.)
Oh yeah, and also I liked all of Trent's / Tiffany's surprising
resurrections in Leather Goddesses, and the last eight moves of the
game were a major crackup.

John Switzer

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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In article <svenl2u...@tuna2.Berkeley.EDU>,

Rusty Wright <ru...@tuna2.berkeley.edu> wrote:
>Every moment with Floyd was memorable.

Also when you try to zifmia (summon) the Implementers in
Enchanter. You suddenly see the two programmers appear in
the sky and they say something like "what the heck is this?",
"I don't know, must be a bug," "here, I'll fix it."

Speaking of Enchanter, it looks like Infocom or Activision
edited the hints booklet that's part of Infocom Masterpieces
a bit. There's one question in there about whether Enchanter
is Zork IV. The first set of answers imply definitely not,
and then the next question is "will there be a sequel to
Enchanter?"

In the original hint book, the answer was "of course, Zork V."
In the revised version, this has become "Sorceror," which is
accurate, but not as funny as the original.
--
John Switzer | Finding an apparent paradox, whether in matters
| of faith or science, simply means some of your
jswi...@aimnet.com | underlying assumptions are flawed.
*** Access the Congressional Record at http://thomas.loc.gov ***

Jon A. Preston

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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: reading through the sample transcript in the package, I guess because

: they could afford to be so much more silly and illogical than they
: would in a real game.

They were pretty funny!

My favorite was when I first bought Zork1 and played it. I had only
played King's Quest before that, and I assumed that all games had pretty
pictures (I was 12 years old!). So I was pretty upset when I was playing
and no graphics. Then I discovered the trap door and thoght to myself,
"of course - that was just an intro, this is the real game".

> D

....

No graphics, but looking back, it was the best thing that could have
happened. It was months later and many clues (I had to buy the clue book)
before I completed the game.

And I'm very happy that Zork (or the other Infocom IFs) did not have graphics!

jP

--
----------------- Jon A. Preston (gt5...@acme.gatech.edu) -----------------
"If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit." - John 15:5

Michael C. Martin

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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John Menichelli wrote:

>
> Matthew Murray wrote:
> >
> > Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> > Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> > included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
> > Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
> > would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.
>
> [Snip]


The first Infocom game I ever played was ZORK II. In the game there are
3 spheres which, when combined, form a black sphere which frees a demon
inside. If you got yourself killed, you came back to life inside the
spheres, talk to the imprisoned demon, and he would free you in the
hopes that you may return the favor.

Well, one time I was killed AFTER I had already freed the demon. You
still reappear inside the sphere, but instead of being brought back to
life, the demon is now laughing at you, looking in at you from outside
the sphere and the game ends!

I thought that level of attention to detail was just amazing!

Mike

Robert Masenten

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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In article <Pine.OSF.3.92.960819...@unicorn.it.wsu.edu>,

Matthew Murray <i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu> wrote:
>(2) The epilogue of A Mind Forever Voyaging. Sorry, I'm not typing any of
>it here. If you don't know what it is, you'll have to play the game.
>Needless to say, it's great--one of the best endings in computer gaming
>history.

A Mind Forever Voyaging is my favorite computer game and is very well
done; I had reservations about the ending, however...

<Spoilers>

The world shown in the ending is a wonderful contrast to the
earlier, darker simulation runs. I had trouble accepting, however,
that the main character would choose to turn his back on reality and
be permently imprisoned in what is, ultimatly, an artificial world.
No matter accurate the simulation may be, if someone in the real world
choses to turn off PRISM's power (or turn off his cooling system) then
Perry Sim is dead (and has no way to see it coming or even to stop it
if he did since there is apparantly no way to leave simulation mode
again). Everything that PRISM does in the last part to thwart the
Senator's plan is done outside of simulation mode.
Just my $0.02

Robert Masenten

Damien P. Neil

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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In article <4vbeel$g...@sjx-ixn6.ix.netcom.com>,

Russell Wain Glasser <rgla...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> One of my favorite moments in getting ANY new Infocom game was
>reading through the sample transcript in the package, I guess because
>they could afford to be so much more silly and illogical than they
>would in a real game.

The sample transcripts were great.

> I loved the moment in A Mind Forever Voyaging when, having finished
>wandering through the nightmarish 2071, I returned to the present and
>checked the simulation controller, only to be told that there was now a
>simulation available in 2081. I think my exact words were, "OH MY GOD,
>THERE'S MORE??? I don't want to see this..."

Contrariwise, I disliked the epilogue of AMFV. It might have hurt, but
I would have rather remained in reality, than continued living a lie.
(No matter how nice.) Furthermore, I disliked the `happily ever after'
aspect of it: it seemed to trivialize the problems at hand in the world
that they should all be so neatly solved and packaged up.

> I definitely loved the time travel scenario in Sorcerer. I had to
>think about it a few times before I figured out what had happened.

Sorcerer. I have to finish that one some day. (Will, as soon as I
locate the Masterpieces collection somewhere. I had it from LTOI I, but
can't seem to find my disks.)

> Oh yeah, and also I liked all of Trent's / Tiffany's surprising
>resurrections in Leather Goddesses, and the last eight moves of the
>game were a major crackup.

I just recently finished LGOP. Great game! I began it about two years
ago with a friend; we made it almost to the end, on the last day we were
in the same city. I've been waiting since then to meet up with him and
finish it. Finally did last week.

The really odd thing, though: the first time through, we completely missed
Trent! We just never noticed the existance of the cell he is in...it was
quite a shock this time through, seeing all the neat deaths/ressurections
we had missed. :>

- Damien

aul...@koala.scott.net

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Aug 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/20/96
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I'd have to say my favorite Infocom moment happened at school in
about 1986 or '87. My friend and I had been playing Spellbreaker
months earlier and got stuck at the part where if you do it wrong,
not only do you die, but the session ends. Not fun on a C64 that
you have to reboot and reload when that happens.

SPOILERS


One day at lunch he just up and said "You know that puzzle in
Spellbreaker? Maybe it's like Back to the Future, as in you have
to get everything right in the past or the future gets screwed up."
(or words to that effect). The magnitude and beauty of that simple
revelation still ring within me. From that point on, it was smooth
sailing -- until we eventually had to order the invisiclues to
figure out the outcropping. As I recall, not only is the puzzle
annoying, but the hints from the invisiclues are even more annoying.
They give you some hints and crap about freezing the cubes together
to make a bridge, then say that's not how do to it, then tell you
really how to do it. Man, that bugged me. Call that my LEAST favorite
Infocom moment. But don't hold me to it. I haven't played Journey
or Shogun or Arthur yet.

That is all,

Joe


Jennifer R Popovic

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Aug 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/21/96
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: > > Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
: > > Infocom moments?

"It is dark, you are likely to be eaten by a grue."

For some reason, this one still cracks me up after about 10 years!

cheers!
Jen

Kim Gall

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Aug 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/22/96
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Hi!
Mine was in "Planetfall" when Floyd "died" and that song. I remember
feeling very sad.
Kim Gall
kg...@interaccess.com

Russell Wain Glasser

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Aug 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/22/96
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ALERT: MINOR SPOILERS FOR AMFV AHEAD


In <4vd52s$1...@vccsouth-19.its.rpi.edu> ne...@vccsouth-19.its.rpi.edu


(Damien P. Neil) writes:
>
>In article <4vbeel$g...@sjx-ixn6.ix.netcom.com>,
>Russell Wain Glasser <rgla...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>> I loved the moment in A Mind Forever Voyaging when, having
finished
>>wandering through the nightmarish 2071, I returned to the present and
>>checked the simulation controller, only to be told that there was now
a
>>simulation available in 2081. I think my exact words were, "OH MY
GOD,
>>THERE'S MORE??? I don't want to see this..."
>
>Contrariwise, I disliked the epilogue of AMFV. It might have hurt,
but
>I would have rather remained in reality, than continued living a lie.
>(No matter how nice.) Furthermore, I disliked the `happily ever
after'
>aspect of it: it seemed to trivialize the problems at hand in the
world
>that they should all be so neatly solved and packaged up.

Nohow. 2081 was not the epilogue, 2091 was. 2071 was the horrible
world in which you only get food every three days, monkeys get tortured
in the zoo, most books are banned, the Church has taken over the world,
and the police shoot old man on sight after curfew. 2081 is the world
where you die no matter what you do.
I didn't say I liked the epilogue. I said I liked the moment of
truth in between 2071 and 2081, realizing that things would get even
more horrible and perverse than they already were.
(Actually, I did like the epilogue. But I liked exploring the
nightmare worlds better.)

Glen Smith

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Aug 22, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/22/96
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In article <Pine.OSF.3.92.960819...@unicorn.it.wsu.edu>,
i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu says...

>
> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
>Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
>included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
>Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
>would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.


I liked the question in Planetfall's questionnaire:
(this is from memory, so it may not be 100% accruate, but I think it is)

Do you smoke?
A) Yes
B) No
C) Not sure
D) Haven't looked

-Glen


Malcolm Symonds

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Aug 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/23/96
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Matthew Murray (i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu) writes:
> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think

(stuff deleted)


>
> So, what does anyone else think?
>
> ================================================================================
> Matthew A. Murray - mmu...@wsu.edu - http://www.wsu.edu:8000/~i9717029
> ================================================================================
> The Church of Scientology is attempting to suppress free speech on the Internet.
> For more information, and details on how you can protect your rights, visit:
>
> http://www.cybercom.net/~rnewman/scientology/home.html
> ================================================================================
>

Hmmm..so many moments,so little time...:-)

Here's a few of mine...(Warning! HGTTG,LGOP,and Spellbreaker spoilers ahead!)

**********spoiler space**************


Hitchhiker's-If you don't eat the peanuts. A long spiel about your
unfortunate death causing the evolution of the cosmos to a higher
spiritual plane.
"However,none of this matters,because you are dead."

LGOP-using the T-remover on the tray,then examining the newly created object.
"It looks like little Ray Whats-His-Name from the third grade."

Spellbreaker-Solving that damn avalanche puzzle. What clued me in was
the description of the rocks as a "continuous curtain above you". Needed hints
for the outcropping,though.


Finishing any of these great games was a favourite (and rare) moment.

Malcolm Symonds
Infocommie for Life


Glen Smith

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Aug 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/24/96
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> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
>Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
>included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
>Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
>would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.


Try "jumping" in Zork at various places, like inside the white house...

:)


-Glen


Russell L. Bryan

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Aug 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/24/96
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Damien P. Neil wrote:

> Contrariwise, I disliked the epilogue of AMFV. It might have hurt, but
> I would have rather remained in reality, than continued living a lie

> (No matter how nice).

I don't know about this. As the AI in AMFV, you fully believed in the lie
for most of your "life." In fact, that lie WAS your life except for the
short time you were brought out of it. My impression is that the artificial
life was as real to the AI as your life is to you. It would be equivalent to
your sitting here, right now, reading this sentence in front of your
computer. You can smell dinner cooking in the kitchen, your cat (Austin?)
sitting on your lap, your girlfriend reading over your shoulder and resting a
hand on your back. Imagine if I were to tell you that at the moment you
finish this sentence, this reality will shatter, and you will discover that
you are a computer program. Your world is a laboratory, your eyes are ten
fisheye lenses affixed to its walls, your ears a microphone, your arms, legs
and heart gone. Everyone you have ever loved has ceased to exist. You have
about as much control over your environment as a thermostat.

Personally, I would have made the same choice. I'd wake up from the
nightmare, put an arm around my girlfriend, and go back to sleep.

-- Russ

John Switzer

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Aug 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/25/96
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I forget which game it appeared in, but "Leather Goddesses" comes to mind,
but there was one room whose description included the word "noisome." If
you give the command "listen," the response is a wonderful suggestion that
you look up noisome in the dictionary.

Shoot! Now I'll have to replay all the games just to find that description.
Ah well, someone has to do it.
--
John Switzer | A paradox is just nature's way of telling you
| that some of your underlying assumptions are
jswi...@aimnet.com | wrong.

aul...@koala.scott.net

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Aug 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/25/96
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In article <4vndu7$v...@data.csw.net>, Glen Smith <ksm...@CSWNET.COM> wrote:
>In article <Pine.OSF.3.92.960819...@unicorn.it.wsu.edu>,
>i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu says...
>>
>> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
>>Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
>>included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
>>Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it
>>would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.
>
>

So I've already posted on this once, but I have another one I thought of.

C64 players will know this one. I don't know about other platforms.

Situation: You've been stuck on a puzzle for a while, trying different
things to no avail.

Action: You have a new idea of something to try and type it in.

Response: The machine pauses a seecond, then HITS THE FLOPPY DRIVE!
You KNOW you've done something right when the 1541 fires up, even
before you read the result, because the alternative (you die) has
that distinct shuddering sound. Success and failure have different
sounds.

Then there is that pleasant surprise when success occasionally makes a
sound that makes you THINK you have died, but you really didn't.

I really miss that.

I have a whole philosophy of why IF on a slower machine like the C64
was more enjoyable than the quick response I get from playing on a PC,
but that is for a different thread at a different time.

That is all,

Joe


Torbj|rn Andersson

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Aug 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/27/96
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jswi...@aimnet.com (John Switzer) wrote:

> I forget which game it appeared in, but "Leather Goddesses" comes to mind,
> but there was one room whose description included the word "noisome." If
> you give the command "listen," the response is a wonderful suggestion that

> you look up noisome in the ydictionary.


>
> Shoot! Now I'll have to replay all the games just to find that description.
> Ah well, someone has to do it.

I'm almost sure that it was Enchanter. It stuck to my mind because I
played it a long tie ago and, English not being my native language,
at the time I really did think that "noisome" had something to do
with noise ...

But do feel free to play through all the games anyway. There are worse
things to do in front of a computer. :-)

_
Torbjorn

J. I. Drasner

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Aug 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/27/96
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In article <4vr4t3$n...@koala.scott.net>, aul...@koala.scott.net wrote:

>Response: The machine pauses a seecond, then HITS THE FLOPPY DRIVE!
> You KNOW you've done something right when the 1541 fires up, even
> before you read the result, because the alternative (you die) has
> that distinct shuddering sound. Success and failure have different
> sounds.

AAAACK!! Oh my god, you just triggered the most terrifying sense memory.

There's me, playing Zork on an original IBM PC, all alone, traversing the
scary passages and wondering every second what's gonna jump out at me. (I
was a kid, okey?) I'm in some room wondering what to do next, when the
thief saunters in. Suddenly, the disk drive kicks in with that wonderful
paleolithic-computer grinding noise. And there's me leaping halfway out of
my seat.

I mean, who needs sound in Lurking Horror for sheer terror?

Seriously, though, it just goes to show how absorbing those games were. I
mean, I can vividly remember exactly how every one of those rooms "looked"
to me in my head, and when I was that absorbed (even in a game that came
before they really hit their prime in terms of prose style), a moment like
that would get the adrenaline flooding my veins.

Wow. Thanks for the flashback.

Arthur Chance

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Aug 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/28/96
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In article <4vjeu1$7...@freenet-news.carleton.ca>
dk...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Malcolm Symonds) writes:

> Matthew Murray (i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu) writes:
> > Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> > Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> > included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think

> LGOP-using the T-remover on the tray,then examining the newly created object.


> "It looks like little Ray Whats-His-Name from the third grade."

Using the T-remover on the rabbit got me ROFLing.

--
All managers should understand engineering. How else can they
appreciate that most smooth running machines are powered by
motivated cranks?

Bob Reeves

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Aug 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/28/96
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There is a "noisome [i.e. stinky] stew" on the slot machine in
"Sorcerer."

Funny error messages ey? Try going to the Bridge in "The Hitchhiker's
Guide" and typing OPEN EDDIE several times.

Getting the babel fish in that game was probably the highest I've ever
been. It was my first Infocom, & I've played all the games they
released while they were still an independent company. A close 2nd
would have to be making it through "Beyond Zork"--just 'cause it took so
long & I did it without hints.

John Francis

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Aug 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/28/96
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Malcolm Symonds wrote:
>
> Matthew Murray (i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu) writes:
> > Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite
> > Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
> > included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
>
> (stuff deleted)
> >
> > So, what does anyone else think?
> >
> > ================================================================================
> > Matthew A. Murray - mmu...@wsu.edu - http://www.wsu.edu:8000/~i9717029
> > ================================================================================
> > The Church of Scientology is attempting to suppress free speech on the Internet.
> > For more information, and details on how you can protect your rights, visit:
> >
> > http://www.cybercom.net/~rnewman/scientology/home.html
> > ================================================================================
> >
> Hmmm..so many moments,so little time...:-)
>
> Here's a few of mine...(Warning! HGTTG,LGOP,and Spellbreaker spoilers ahead!)
>
> **********spoiler space**************
>
> Hitchhiker's-If you don't eat the peanuts. A long spiel about your
> unfortunate death causing the evolution of the cosmos to a higher
> spiritual plane.
> "However,none of this matters,because you are dead."
>
> LGOP-using the T-remover on the tray,then examining the newly created object.
> "It looks like little Ray Whats-His-Name from the third grade."

I preferred the cotton balls, myself. I used T-remover on _everything_!

DOCTOR WHO

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Aug 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/28/96
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Mine was when that silly Dragon breathed at the Glacier, that just
cracked me up.!

|| ||
==== ---------------------------------------- ====
====== Doctor Who...alias...Mark Steele ======
|[][]| doc...@ozemail.com.au |[][]|
|[][]| Gallifrey,Constellation of Kasterborus. |[][]|
|[][]| Galactic co-oordinates 10-0-11-0-0-by 0-2 |[][]|
|[][]| from Galactic Centre. |[][]|
======== ----------------------------------------- ========
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~docwho
-----------------------------------
Central Coast Hang-Gliding Club
New South Wales , Australia

J. I. Drasner

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Aug 29, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/29/96
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Possible Zork II spoilers.

>Mine was when that silly Dragon breathed at the Glacier, that just
>cracked me up.!

Oh, gosh, I actually felt really bad for the poor dumb guy. I think it was
the description of how he died "with a puzzled expression on his face" or
something to that extent. Like he never knew what hit him! I always felt
kind of bad since really, he never did anything to me and there I was
smacking him and leading him around and then basically causing his death.

Cindy

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Aug 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/30/96
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In article <Pine.SUN.3.93.96082...@apollo.gti.net>,
c128...@GTI.Net says...

>
>On 28-Aug-1996, Arthur Chance wrote:
>
>> Using the T-remover on the rabbit got me ROFLing.
>
>BTW, a "minyan" (I had to look it up!) is a quorum of three Jews, required
>for public worship. (Now go look up quorum!) ;)

Um, actually, it's 10 Jews.

Cindy

John Switzer

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Aug 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/30/96
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In article <32231997...@news.ozemail.com.au>,

DOCTOR WHO <doc...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
>Mine was when that silly Dragon breathed at the Glacier, that just
>cracked me up.!

In one of the sorceror-type games (I think it was - duh - Sorceror),
you encounter a Dorn Beast, which is funny enough, but then when it
meets its demise, there's a line about it frantically trying to invent
"Dorn Beast flight" while it falls. (That entire "bat sequence" is
also pretty neat, for that matter.)

Andreas Hoppler

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Sep 1, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/1/96
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My Favorite Infocom Moments:
LGOP - finding out what the Tee-remover did, and how to use it in the game.
LGOP - playing it the second time, as Tiffany.
Zork I - the rainbow.

Andreas


Jeff Pack

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Sep 1, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/1/96
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In article <MPLANET.3229d9c8an...@news.logon.ch>,
andreas...@logon.ch wrote...

> My Favorite Infocom Moments:
> LGOP - finding out what the Tee-remover did, and how to use it in the game.

Addendum: putting the rabbit in the tee-remover. :)

John Switzer

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Sep 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/2/96
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In article <MPLANET.3229d9c8an...@news.logon.ch>,

Andreas Hoppler <andreas...@logon.ch> wrote:
>My Favorite Infocom Moments:
>LGOP - finding out what the Tee-remover did, and how to use it in the game.
>LGOP - playing it the second time, as Tiffany.

This is what ticked me off so much about LGOP2 - the game in LGOP was
different to a large extent when you played as a man or as a woman, but in
LGOP2, it was basically identical except for the most minor of things.
Someday when I buy a home big enough for an Infocom memorial, LGOP2 will
be "featured" in the basement, down in the corner, underneath the spider
webs and rat droppings, behind the rusty filing cabinet and illuminated by
a burned-out lightbulb (40 watts).
--
John Switzer | "There are no victims, only volunteers. You
| volunteer by looking uncertain and afraid. You
| volunteer by being, as grass-eaters invariably
jswi...@aimnet.com | are, unprepared to confront the hazards of life."

Ennead

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Sep 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/5/96
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: >In article <Pine.OSF.3.92.960819...@unicorn.it.wsu.edu>,
: >i971...@wsunix.wsu.edu says...
: >>
: >> Just out of curiosity, what are some of everyone's favorite

: >>Infocom moments? This can be anything--a point in a game, something
: >>included in the box, or anything else remotely related. Since I think
: >>Infocom has so many (and other game companies have so few), I think it

: >>would be great to see what everyone thinks is so special about Infocom.


Dealing with the adventurer in Enchanter.

It probably helped that I had just finished the Zork Trilogy, so
that my memories of _being_ that annoyingly anti-social adventurer were
still very fresh in my mind. I found it hysterically funny how quickly my
perspective changed. I was filled with such disdain, such _contempt,_ for
the adventurer while playing Enchanter.

"Grasping, brutish, little thug. No social conscience whatsoever.
I'm trying to save the WORLD here, and _he's_ only interested in
collecting treasure. Would probably slay his own grandmother for
something shiny. Hey, what? Ooooh, no you don't! GIVE me that, you
worthless waste of skin -- It's no use to one of _your_ kind anyway.
Pheh, _adventurers!_ The scum of the earth."

The turnabout still makes me giggle.

Of course, I started to feel a bit remorseful somewhere in the
intro segment of Sorceror. ("Gee...I've got it pretty good here, really.
Maybe I should have been a bit more generous with that adventurer...")

I think I get a bit too immersed in some of these games.


-- Sarah

Joe Mason

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Sep 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/7/96
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"Re: Favorite Infocom Mome", declared John Switzer from the Vogon ship:

JS>This is what ticked me off so much about LGOP2 - the game in LGOP was
JS>different to a large extent when you played as a man or as a woman,
JS>but in LGOP2, it was basically identical except for the most minor of
JS>things. Someday when I buy a home big enough for an Infocom memorial,
JS>LGOP2 will be "featured" in the basement, down in the corner,
JS>underneath the spider webs and rat droppings, behind the rusty filing
JS>cabinet and illuminated by a burned-out lightbulb (40 watts).

May I suggest putting it "on display in the bottom of a locked filing
cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying
'Beware of the Leopard'."?

(Douglas Adams always says it best... <g>)

Joe

-- Coming soon: "In the End", a work of Interactive Fiction --
-- More about the 1996 IF Contest at rec.arts.int-fiction --
-- October 1 at ftp.gmd.de/if-archive/games/competition96 --

ş CMPQwk 1.42 9550 şThe scenery only changes for the lead dog.

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